Case Number: 12-0560

  • January 31, 2014

    In regards to docket 12-0560, as I understand it, we have a venture capital company asking the ICC so A Colt for a speculation project. Clean Line Energy has a preconstructional option to sell RICL to National Grid.

    It would appear Clean Line Energy is acting as a glorified landagent for National Grid.

    If National Grid has an option to purchase RICL once the easement is obtained, why isn't National Grid asking the ICC for public utility status rather than use Clean Line Energy as a surrogate?

    Scott A Thorsen
  • December 16, 2013

    I am writing in opposition to the issuance of a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to Rock Island Clean Line though Docket 12-0560.

    If we look at the history of energy companies in the United States we can find many similarities between Clean Line Energy Partners and the company formally called Enron. It important that we study these similarities so that major mistakes aren’t made that will have negative consequence the consumers in the State of Illinois.

    Enron was a company focused on the profit and success of it’s executives and investors. It would go to great lengths to make sure that those profits were present. They used aspirations and hopes to guide their finances. When Jeffrey Skilling reported his profits or potential profits, he used mark-to-market accounting. Kenneth Lay, another executive, used his political connections to help the company profit.

    I fear that there are too many similarities between the business ethics of Clean Line Energy and the company that I just described. They are very vague about their intentions of this transmission line. The remain unwilling to commit to many important aspects of the line as well. Clean Line Energy does not have the commitment of sufficient generators or sufficient customers to even make the line economically feasible. Clean Line Energy uses nothing but aspirations and hopes to convince the commission of the merit of this project.

    I feel it is the Commission’s responsibility to ENSURE WITHOUT A DOUBT that this line is financially feasible, will be constructed by people of adequate experience, and that it is done in a very clear and transparent way.

    Clean Line Energy uses nothing but aspirations and hopes to convince the commission of the merit of this project. The commission should undoubtedly deny Rock Island Clean Line their request.

    Jeff Landers
  • December 4, 2013

    Dear Sirs,
    I am writing in concern of the RICL proposed transmission project. It should not be allowed. I am the owner and operator of the farm west of I-39. I had concerns about them cutting a 200ft. path through my woods that is going to be left as a forest preserve in the future. RICL sent a representative out to check on my concerns a year ago. He agreed it would make a change in the forest if they cut a 200 ft. hole through it. I showed him that there was an existing line between me and the stone quarry that angled toward the interstate.

    It seems to me like the sensible thing to do would be to bend the line further west and that would have changed the angle and pretty much followed the cut made through the valley. I probably would have lost a few oaks in the corner but the existing corridor was pretty much clear.

    With the environment regulations there’s no way they can mine that valley and then they would have to stay so far back from the fence line. You would think RICL would have better engineers doing the designing.

    The computer model on the RICL website shows real good that they have chosen instead to continue through my woods when they could have had little impact on that existing area by using the previously mentioned route I had pointed out to the representative of RICL. I’m going to lose all my 15 ft. oaks and at least a good batch of pines that I planted 20 years ago. I would also lose 100 yr. old oaks as well. Why would anyone do something senseless like that making two side by side holes in the forest? At least they could have sent someone out to explain why they couldn’t follow the existing cut.

    If they had a shortage of power out east, and were looking forward to this line giving them power at least you’d feel you did your part. This line should not be allowed period!

    I am very concerned the RICL representative lied to me last year and said my route change suggestions sounded good and he would take the suggestion back to his boss and they would save my timber. He said it would be reasonable to put the poles in the field area and avoid my timber.

    This area is near the site of the historic original prairie settlement of Troy Grove settled prior to the 1830’s. The confluences of 2 water sources provided early settlers to the prairie a deep enough spot to build a saw mill. Trees were banded and under the previously shaded areas of the killed trees were spots open to sunlight and free of heavy undergrowth. This made an area suitable for raising some food crops. Please note this was before John Deere and the plow that finally made it possible to turn the prairie soil. These first prairie settlers were warned of a Native American uprising, the threat commonly termed the Black Hawk War, and fled to forts for safety. Chief Shabbona was the messenger of the news and unlike the settlers east on Indian Creek who ignored his warnings no villagers were massacred or taken hostage. The village of Troy Grove eventually was moved a mile lending its name to the village south west of my property originally called Homer but now called Troy Grove.

    Wild Bill Hickock, the legendary lawman and gunfighter was born in my timber and hunted wolf for bounty in my timber. He left Illinois to seek his fortune but his parents and siblings remained in the area. The village of Troy Grove has a State Park in his honor. It is also documented his Presbyterian parents arrived with a few other families from the Green Mts. of New York bringing with them the Presbyterian doctrine that no man can own another. It has been proven the Hickocks were part of the under ground railroad sneaking fleeing slaves north to the next point near Dixon through my timber.

    Native Americans used trails through the timber to get to the locations north east where the government provided provisions. The last wild bison in Illinois was killed in my woods in the 1800’s as documented in The History of LaSalle County published in 1874. My neighbor has an original copy of the book and it clearly talks about my timber area and its importance. This timber was also the location of the first murder documented in LaSalle County. Two men were collecting wood and got into an argument. One pulled the other’s beard and he retaliated by clubbing the aggressor with a chunk of wood. The survivor was acquitted in LaSalle Co. court as he was deemed provoked by having his beard pulled.
    This forested area is rich in history and should not be stripped of its trees for RICL transmission lines and easements. The Clean Line Energy Company LLC misrepresented their plans to me and instead of using an existing path through the timbered area which would require no more work for them they lied to me and went ahead with a route that would do irreplaceable damage to my timber.

    This is not an honorable company and their plans will cause destruction of land for no proven benefit to society.

    Sincerely,
    Jim Meznarich, Troy Grove Township

    Jim Meznarich
  • December 4, 2013

    The Honorable Larry Jones
    Administrative Law Judge
    Il. Commerce Commission
    527 E. Capital Avenue
    Springfield, IL 62701
    RE: Rock Island Clean Line Petition IL. Commerce Commission
    Docket Number 12-0568 (or subsequent re-filed petitions)

    Dear Judge Jones:
    To quote Lewis Galantiere, “Only he can understand what a farm is who has sacrificed part of himself to his farm.” After reading David Berry’s response on November 29, 2013 to the Illinois Land Owners’ Association I feel compelled to respond! Once again RICL (through Mr. Berry’s statements) displayed lack of understanding in dealing with the farming community.
    Mr. Berry’s comment on behalf of RICL stated that we (farmers) are unreasonable because we are fortunate enough to acquire or inherit, and own substantial amounts of land that other citizens, would be unable to afford is unconscionable. His comments were insulting and unintelligent.
    RICL is completely detached from the agricultural base it intends to impede. What Mr. Berry chooses not to recognize is all the hard work, sacrifice, and forethought on the part of current landowners and past generations. Collaborative family efforts were required. In many cases spouses who helped on the farm were required to hold jobs off the farm in order to support and secure it. Mr. Berry’s lack of knowledge in agricultural economics is quite evident.
    RICL tried to sell this under the pretense that they would be going down the Rock Island Railroad Easement. What happened to that idea? Or what happened to the other option of locating RICL adjacent to interstates or on existing easements where virtually no land is taken out of production.
    Asking for an easement for in-perpetuity is totally unacceptable. As many people are aware, hydrogen is the bio fuel of the future. No one is foolish enough to believe these wind turbines will be around in 30 years or less.
    Thank you for your consideration,
    Robert B. Dolder
    Ottawa, Illinois

    Robert B. Dolder
  • December 4, 2013

    The Honorable Larry Jones
    Administrative Law Judge Illinois Commerce Commission
    527 E. Capital Avenue
    Springfield, IL 62701

    Dear Judge Jones:

    As a landowner in Northern Illinois, LaSalle County, I object to Rock Island Clean Line. LLC’s petition for a certificate as a public utility pursuant to 220 ILCA 5/8-406 (a) as stated in Docket Number 12-0560.
    Additionally, I object to any subsequent petitions filed on behalf of Rock Island Clean Line LLS seeking a certificate to construct a specific transmission line or other facilities pursuant to 220 ILCS 5/8-503 and a Certificate to exercise the power of eminent domain in connection with the construction of facilities pursuant to 2220 ILCS 5/8-509.
    I object to RICL for the following reasons:
    1. A huge amount of prime farmland will be taken out of production and impaired permanently.
    2. Illinois will experience a short term of temporary jobs and a long term deficit in permanent jobs.
    3. Transmission lines and towers will not generate any real estate taxes.
    4. This project would not be a matter of choice for myself and other landowners. Instead it would be a forced mandate by wealthy investors with one goal in mind; increased wealth on our backs.
    5. Major health and safety concerns. We have been informed that Eddy current loss from DC transmissions lines of this length is unavoidable and considerable. For example, there recently has been a fire along a transmission line. If this happened in our area on a windy Fall day, it would be likened to a California forest fire.

    I firmly believe that these wealthy investors would not consider this project to be located anywhere near their multi-million dollar homes.
    Our family has worked and sacrificed much in order to build our home and farm. I taught special education for 33 ½ years; ironically the same age as our home. Our life long plan was to live and enjoy our home continue living here through our retirement years and die here.
    RICL has created a bleak and obscure future for our family and many others.
    Sincerely,
    Linda J. Dolder

    Linda J. Dolder
  • December 4, 2013

    The Honorable Larry Jones
    Administrative Law Judge
    Illinois Commerce Commission
    527 E. Capitol Avenue
    Springfield, IL 62701

    RE: Rock Island Clean Line Petition Illinois Commerce Commission
    Docket Number 12-0568 (or subsequent re-filed petitions)

    Dear Judge Jones:
    Please be advised that as a landowner and the son of a fifth-generation farmer in Northern LaSalle County, I object to Rock Island Clean Line LLC’s petition for a certificate as a public utility pursuant to 220 ILCS 5/8-406 (a) as stated in Docket No. 12-0560.
    I also object to any subsequent petitions filed on behalf of Rock Island Clean Line LLC seeking a certificate to construct a specific transmission line or other facilities pursuant to 220 ILCS 5/8-503, and a certificate to exercise the power of eminent domain in connection with the construction of facilities pursuant to 220ILCS 5/8-509.
    The Rock Island Clean Line claims to have kept landowners informed of their plans, but that claim is as inaccurate as their name. I have received two letters from them, one containing a rosy, all-is-wonderful DVD which contained no substantial information, and just recently another letter which really challenges me to determine if they want to take my land or not. Please find attached the letter and the joke of a map. The map doesn’t’ show a major State highway (Illinois Route 23) heading north out of Ottawa, much less any of the county roads necessary to determine property lines. I find it hard to believe that RICL can’t be more specific about what land they need, especially in this age of Google Earth and Maps (software which is available for free). I believe they are being deliberately deceptive.
    I also believe it is unconscionable for a private enterprise to be allowed the powers of eminent domain for land seizure. Their proposed math is interesting-they are offering to pay 90% of assessed land value. If my home burned down, or my care was wrecked, it would be reasonable to expect 100% reimbursement, not a lesser amount.
    I am an employee of the Department of Homeland Security, assigned to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program. This is the program which evaluates community preparedness and nuclear power plants. I can assure you, that if a nuclear utility provided such minimal information on their planning, that both FEMA and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission would disapprove their request for a Commercial Operating License. RICL should be held to the same standard, if they want the same statutory rights of a public utility (which they aren’t).
    Part of their propaganda effort includes the claim of creating new jobs as well. However, I would like to point out that no actual numbers have been given by them, and it has not been balanced with a calculation of how many jobs with be eliminated, since they are taking irreplaceable farmland out of production, and hence the livelihoods of farmers, truckers, grain elevator operators, and every other person essential to the food chain in the United States. But I suppose doing an honest study like that would be as difficult as downloading the Google Earth program and using it to print a decent map to tel landowners what RICL wants to seize. I served my county for 25 years to prevent people from seizing American soil, and it is hard for me to see it happen now.
    Thank you in advance for your time and serious consideration in this matter.

    Sincerely,
    Michael C. Dolder
    Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army (Retired)

    Michael C. Dolder
  • December 4, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line proposed project is ill founded. They are stating that they will supply electricity to the east coast PJM grid. The economics of this can’t compete with the natural gas that is already being produced there in abundant amounts as reported by the Energy Information Administration.
    A release from Anthony C Liberatori Jr, Director of Marcellus Key Account Development, states that
    “Natural gas production from the Marcellus Shale region is growing faster than expected, according to a new federal report. Marcellus production has now reached 12 billion cubic feet a day, the Energy Information Administration report found. That's the energy equivalent of about 2 million barrels of oil a day, and more than six times the 2009 production rate.
    For perspective, if the Marcellus Shale region were a country, its natural gas production would rank third in the world, after Russia and the rest of the US. The Marcellus now produces more than double Iran's yearly natural gas output, and that glut has led to wholesale prices here that are about one-quarter of those in Japan, for example.
    The vast majority of the Marcellus gas is coming from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The shale also lies under other states, but most of the wells in Ohio produce oil, and New York has placed a moratorium on shale gas drilling.
    Federal energy experts are surprised by the rapid Marcellus growth, since the number of drilling rigs has fallen over the past two years.
    "A year ago, we were not expecting the Marcellus to be at 12 billion cubic feet," said Sam Gorgen of the EIA, which is a part of the Department of Energy.
    The current Marcellus production is even higher than the predictions of Terry Engelder, a Penn State University geologist who has drawn praise and criticism for his estimates of how much gas the region holds. Engelder had predicted that the Marcellus wouldn't reach the 12 billion cubic foot rate until 2015, and some critics said that was overly optimistic.”
    It makes no sense to try to compete with a vast supply that is already operational and very economical. The technology of this transmission line is old technology.
    They say that they are not seeking eminent domain but that is only because at this time they can’t. There is so much opposition to this project that there is no way they will acquire the route without a court battle on each piece of land. This is a direct infringement on private property rights.
    I ask the Commerce Commission to do what is right for the landowners and the citizens of Illinois and deny this project.

    Carol Wilson
  • November 25, 2013

    Position on the Application of the Rock Island Clean Line Before the Illinois Commerce Commission

    The Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club recognizes the urgent need to bring more renewable energy, including wind-generated power, to Illinois and other markets. Clean Line's request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity will help Illinois reduce its reliance on coal and nuclear power. The state and its citizens will benefit greatly from another clean energy source being delivered to Illinois.

    The Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club also recognizes the impacts a power line may have on natural areas and wildlife along its route.

    Significant natural areas, endangered and/or threatened species, and other sensitive natural areas lie within the Rock Island Clean Line corridor and warrant serious consideration:

    -Avoid Illinois Natural Areas Inventory and other habitats that are known to be habitat for Federal and Illinois endangered or threatened species;

    -To the extent impacts to important natural features and wildlife are unavoidable, take steps during construction to minimize the impact on these resources;

    -Responsibly mitigate potential impacts to these natural resources;

    -Operate and maintain the line in order to maximize the corridor's value and benefit to wildlife and biodiversity.

    Jack Darin
  • November 25, 2013

    Illinois has way too much generation. The state's Renewable Portfolio Standard is dead as the public is rejecting high priced wind energy and seeking more economical alternatives. We do not need the energy from RICL dumped into our state and drive down the market price of energy further. Illinois does not need it's own energy generators driven out of business because Iowa politicians elect to practice Cram-It-Down-Their-Throats" Economics. Illlinois needs to stabilize its current energy markets before importing wind energy from the far side of Iowa.

    It is interesting how other states utility commissions see it their duty to look for the "benefit" projects like RICL will provide outside of their borders. Perhaps economic alternatives such as the new technology of energy storage should be considered before building more transmission. With the budding energy storage industry, Iowa can utilize more of its own wind energy without exporting it and building costly transmission projects. If it is the duty of the ICC to consider the "benefit" to Iowa, perhaps the ICC should consider the benefit of other options available to Iowa and Kansas for the Grain Belt Express.

    The merits of this project and other potential projects need to be seriously considered. There are alternatives to RICL to provide energy generation to east coast states in PJM, but Clean line Energy would rather Illinois & Iowa not consider them. To Jimmy Glotfelty and Michael Skelly the only option is more transmission with fantasies of great wealth for the state.

    Right now Illinois has a huge surplus in the energy market. We export energy eastward. Currently Midwest Generation is bankrupt. Ameren desire to sell its generation because they are not making a profit. Exelon is considering closing the Quad Cities and Clinton Illinois nuclear plant.

    PJM, the eastern Regional Transmission Organization that handles the grid, is considering limiting energy imports from RICL to eastern states to 700 megawatts, or one fifth RICL's potential capacity. What happens to the remainder of energy from RICL? Will it be dumped into the Illinois market?

    To put simply, Illinois' energy market is screwed up. We do not need more wind energy or any other energy from the other side of Iowa dumped into our market. The effects of Negative Pricing from wind generation have already made Illinois energy a mess. Wind energy's 20 year Power Purchasing Agreements has forced Illinois consumers to leave high priced wind with Alternate Energy Retail suppliers. Customers have moved away from ComEd because they are forced to buy high priced wind energy through the Illinois Power Agency.

    There is no need for this energy in Illinois. There is no benefit from this energy in Illinois. Any "need" or "benefit" for this energy in states east of Illinois will only cause damage to the Illinois energy market. It is not in the ratepayers interest to see our local generation close down.

    RICL likes to talk about job creation but Illinois will lose energy generation jobs with the construction of this powerline.

    Energy will cost more once RICL drives out local generation. The wind energy is only economical because of the Production Tax Credit. Even with the Production Tex Credit, we are paying more for wind energy with 20 year Power Purchasing Agreements. RICL will also damage economic development of the farmland it crosses.

    Furthermore, this is clearly a speculation project. The developers and financiers of RICL will sell the project at some point. They have done this in the past to other projects. The financiers of Clean Line Energy are not looking at a long term investment, but rather quick profit from obtaining the easement.

    I urge the ICC to deny the Rock Island Clean Line public utility status in Illinois.

    Scott A Thorsen
  • November 25, 2013

    We are stewards of our limited prime farm land.
    Every mile RICL will descrecate is 12 acres, (1,560 plus in Illinois). Heavy construction equipment and ready mix cement trucks ( 30 such trucks per mile) will compact the soil into the consistency of concrete.
    Once soil has been so disrupted it can never return to its prior state. What is gone can never be replaced.
    IT IS IRONIC RICL CLAIMS THE ARE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.
    Is RICL Texas billionaires governamental subsidizied project worth the permanent destruction of Illinois pricless natural resouce, its prime farm land?

    Julie Auch
  • November 18, 2013

    I a writing in opposition to RICL . It is time that we put agriculture first and the siting of power lines second. The American farmer is trying to feed the world. The disruption these lines cause will hinder this production.
    The power lines if really needed should run in the least intrusive ways to protect valuable farm land even if it is more costly for the utility at the present time the utilities seem to get the path of lease cost at the expense of modern agriculture. These lines disrupt irrigation and the ability of farmers to make a living in a lease cost manor buy hindering the use of modern technology.

    Jim Ufkin
  • November 18, 2013

    It is also a fact that in Germany, a leading developer of wind energy, that fossil fuel usage has continued to increase even with the addition of more wind turbines. No evidence was presented that contradicts the reality that this line will not reduce fossil fuel usage in the states to the east of Illinois. That is not to say that wind energy should not be considered as an option, but it definitely should not be considered as an option that will somehow save the planet and that can be incorporated into the national grid as easily or safely as centralized power-plants have been. Consider that leading world scientists just recently said that wind energy will not reduce the use of fossil fuels, only the development of nuclear energy can do that. This news is ironic considering that Exelon may shutter its nuclear power-plants because of the addition of RICL. Also in the news, a Federal Executive Order has authorized agencies and other Federally funded units of government to begin assessing the impacts of future weather on the nation's infrastructure and to prepare plans to weatherize the nation's infrastructure against future weather. The corridor that RICL has identified is prone to significant tornadoes. Based upon the recorded tracks of tornadoes since 1950, it is not a matter of if but a matter of when the line is destroyed by a tornado. It is inexcusable to not bury this line based upon its lengthy corridor across nearly the entire state of Iowa and most of Northern Illinois. High voltage transmission lines were, in fact, destroyed by tornadoes earlier today, but RICL would be many times larger and will carry much more power than those destroyed lines. What is RICL doing by suggesting that it will pay a yearly payment, albeit pocket change compared to a wind turbine lease, for each pole? It's called repackaging; offer the bare minimum for an easement, then toss change around after expectations have been set so low that anything looks good. Compare the proposed $1,500 per-lattice structure or $500 per mono-pole payment with the typical annual wind turbine lease payment of $10,000-15,000, adjusted for inflation. RICL does not want you to know that because the shareholders of RICL stand to make billions of dollars because of it, but now you do know it. Please deny Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to RICL LLC.
    Aaron Funfsinn
  • November 18, 2013

    I am requesting that the ICC deny Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to RICL LLC. I attended the first public forum in Mendota. What I witnessed were three general lines of argument by the proponents. First, that the Earth is dying and that this one project will somehow save it. This line of argument was repeated by the college students who were bused in from dozens, if not hundreds, of miles away and who will not be affected by the line. Second, that this project will enrich myself-the person speaking or their company. Again, these speakers drove in from dozens, if not hundreds, of miles away and will not be affected by the line. Third, the infrastructure that will be built at the end of the line will provide more tax revenue for the city and school district at the end of the line. None of these lines of argument address the fact that the livelihoods of farmers or tenant-farmers, in addition to residents and business owners, along the project easement will be greatly impacted. Some of these farmers or tenant-farmers will undoubtedly become public charges because of this. Why does Illinois have a Commerce Commission if not to prevent the creation of public charges out of otherwise independent individuals? When a farmer is unable to aerially apply pesticide over a large strip of his property, much further than the area contained within the easement, that livelihood is either greatly diminished or eliminated. How would the Illinois Commerce Commission propose to fix that? Not once did I hear any solution by any of the RICL proponents. The livelihood or even life of the willing aerial applicator will be challenged. If RICL were to request an additional easement next to the first, every farmer's livelihood would surely end and the farmers will become public charges. None of these lines of argument address the fact that property devaluation along the project easement will detriment local taxing bodies. Every year, thousands of people in every Illinois county appeal their assessment and win. Again, how would the Illinois Commerce Commission propose to fix that? The project brings no value to anyone within or around the easement. The compensation, at best, will not be as much as the land would actually sell for in an auction and the area compensated for will not include the additional area around the easement that cannot be aerially applied. The compensation offered for each pole pales in comparison with the compensation that will be offered for each new wind turbine. I have not even read that the compensation for each pole will include adjustments for inflation. The alternative is a one-time payment. None of these lines of argument address the fact that the school district and city that will be the recipient of more tax revenue because of the project will lose an equivalent amount of state aid. Finally, none of these arguments address the fact that electricity use has fallen and will continue to fall in the states to the east of Illinois. Simply put, there is no reason for the line. I would presume that RICL hopes that if they build it, consumers will come. The reality is that the east coast states are disinterested in electricity generated by wind turbines in the Great Plains. The east coast states are interested in electricity generated in their own states or offshore. What will happen when the consumers do not come? Illinois ratepayers will pay for the line while not purchasing electricity generated in Illinois, harming the wind farms in Illinois and making it economically unfeasible to generate electricity from wind in Illinois. Exelon is against this project because of how additional heavily-subsidized electricity will distort the electricity market, forcing the shuttering of nuclear power plants that Illinois communities depend upon for reliable electricity, cheap electricity, property taxes, state taxes, and long-term employment. Moreover, no evidence was presented that proves that this line will somehow save the Earth. In fact, no evidence was presented that contradicts the fact that if this line detriments or altogether eliminates farming along the easement that the elimination of that farm produce will not further destabilize regions of the Earth that depend upon the import of American grain. The instability in the Middle East in recent years was largely spurred by high grains prices. Moreover, agricultural practices in the United States are more efficient and less-polluting than agricultural practices in the developing world.
    Aaron Funfsinn
  • November 18, 2013

    Dear ICC
    Please deny, Rock Island Clean Line utility status. It's ridiculous that merely having a line run through Illinois would allow this outfit the utility status. Utilities with operations such as plants and distribution centers should solely be reserved this designation, they employ our citizens and pay taxes.

    Thank you for taking our comment.
    Mr. & Mrs. John Segovich

    Mr. & Mrs. John Segovich
  • November 14, 2013

    This is a private company that does not deserve emminent domain.
    The project will destroy farmland, has no benefit to Illinois, will lowerer property values, the end of the line does not need or want this to go through.

    Rich Gunderson
  • November 14, 2013

    I do not think it is a good idea for the ICC to grant RICL any rights to be a public utility in Illinois. It is not okay for such an entity to infringe on landowners and the residents of the state of Illinois. The proposed benefits to Illinois residents seem quite inadequate to the burden placed on the communities the lines will travel through.

    I believe even the name of the entity is misleading to the public. I would not want this project near me, or in my community. I do not believe the proposed landowner/community compensation or imagined tax benefits are accurate.

    I do not want this in my state at this time. I hope this project is tabled as soon as possible. A better energy alternative must be found. To have lines traveling 500 miles providing little if any benefit to those in physical proximity of the lines is not a good answer to energy movement.

    Do not allow this poor business choice to become a reality. I am most definitely not against clean energy, but I am against RICL current proposal.

    Kathleen Clark
  • November 14, 2013

    We join with our area neighbors in opposition to the Rock Island Clean Line proposal.

    Whom does this benefit? The need for a private group to prosper>
    Whom does this hurt? Landowners, farming community, the entire area sees NO NEED.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Ronald and Kathryn Brunoehler
  • November 5, 2013

    continue :
    This young man wearing the clothes that hours a go he wore in his corn field had a awe of diginity and respect. Mr Jimmy Glotfelty , Clean Line vice president ,who got to speak once again for 20 mins, (only one allowed to do this) looked ridiculous in his new Cartwright jacket he must have stopped to buy at Ottawa Farm and Fleet on his way to Mendota.
    Which of these two men respresent Illinois jobs? Which would you like to do business Take Jimmy who doesn't obey rules and can speak for 20 mins. when the time was 3 mins a person. Jimmy would never wait 3 hours to speak but bully himself in front. Would you trust a saleman wearing clothing to hide his true self? Would trust a leader who kept running in and out of gym for unknown reasons? A vice President tells a lot about a company.
    Ill needs people like the Grundy County farmer. We should protect our agriculture jobs and our soil for the future.


    Mary Auchstetter
  • November 5, 2013

    I would like to make a comment on a presentation at the Oct. 28th open forum.
    A young Grundy county farmer waited patiently three hours to speak. He spoke of the unfairness since only his county for the 6 would recieve benfits in long term. He spoke of the personal and finacial cost just in his case. He said his grandfather and his father died within a short period and he is the one left to care for the family and the farm. He explained RICL would ruin his farm to the extent a developer in the future would even reject it.
    He expressed his desire to farm, the occupation he knows. For generations his family has cared for the land and have sacrify to buy . He feels to have RICL approved would be a disgrace to his family and all they have stood for.
    This young man is around the same age as Clean Line orange shirt gangs, but what a difference! He spoke unself from the heart while they (who will suffer no personal lose) read prepared general statements.

    mary Auchstetter
  • November 5, 2013

    The so called Rock Island Clean Line should not be granted Public Utility Status for the following reasons,
    1.It permanently damages property value and productivity i.e..
    It removes the option of adding center pivot irrigation which significantly increases production in most fields.
    2.It hinders Aerial application of crop protection products and fertilizers.
    3.It damages underground drainage tile lines.
    4.High voltage DC transmission lines cause strong magnetic fields which is hard on human health and animal health.
    5.It can permanently lower the value of homes.
    6.It is unnecessary.
    7.The payments proposed don't cover all of the damages.
    8.The possibility of Eminent Domain for a private project is outrageous.
    7.Wind farms are not good for this country i.e..
    Essentially American tax dollars are being used to subsidize the foreign investors that buy the wind farms.

    Duane Baker
  • November 5, 2013

    I am requesting that the ICC deny Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to RICL LLC. I am a Pilot and own a 3800ft airstrip with Ruth Otterbach. R and R Flight service operate their crop dusting service off that strip. As many as 10 planes fly off that strip during the summer spray season. This high line would be a great danger to the planes and pilots who fly crop protection in LaSalle and surrounding counties. Crops that would be directly affected by quality concerns are Sweet Corn,Peas Lima Beans and seed. This certificate would open the door for other private companies to request and receive permission to invade private land for their gain. The money that they are offering is like stealing the land from the owners. Land sales should be between buyer and seller not an independent appraisal. Net dollars after income taxes would be small. County taxes collected would not cover the cost of road and bridge damage. Ameren recently installed fiber optics on the old General Telephone easement. They did not inform the landowners and damaged many drainage tile along Rt 34. Once these companies have the easement they have no regard for the owners. University of Wisconsin Madison estimates 700,000 MegaWatts of potential wind power on the Great Lakes. They should build their high lines there, close to where the power is needed.
    William L. Otterbach
  • October 31, 2013

    Regarding RICL
    Docket number 12-0560
    I attended the public forums in Mendota, Il on September 18 and October 28, 2013. The comments presented at both forums offered convincing proof that RICL is not wanted in the areas they have requested to construct their power lines. This evidence was presented by individuals, politicians, and officials representing local governing bodies. Also, information presented indicates no need for the power lines (no demand for the product) and RICL is not only a poorly developed business but is not even a public utility.
    Based on information presented by the speakers at these forums I oppose granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.
    I urge the ICC to recognize the opposition to RICL by the public, recognize that RICL is not a public utility, and recognize RICL is a poorly developed company and deny their request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.
    Roger M. Smith
    Docket 12-0560
    10/31/2013

    Roger M. Smith
  • October 31, 2013

    I support the Rock Island Clean Line.
    I am an advocate for clean renewable energy for there is no debate regarding the climate disruption crisis we are in and the significant role our choice of energy supply plays in creating as well as worsening this crisis. The only debate is whether we face this challenge or, we just treat it as just one more can we kick down the road for our children and their children to address. As a grandfather, I find this morally unacceptable. In response, lacking access to clean energy through more conventional means, I converted my home to solar. This is not an alternative for most people either for practical or financial reasons. But they deserve the choice to secure clean energy. This is something this project will help address.
    We have a very energy intensive lifestyle that demands affordable and plentiful supplies. We have figuratively speaking picked all the low hanging fruit when it comes to fossil fuels. We are now climbing to the highest most risky branches to find more. As we take more risks, we are exposed to higher costs and accidents will and do occur with increased frequency. We must drill in the deepest parts of the gulf and the most fragile parts of the arctic, construct pipelines that continue to spawn new leaks, and implement controversial technologies such as fracking all to drain the last drops out of a finite supply. Basic economic principles dictate the need to find and develop alternatives without the negatives associated with current products and supplies. Fortunately they exist.
    The greatest economic development and job creation opportunity we have in this country is the transition from fossil fuel based energy supplies to clean renewable energy. As just stated, basic economic principles, if freely and fairly applied to energy supply alternatives, support the continued growth of renewables and the abandonment of fossil fuels. It is a path to increased and long term security and prosperity. In additional to the obvious environmental benefits, renewables offer a path to unlimited supply and decreasing energy costs where wind has already been shown to actual depress electricity prices. Clean renewables also do not have the many negative externalities exhibited by fossil fuels which burden residents with additional costs outside of the rates they pay. If we had accurate and fair pricing of fossil fuels, these additional external costs would be part of their cost of production. A negative externality is an economic term that describes a cost to society that is greater than the cost a consumer is paying for the product. In the case of fossil fuels, an example is the costs associated with their pollution and emissions that inflate our tax bills, doctor’s bills, and insurance premiums.
    I fully realize that the generation and transmission of energy involves construction and impacts the environment and land owners. I believe this can be minimized with careful planning, responsible choices, fair compensation, and effective monitoring. And when we think about our choices let me close by stating with the clean energy industry, there is no such thing as a “spill”, hence the term “clean-up” is not part of their vocabulary. Where with fossil fuels and nuclear, it has become a defining term.

    Peter Gorr
  • October 31, 2013

    We have been given plenty of facts, figures and details. So what ever happened to using them along with common sense and responsibility? RICL will be removing irreplaceable farmland from production if not destroying it completely for future generations. To give RICL public utility status is irresponsible. RICL is a private group of investors looking to make money off of the land used to grow food for us and future generations. Haven't we as a nation damaged and destroyed enough of our environment with little regard to our children and grand-children? Our economy and environment are in a shambles. By giving RICL public utility status (with the probability of them gaining eminent domain), we are adding to this destructive shambles. Common sense tells me that there are other, more responsible ways to protect our farmland and our children's future. Giving RICL public utility status is not one of those ways.
    Gwen Krenz
  • October 22, 2013

    This is a flawed proposal which we are very much against. Not only is this a land grab by outside interests, it is not needed and has been erroneously framed by the RICL sponsors. This would have a very negative impact on our farming community and should not be allowed to go through!
    Howard A Rowley
  • October 18, 2013

    RICL should NOT be granted a Certificate of Public Convenience and should not be considered a Public Utility. Their finances are uncertain, their source for the power they hope to transmit is uncertain, many possible destinations for that electricity have rejected said power. They don't want it.

    For many reasons the landowners of Illinois want to protect their land from such an affront of power lines. Much of Illinois farm ground is already blighted with windmills. We wish to remain stewards of our land, and to protect the remaining farm ground from millions of yards
    of concrete and a forever blight of electric lines.

    To steal our land through Eminent Domain for these fly-by-night companies is a catastrophe for our farming operations, for our health, for the resale of our land. It's a disastrous experiment, and one we
    reject wholeheartedly. We will not concede.

    Janice Rutherford
  • October 18, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line is truely a "bridge to no where" project proposed to be built on the backs of Illinois farmers. This proposal will not reduce electric rates in Illinois as Illinois is already a net exporter of electric power. Consumers on the east coast have stated that they do not want or need the power. There is no wind mill farm in the west that can provide the power needed to fullfill the proposal. In my mind the support and opposition to this project fall into two camps; supporters will make money from the project, opposition will pay the price with decreased land values and the inability to use modern farming techniques. And that doesn't consider the cost to the State of Illinois taxpayers. This project is not a part of any comprehensive plan. It is not needed and not wanted.
    Kurt Larson
  • October 3, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity. The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3,500 megawatts of renewable power. The best wind resources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois.
    Matthew Steffen
  • October 3, 2013

    LOG #487

    Illinois Commerce Commission
    527 East Capitol Avenue
    Springfield, Illinois 62701

    Dear Commissioner,

    I am writing in support of the Rock Island Clean Line.

    Illinois has a chance to diversify its electricity sources and ensure a more reliable electrical grid and transmission is the key. I support diversification of the state’s electricity sources in order to increase reliability and lower prices.

    Please diversify Illinois power supply and strengthen the electrical grid by supporting the Rock Island Clean Line,

    Thank you,

    Rick Phelps
    13792 Chestnut LN Huntley
    Huntley Illinois 60142

  • September 30, 2013

    I respectfully ask the ICC to DENY the order granting Rock Island Clean Line LLC the status of public utility, which would untimately give them eminent domain over Illinois land, and allow them to construct 500 miles of high voltage towers. It is a private, out of state, company with private interests attempting to make private gain - all of this at the expense of the Illinois citizens. They have not proven a need for this high voltage DC transmission line and the governors from the states in the East have written letters stating that they do not want this, as it undermines their own states' ability to produce their own clean energy. I am very much in favor of renewable clean energy, but NOT this way. We need energy plans that utilize public right of way areas, not ones that carve up land at the discretion of anyone wanting to - especially in order to make only private gain. This is not a good plan for anyone but the Texas investors, and it is certainly not the American way. PLEASE DENY THIS PETITION.
    Judith Rosengren
  • September 30, 2013

    Regarding RICL

    I attended the forum conducted by the ICC in Mendota, IL on 9/18/2013.

    I am requesting another public forum be scheduled. There were many people present that could not speak due to lack of time.

    I was greatly impressed by the amount of opposition to this RICL project I hope the ICC takes note of the opposition to this project as was evident at the forum.

    Roger Smith
    Earlville, IL
    9/19/2013

    Roger Smith
  • September 26, 2013

    Hmmmmm... Let's weigh this out. Food on the table or turn off a few lights. Duhhhh
    Sue Seng
  • September 25, 2013

    If someone put a lemon aid stand up in your front yard and you couldn’t do anything about it you wouldn’t like it very much. Well that’s how I feel about rock island clean lines energy transmission project. Rock island wants to take a 200 ft easement through eminent domain and build a monstrous tower which will be a handicap to my farming operation. This project will likely result in soil compaction, drainage tile destruction and lower grain production rates on my property. We will find it more difficult using GPS, farming around the tower, controlling weed growth and crop dusting. These factors alone will result in a decrease in the property value of my land. Since Rock island has not developed a single transmission line or operated any kind of energy business and has not demonstrated an ability to manage a major high voltage transmission line the land holders are at risk.
    RICL is offering no protection to landowners who are to be burdened with the towers and lines in the event they are constructed and the facilities have to be scrapped; this creates a real and unreasonable risk of becoming a stranded asset and abandonment with no financial security to be provided should the line and towers be decommissioned. Can you imagine having a huge rusting tower in the middle of your property and having no control over it. Since Illinois would only serve as conduit to connect out of state electric generation to out of state customers. Additional Illinois-based wind development would be harmed by the project as it would usurp market opportunities for Illinois wind developers, and take up valuable transmission corridors for a line to which Illinois generators will be unable to connect. Every land owner in the area would be denied the opportunity to put up a wind turbine if they wanted to. As a rate base, cost allocation project, some portion of the costs of the project would be imposed upon the customers, without consent. These are just a few of the reasons I believe the ICC should not grant public utility status to RICL.

    Kenneth Funfsinn
  • September 25, 2013

    Dear ICC Chief Clerk's Office;

    I most certainly support the Rock Island Clean Line LLC and petition that consideration be given to this corporation to provide public utility services.

    Stephen J. Anderson
  • September 25, 2013

    I was present at the public hearing in Mendota, but did not get a chance to speak. I support for the Rock Island Clean Line project (RICL). The importance of renewable energy cannot be overstated. Dirty energy is already destroying the quality of life in Illinois and across the US, and will only continue to worsen. Existing utilities systems have failed, and are failing, to innovate renewable energy sources in a meaningful way. Existing utilities systems have failed to challange the status quo, because they are the status quo. This is why it is crucial to open opportunities to NEW players in the field, like RICL. As you have read in the testimony of Illinois counties, school districts, and members of local labor forces, there will be many more benefits beyond opening the door for renewable energy in Illinois. Here's the thing: what is already overdue should not be delayed any further. Think of me and my future children, and your children and grandchildren. My question for the ICC is: if not now, when?
    Rebecca Marshall
  • September 25, 2013

    What a great combination of actions. Making jobs for many workers and improving our energy grid to carry green energy where it is needed. Our city and many around us have asked to 100% green power when we aggregated. A new transmission line from the wind farms in Iowa would help.
    Bob Jorgensen
  • September 25, 2013

    Our current transmission infrastructure remains a major barrier to the deployment of renewable energy, and the reduced carbon emissions and increased economic benefits that could come with its use.

    In stark contrast to some other infrastructure projects underway in the country, Clean Line Energy is committed to using a domestic supply chain for their projects and local workers for the installations.

    Illinois needs a modern electricity grid to harness clean sources of energy, efficiently and securely. That’s why I’m supporting the Rock Island Clean Line Project and I’m urging you to move forward with it immediately.

    Matt Slade
  • September 25, 2013

    I support this clean energy line
    Travis Solberg
  • September 25, 2013

    I am in support of the Rock Island Clean Line LLC to construction of the electric transmission line. IL must be actively pursue clean and renewable energy so support the health of it's citizens, create employment opportunities, cut our co2 output, save resources, and demonstrates our state's commitement to the health and well being of our planet and future generations.
    Kathryn Dittemore
  • September 25, 2013

    Our current transmission infrastructure remains a major barrier to the deployment of renewable energy, and the reduced carbon emissions and increased economic benefits that could come with its use. Illinois needs a modern electricity grid to harness clean sources of renewable energy, efficiently and securely.

    In stark contrast to some other infrastructure projects underway in the country, Clean Line Energy is committed to using a domestic supply chain for their projects and local workers for the installations. I support that concept as a tool to help build community. That’s why I’m supporting the Rock Island Clean Line Project and I’m urging you to move forward with it immediately.

    David Atwood
  • September 25, 2013

    We need a better transmission infrastructure and jobs for Illinois workers.
    Illinois needs a modern electricity grid to harness clean sources of energy, efficiently and securely. That’s why I’m supporting the Rock Island Clean Line Project.

    Beatrice Lumpkin
  • September 24, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line is not a good plan. Long distance transmission lines use up valuable property. This line plans on cutting through private woodlands which are important local wildlife habitat. These timber stands include old hardwood forests which have, incidentally, not been assessed for the presence of Indiana brown bats or other endangered species. RICL’s easement of 200-300 feet would require clear-cutting with probable use of herbicides to maintain openness. This long distance line is not a “green” solution. It is an industrialization.
    It is ironic that RICL represents itself as a “clean line” when, according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s May 22, 2012 testimony on Docket No. ER 12-365-000 it states, “Additionally Rock Island contends that establishing a preference for renewables is essential in developing the Project because interested stakeholders and potential customers, including environmental organizations and renewable energy developers, are less likely to support” and please note this; “A TRANSMISSION PROJECT THAT WILL ULTIMATELY BE USED TO TRANSMIT COAL-FIRED GENERATION.” Essentially, RICL can BE nothing more than another transmission line which must carry electricity from any dirty generating source according to FERC rules. RICL’s request for such a preference was denied by FERC.
    Establishing and maintaining LOCAL Illinois clean energy generation and distribution and using energy efficiency make more sense and supply more jobs in Illinois than whipping up another (AND UNNEEDED) transmission line. Additionally, the local option saves increasingly imperiled wild lands.
    Please deny RICL public utility status.

    Barb Reynolds
  • September 24, 2013

    9-18-2013
    We are Rock Island County Residents, of Cordova IL. We are 100% against ANY HVDC transmission line being built anywhere in the State of Illinois by anyone. We have spent a great deal of time researching the proposed Rock Island Clean Line LLC project. The deception by this company starts right with its name, goes on and gets worse. As landowners of 80+ acres, the proposed line path does not come through our property. We are opposed to it because:
    * It is an absolute waste of money.
    * It is not needed.
    * It has little to no positive effects for the citizens and taxpayers of the State of Illinois.
    * It has a flawed business plan.
    * FERC ruled it cannot be used exclusively for CLEAN ENERGY.
    * It will drive our electric prices higher.
    * The proposed pitiful compensation and contract to landowners is immoral.
    * When / If “Eminent Domain” is granted if forces landowners against their will to give up control of their land to a private company for capital gain. This is just plain wrong.
    * The possible adverse health effect of this “Mega Transmission line are unknown”. We live close to this line and don’t want any of our family (especially our 3.5 young son) exposed to it on a continual basis.

    Sincerely,
    Steve & Brenna Francisko

    Steven T. Francisko
  • September 18, 2013

    As a Union Electric Linesman with 40 plus years in the tools I firmly believe this HVDC line is not in the best interest of Illinois. The energy transmitted on this line is of no use to the citizens of the state with the possible exception of a few on the PJM grid. Being an HVDC line, energy will be transported from northwest Iowa to Illinois’ eastern border with no access to put energy on or take energy off. Where is the benefit for Illinois communities? Are we to be appeased with a few temporary jobs as construction crews use our Illinois farmlands and forests to churn out profits for east coast billionaires operating out of Texas who even refuse to keep their books in Illinois? According to Commonwealth Edison, no proof of increased reliability in the existing Illinois grid has been proven. Distributed generation makes more sense than a dedicated transmission line. One fault on one structure interrupts supply on a dedicated line. Distributed generation would require multiple faults at multiple locations to appreciably affect the system as a whole.
    The jobs and economic development questions are readily addressed through developing and advancing the already existing smart grid, energy efficiency and clean energy initiatives, (instate wind, solar, clean coal, and possibly nuclear with some new technology). This path forward provides employment and entrepreneurial opportunities creating long term in-state jobs for Illinois residents and taxpayers. Pursuing these objectives will advance Illinois’ goal of reducing our carbon footprint.
    RICL spends a lot of time banging the clean energy drum but FERC has already ruled that they must transport energy for all producers’ coal, nuclear, gas and solar/wind. RICL argued that they needed to get environmental organizations and renewable energy developers onboard to help ensure the project’s acceptance and FERC ruled against granting the ability to even for one year side-step the law. This merchant transmission line is strictly a venture capital proposition with little to no actual real world property investment. A proposed line from a proposed supply to a proposed market does not seem a fair trade for current Illinois taxpayers.
    If granted public utility status, RICL could then use eminent domain to take property from taxpaying Illinois citizens at bargain prices. This would in turn devalue the worth of that entire property by up to 20% according to some real estate studies. The presence of power line structures would compromise present and future use and value of the land so used. Farms in Illinois are businesses. How well would this be accepted if RICL wanted to cut through a Caterpillar or John Deere factory compromising productivity, and flexibility in land use both now and into the future?
    William Reynolds
    Colona, Illinois

    William Reynolds
  • September 18, 2013

    I received an e-mail from the Rock Energy Clean Line Energy. It tells of how wonderful their 500 mile wind generation line is.
    My question to you and to your board is this: what in this set-up of these wind generators is going to prevent the slaughter of hundreds, if not thousands, of flying birds including eagles, hawks, condors, owls, kestrels, indigenous bird species plus bats all of which instinctively look down while flying and thus, fly into the rotating blades of the wind generators?
    You can confirm this information in "The Blaze", 03/10/12; "National Review Online", 05/21/12; "Phys.org", 09/11/13; "JunkScience.Com", 09/11/13; Fox News - Associated Press, 09/11/13; and "Politix.topix.com",09/14/13.

    Sharon Larson
  • September 18, 2013

    I am writing to support the request from Rock Island Clean Line LLC for approval by the Illinois Commerce Commission of a petition for granting a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity pursuant to Section 8-406 of the Public Utilities Act as a Transmission Public Utility and to Construct, Operate and Maintain an Electric Transmission Line and Authorizing and Directing Rock Island Clean Line pursuant to Section 8-503 of the Public Utilities Act to Construct an Electric Transmission Line.

    Missman, Inc. is an engineering consulting firm with its headquarters in Rock Island, Illinois and founded in 1946. We provide civil, structural, environmental, and land surveying services to clients in the public and private sectors from our offices in Rock Island, Rockford, and Sycamore, Illinois and in Bettendorf, Iowa.

    We have been following the Rock Island Clean Line project for more than two years. We are supportive of its basic objective of linking the supply of wind-generated electrical energy from northwest Iowa, South Dakota and Minnesota to the communities and businesses in Illinois and other states to the east. We have been impressed by the innovative and comprehensive approach which Rock Island Clean Line has taken to advance this project.

    We also support the project advancing the diversification of the sources of the electric energy supply to Illinois. The less-populated areas to the west have the wind resources to generate clean, renewable power. Tapping this supply will reduce the need for further investment in and the negative environmental consequences which can come with other more traditional power generation sources.

    We look forward to the economic benefits to our local economy which will come with the jobs and purchases which will come with the construction and the ongoing support and maintenance of the new facilities.

    We ask for the Commission’s approval of the Rock Island Clean Line proposal.

    Patrick D. Eikenberry, President/CEO, Missman, Inc.
  • September 13, 2013

    I support the clean line project because in times when the climate is rapidly shifting we need to start making initiatives to bring about progressive change and i believe there's no better way to do that then to support clean and renewable energy.
    Josh Yelle
  • September 13, 2013

    Clean diversified energy sources, updated reliable infrastructure and additional energy capacity are critical to everyone's success. Rock Island Clean Line provides all of these things.
    Nathan Wade
  • September 13, 2013

    I am in support of new cleaner sources of electricity! We can get more energy from Wind Turbines, but we can't use the power if we can't travel the power.

    I think the Rock Island Clean Line is a great opportunity to get our state the clean energy generated by these wind farms and to help the growth of our state while keeping costs down at the same time. WIN WIN

    Carter Sterling
  • September 13, 2013

    I fully and wholeheartedly support your efforts to bring cleaner and cheaper energy to Illinois. Thank you for your consideration of our energy impact on our future generations.
    Aacia Drissi
  • September 13, 2013

    The construction of this new line is very important. It is paving the way to bringing clean renewable energy to our state. Our future generations are depending on us to make smart decisions NOW!!!! If we don't make the right choices now for clean energy it might be to late. Lets be a leader to clean energy in our great country and finally make the required changes that are necessary. We need to act now and use the wind as a clean energy source. I know that the right decisions will be made and we can get this new line built so we can all know we are doing our part to a clean energy future. Our kids are depending on us to act now and make the right decisions.
    Cooper Sterling
  • September 13, 2013

    As a private citizen in the Heartland of Illinois, I oppose the "Rock Island Clean Line" project.
    My reason is very simple - taking pristine farm land out of production unnecessarily is a very foolish and damaging prospect. Our farmland is a finite resource and must be protected. It should only be taken out of production for a very good reason - this is clearly not one of those good reasons.
    MLW

    Michael L. Wasmer
  • September 12, 2013

    From a business standpoint I am very much in favor of this project as I hope my company will be performing the geotechnical engineer for the project. A project like this is very important to our livelihood and may help us to hire more technicians and engineers.

    From a personal standpoint I believe it is important to maintain and upgrade when possible our countries infrastructure. The word infrastructure is to include roads, bridges, power lines, etc. If we don't maintain our infrastructure elements on time and make upgrades before failures occur loss of service is inevitable.

    I look at this project as an upgrade that has the potential to put more electricity on the grid from a renewable source. We can't say we want to go green and then turn around and say "...but not in my backyard".

    Terry McCleary
  • September 10, 2013

    Having an an additional transmission line corridor that can provide electric energy, green or otherwise,to the State of Illinois will increase competition with other transmission line owners that serve the state which ultimately will be good for the residents of Illinois by lowering transmission costs. I support this project.
    Mark Turczynski
  • September 10, 2013

    I think that this is a good deal and I hope you will support it.
    Tom Steele
  • September 10, 2013

    As I understand it, these transmission lines are to be used to provide the Eastern United States with electricity produced by wind turbines. I think that the production and distribution of environmentally responsible energy that is being privately funded should be encouraged. I support the Rock Island Clean Line.
    Bob Neville
  • September 10, 2013

    I am in support of the Rock Island Clean Line electric transmission line project. This project will provide clean, renewable energy for years to come while creating jobs for the region. A "win-win" for Illinois.
    Patrick Lynch
  • September 10, 2013

    I believe this project will be a great project for the State of Illinois, the United States, it citizens, and its businesses by providing lower cost electricity to consumers while creating construction jobs.
    Dan Solchenberger
  • August 23, 2013

    Clean Energy is good for America. I support this initiative.
    John Capodice
  • August 20, 2013

    RICL is a Texas Group with no ties to Illinois. Their owners are not Illinois voters. Their sales people sweep thur like carpetbaggers.
    Their workcrew, except for cement ready -mix truckers, will be from out of state. Their steel matterials will come from over seas, most likely the cheapest which is China.
    What do these Texans really have to offer Illinois? It seems to be a "give me" enterprise.

    R Dorfsschmidt
  • August 20, 2013

    Instead of RICL transmitting energy hundred of miles across fertile crop growing land, wouldn't it be more beneficial to Illinois to improve its present energy sources and make them more efficient? We should be talking about installing coal scrubbers, updating our nuclear plants ( they are the only source. of reliable energy), using more biomass plants, placing solar panels on roofs. Hear we are wasting time on RICL transmission lines.
    Not only would Illinois ulitities be improved but there would be increased job opportunities for Illinois residents.

    L. Dorfschmidt
  • August 14, 2013

    Illinois needs to revaluate their renewable energy standards (RES).
    Southern Illinois wind is rated poor and Central and Northern Ill. is fair to marginal. (Don't think of putting a noisy ugly turbine in Chicago or its Suburbs or even the lake).
    Since Ill. can not meet our unreasonable self set standards , we end up with private profit making companies as a Texas comapny RICL.
    The ICC has the power to put a stop to this abuse of Ill.
    Please set some reasonable standards that we the ratepayer will not be forced to pay out of state transmission owners.
    THERE SHOULD BE NO REASON FOR A COMPNY LIKE RICL TO BE ALLOWED TO INVADE ILL AND TO USE ITS CITIZENS.

    H Rother
  • August 14, 2013

    When it comes to constructing long distance transmission lines the rate payers get socked for decades . The few temporary jobs are not worth long costing rates and the abuse of Ill. and it agriculture land.
    dvpiontek@gmail.com
  • August 14, 2013

    I believe Clean Line Energy will help lower the cost of electricity in Illinois. I also believe that many new jobs will be made available for the many presently unemployed.
    Leah Chaiken
  • August 6, 2013

    We support the construction of the Rock Island Clean Line as both a clean energy project and a job creation project.
    Eugene Chaiken
  • August 6, 2013

    - Clean Line will deliver enough clean energy to power 1.4 million homes annually, and is the equivalent of reducing Illinois’ electricity-related global warming pollutants by about 9%.

    - The Clean Line project will support about $7 billion of new wind farm investment.

    - By bringing more electricity into the market, this transmission line will help lower the cost of electricity for Illinoisans.

    - Building the transmission lines will create thousands of new construction jobs and inject hundreds of millions of dollars into our economy.

    Brian Chaiken
  • August 6, 2013

    This project is a necessary step for improving our domestic energy plan. We need to support clean energy that could power over a million homes annually, while also reducing our pollution. This would help average citizens like myself who are interested in cleaner and cheaper energy sources, by providing more options and competition in the marketplace. Building these transmission lines will also create thousands of jobs and provide a huge investment into our communities!
    Justin Han
  • July 19, 2013

    Please do not allow RICL to get public utility status. It is a private corporation which would use eminent domain for private gain and use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It would take profit from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It is not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because their line is not exclusively for green energy.

    Yassir Rashid, the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Debra Jacobs
  • July 19, 2013

    I oppose granting RICL public utility status! All new projects should be shelved until a comprehensive study can be done to determine exactly what a coordinated transmission grid that would best serve Illinois customers needs would look like. This whole transmission grid system should be driven by the Illinois commerce commission not by out of state for profit developers whose only interest is passing through our state as cheaply as possible to reach high dollar markets on the east coast.
    William Reynolds
  • July 19, 2013

    Please deny RICL public utility status. It is not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from the Mississippi River to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    RICL is a private corporation which intends to use eminent domain for private gain. It would use prime farmland for non-farm purposes, taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    RICL cannot call itself a "Clean Line" because it isn't just for green energy. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.)

    Listen to the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashid, who testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Dixie Wirth
  • July 19, 2013

    I oppose granting RICL public utility status. It is not an Illinois public utility. There are no means to contribute other generated electricity or remove their electricity for consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast. It is a private corporation wanting to use prime farmland for non-farm purposes and use eminent domain for private gain. It would take profit from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because their line is not exclusively for green energy. FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.)

    ICC engineer, Yassir Rashid, from the Safety and Reliability Division, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.


    James Medema
  • July 19, 2013

    It is poor public policy to allow introduction of unproved technology (DC) to a society with an established AC grid.

    Also, RICL is a private corporation which intends to use prime farmland for non-farm purposes and eminent domain for private gain. It would take profit from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    It shouldn't be granted public utility status because it isn't an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off" ramps for electric providers or consumers from the Mississippi River to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    Since FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because their line would not be exclusively for green energy. It is a merchant transmission line trying to access eminent domain powers through public utility status.

    Yassir Rashid, the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Public utility status should be denied since the ICC questions this company's capability.

    William L. Rutherford
  • July 19, 2013

    1- RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain.

    2- RICL shouldn't be granted public utility status because it isn't an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    3- RICL is a private corporation using prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It would take profit from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    4- FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy. It is a merchant transmission line using marketing tactics to get "green" support.

    5- The ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashi, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project."

    Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Ron Kaecker
  • July 19, 2013

    RICL is a private corporation wanting to use prime farmland for non-farm purposes and to use eminent domain to do so. It would be taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    It is not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    RICL cannot honestly call themselves a "Clean Line" because their line is not exclusively for green energy. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.)

    Finally, Yassir Rashid, engineer for the ICC, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Philip Arnold
  • July 19, 2013

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy. Do not allow this merchant transmission line to access eminent domain powers through public utility status.
    Daniel L. Johnson
  • July 19, 2013

    I oppose granting RICL public utility status. It is not an Illinois public utility. There aren't any "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast. The line cannot be called a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy. Per the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers whether derived from coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc. RICL is just a merchant transmission line.

    RICL wants to use eminent domain for private gain and use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. That would be taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    ICC's Safety and Reliability Division engineer, Yassir Rashid, testified on June 25, 2013 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." If the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Kent Blackert
  • July 15, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line is a merchant transmission line doing marketing. Since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (nuclear, coal, wind when available, etc.) RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it isn't exclusively for green energy.

    On June 25, 2013, Yassir Rashid, the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, testified that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Marvin Riewerts
  • July 15, 2013

    We don't need wind farms' energy to reach long distances. We need legislation preventing competing providers from building individual long distance lines.

    Furthermore, RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain and use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It would take profit from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    Because FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy.

    Please note that the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, the company should be denied public utility status.

    Kay Gerber
  • July 15, 2013

    I have no issues with wind energy per se. My issue is with uncoordinated, ill-conceived DC power lines with no ingress or egress except at end points. A 161 or 345 KV AC transmission line coordinated with the existing AC transmission line grid would allow users at all points along the line to transmit and receive energy through conventional substations and therefore qualify as a PUBLIC utility, not a PRIVATE enterprise for the sole profit of out-of-state venture capitalists at the expense of tax-paying property owners who get in their way.
    Chris Reynolds
  • July 15, 2013

    I oppose granting RICL public utility status. This private company wants to use eminent domain for private gain and use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It would take profits from private farmers and put it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    It isn't an Illinois public utility. There are no beneficial "on and off" ramps for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    It isn't truly a "Clean Line" because it isn't exclusively for green energy and cannot be because FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.)

    Yassir Rashid, ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, testified on June 25, 2013 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Because the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Curt Jacobs
  • July 15, 2013

    Rock Island "Clean" Line cannot call themselves "clean" because the line is not just for green energy. FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy suppliers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) It is a private company that wants to use prime farmland for non-farm purposes, taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It intends to use eminent domain for private gain.

    It shouldn't be granted public utility status because it isn't an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from the Mississippi River to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast. It is noteworthy that the ICC's own engineer of Safety and Reliability, Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Public utility status should not be granted to it because the ICC questions this company's capabilities.

    William L. Swan
  • July 12, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line would be a great addition to Illinois' clean energy initiatives. It would benefit people in many states. I am glad to see such a great project in motion and I fully support it.
    Ania Kwak
  • July 12, 2013

    I strongly support Rock Island Clean Energy Line and their ambitions to provide clean and green energy to places across the country in an effort to transition to clean energy. One day I hope this resource can be used in cities near me.
    Becky Stanford
  • July 12, 2013

    Do not allow RICL to get public utility status. It is a private corporation using prime farmland for non-farm purposes, taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It intends to use eminent domain for private gain. I oppose granting them public utility status.
    Rodney McNeill
  • July 12, 2013

    The ICC should deny public utility status to RICL because their own engineer in the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project."

    RICL is merely a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain. This corporation would use prime farmland for non-farm purpose, taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It is not an Illinois public utility, not is it exclusively for green energy. Because the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) it cannot in all honesty call itself a "Clean Line." Do not allow this merchant transmission line to access eminent domain powers through public utility status.

    Arlan Reiling
  • July 12, 2013

    On 6-25-13, Yassir Rashid, the ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division stated that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Because the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.
    Linda Johnson
  • July 12, 2013

    RICL is a private company using prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It intends to use eminent domain for private gain. It shouldn't be granted public utility status because it isn't an Illinois public utility. There are no "off and on ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    FERC has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers whether they be coal, nuclear or wind (when available) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy.

    ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Granting public utility status should be denied because the ICC questions this company's capability.

    If RICL gains eminent domain, who's coming across our land next???Katie, bar the door!

    Janice Rutherford
  • July 11, 2013

    ICC need to ask RICL some vital Questions.
    Why do they avoid publishing a public financal statement?Do they have the money for a a project that is over 9 billion dollars?
    Where is this money coming from?
    What happen if the company goes bankrupt?
    What happen to our land they have seized by eminent domain?
    What is the real purpose for this project? Wind is only a small part. a front to something larger that has more profits for owners?
    Who are these people who think they can come and invade ILLinois for their personal use?
    Why do they have to make vague promises?
    Why do they need to make unrealist promises and statements?
    Why the secret agrreements as with the Ill. Dept of Agr. Mitgiation statement?
    Why don't they meeet with the landowers and the farmers as a group?
    What are they a afraid of or ashamed of?

    Julene Auchstetter
  • July 11, 2013

    A comprehensive nationwide plan is needed. . .Clean energy is a good idea, BUT as we travel the interstate highways cross country, we can't help noticing "wind farms" dotting the landscape. . .There needs to be legislation limiting the distribution area served. The long range distribution lines are a nuisance. Eliminate redundancy of competing entities reaching long distances to deliver "clean energy." Eliminate the clutter that will accumulate.

    RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain and use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. It cannot call itself a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers, (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.)

    ICC engineer in the Safety and Reliability Division, Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Edwin M. Gerber
  • July 11, 2013

    I believe RICL should have to prove necessity just like Com Ed, Mid American, etc. Just because they are "private" they should be held to the same standards as existing utilities. They should not be granted public utility status because they are not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    Yassir Rashid, the ICC's engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Brent Riewerts
  • July 11, 2013

    RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain. They want to use prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. They should not be granted public utility status because they are not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off" ramps for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy.

    The ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division. Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 the he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    There is no regard for landowners' financial impact. The line is planning to cross the middle of my farm. This will ruin my farm.

    Annette Hattner
  • July 9, 2013

    RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain. It should not be granted public utility status because it is not an Illinois public utility. There are no "on and off ramps" for electric providers or consumers from Rock Island to south of Chicago, headed for the east coast.

    This private corporation is using prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farms and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy.

    The ICC's own engineer of the Safety and Reliability Division. Yassir Rashid, testified on 6-25-13 that he is "skeptical of RICL's ability to efficiently manage and supervise the proposed project." Since the ICC questions this company's capability, granting public utility status should be denied.

    Simply, we don't want companies taking over our children's future homeland.

    Carolyn Miller
  • July 9, 2013

    RICL is a private company which intends to use eminent domain for private gain. It is a private corporation using prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists. Do not allow them to get public utility status.

    What happens when all farmland is commandeered and corrupted by private companies? Can we eat electricity? Farmers are the caretakers of the land. Farming is more than tossing seeds in the ground and waiting for them to grow. Agriculture is a science and farmers are professionals. Sadly, farmers and agriculture are taken for granted by persons who don't appreciate or understand what the importance of farming globally. Educate yourselves. Stop this greedy land-grab.

    Amanda McNeill
  • July 9, 2013

    I am very concerned about the erosion of private property rights coming down from federal/state governments.
    Cary Rosene
  • July 9, 2013

    RICL is a private corporation using prime farmland for non-farm purposes. It is taking profit from private farmers and putting it into the pockets of venture capitalists.

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ruled that all transmission lines must be open to all energy providers (coal, nuclear, wind when available, etc.) therefore RICL cannot call themselves a "Clean Line" because it is not exclusively for green energy. Do not allow this merchant transmission line to access eminent domain powers through public utility status.

    Dean and Lucille Urick
  • July 8, 2013

    Rock Island "CLEAN?" Line is not a "CLEAN" energy supplier! This is a proposed transmission line from a proposed supply to a proposed market. If any of these proposed entities should happen to materialize the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has already ruled that this transmission line will be no different than any other transmission line in that it will be required to transmit power from any and all producers including coal, nuclear, gas, and wind/solar if available. The whole "CLEAN" energy subterfuge is nothing more than a ploy to further the goals of some capital venture industrialists, who lack the funding and power (eminent domain)to push this project thru without pretending it will fulfill Illinois Green Energy needs.

    Chris Reynolds

    Chris Reynolds
  • July 1, 2013

    To whom:

    Please really think about this petition. What RICL are wanting to do will NOT benefit the farming community as well as the people of Illinois. The electricity will go to the east coast. Why should Illinois farm ground be taken out of production for the benefit of those outside Illinois. Any of the routes RICL are considering are already dotted with wind turbines which are really becoming unsightly.I think Illinois has done their part to benefit the electric companies. The land considered for their project is some of the best farm ground in the country. And much of it is being gobbled up by subdivisions and strip malls. The price of food will go up as the farm ground is less and less.This is a case of the rich get richer and the poor will starve.
    As a land owner near the routes, I would NEVER sign on with the project and to think eminent domain could be executed is absolutely absurb.
    Please, please, please use some common sense and vote NO to RICL becoming a public utility.

    VERY SINCERELY, Susan Seng Land Owner

    Sue Seng
  • June 25, 2013

    Rock Island clean line is NOT progress. It is simply corporate GREED by a wealthy few, in their attempt to become wealthier by stomping on the rights of the hard working, middle class farmer who seem to have NO rights concerning their property. This isn't the American way!!
    Diane Kleczewski
  • June 14, 2013

    I am in support of building the transmission lines because it will lower the costs of electricity for our state and create thousands of new construction jobs for members of my family that work in the industry.

    Thank you

    Jasmine Alvarado Paxson
  • June 12, 2013

    Clean Line will deliver enough clean energy to power 1.4 million homes annually, and is the equivalent of reducing Illinois’ electricity-related global warming pollutants by about 9%!
    Lauren Wolf
  • June 11, 2013

    No reason not to get this done. Not only do we need more sources of energy, we need clean sources. This should be a no brainer.
    Michael Robins
  • June 11, 2013

    Clean Line will deliver enough clean energy to power 1.4 million homes annually, and is the equivalent of reducing Illinois’ electricity-related global warming pollutants by about 9%. By bringing more electricity into the market, the transmission line will help lower the cost of electricity for the people of Illinois. Building the transmission line will also create new jobs and inject hundreds of millions of dollars into our economy.
    Emily Robins
  • June 10, 2013

    To whom it may concern:

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low-cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. This project would be good news for consumers.

    I send this with strong support!

    Thank you,
    Lizzie

    Lizzie Kaplan
  • June 10, 2013

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in Illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental, health, and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Roger M. Smith
    06/08/2013
    12-0560

    Roger Smith
  • June 6, 2013

    Illinois has electrical power: 6 nuclear plants, over 3,000 Wind turbines, 2 huge electical companies ( Com Ed and Ameren) and hundreds of ulitities companies. ILLinois DOes NOT NEED RICL.
    As for competive pricing there is a system in place for the Ill. companies.
    Who does RICL plan to be their rate payers? Is it the Big market ,Chicago? when we spoke with thir saleperson she said the aim was the East coast, mainly Washington D.C. I think Chicago got added on to make it Ill friendly.
    RICL is no benefit to Illinois or Ill. energy companies. This is a private Texas Company with no ties to Illinois.
    SAY NO TO RICL.

    H Rother
  • June 6, 2013

    · America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity. The time to change is now! The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3,500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power. The best wind resources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois.

    · The production of electricity via traditional methods results in pollution related to global warming, smog, and acid rain. The Rock Island Clean Line will enable the addition of wind produced from about 2,000 turbines to be added to this energy mix. Adding wind power to the energy mix is a way to reduce those harmful pollutants.

    · The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low-cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. This project would be good news for consumers.

    Joseph Benjamin
  • June 6, 2013

    Decreasing costs of electric energy should be great for all Illinois residents. And steady investment in clean energy is an absolute necessity.
    Daniel McCormick
  • June 6, 2013

    Clean Line is going to bring a lot of good, and not just for the environment. It will offer cheaper energy to homes and create thousands of new jobs in the economy.
    Bob Matteson
  • June 6, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity.  The time to change is now! The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3,500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.  The best wind resources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois.
    Marshall Sunshine
  • June 6, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity. The time to change is now! The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3,500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power. The best wind resources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois.
    • The production of electricity via traditional methods results in pollution related to global warming, smog, and acid rain. The Rock Island Clean Line will enable the addition of wind produced from about 2,000 turbines to be added to this energy mix. Adding wind power to the energy mix is a way to reduce those harmful pollutants.
    • The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low-cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. This project would be good news for consumers.

    Janet L Scott
  • June 6, 2013

    Clean Line will deliver enough clean energy to power 1.4 million homes annually, and is the equivalent of reducing Illinois’ electricity-related global warming pollutants by about 9%.

    - The Clean Line project will support about $7 billion of new wind farm investment.

    - By bringing more electricity into the market, this transmission line will help lower the cost of electricity for Illinoisans.

    - Building the transmission lines will create thousands of new construction jobs and inject hundreds of millions of dollars into our economy.

    Ari
  • June 6, 2013

    Clean Line will deliver enough clean energy to power 1.4 million homes annually, and is the equivalent of reducing Illinois’ electricity-related global warming pollutants by about 9%.
    Sara
  • June 6, 2013

    America need more clean and diverse sources of electricity.
    Rosemary Sheckels
  • June 6, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low-cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. This project would be great news for consumers.
    Nicole Danis
  • June 6, 2013

    I oppose Rock Island Clean Line. People can live with less electricity but can not live without food
    Clifford Somegroth
  • June 6, 2013

    I oppose Rock Island Clean Line. People can live with less electricity but can not live without food
    Clifford Somegroth
  • May 31, 2013

    it is important to me for an alternative energy source to be available. we cannot be reliant on the traditional avenues. Pollution is a main concern but also to offer an alternative to help facilitate a competitive environment for electricity. Please approve this privately funded energy source and give Illinois a great investment into our future!
    John Faddis
  • May 31, 2013

    We need clean energy! PLease approve this project. Everyone in Illinois will benefit from it.
    Sandi Watkins
  • May 31, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low-cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. This project would be good news for consumers.
    KYLE
  • May 31, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity. The time to change is now! The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3,500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power. The best wind resources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois.
    Valerie
  • May 31, 2013

    I am in full support of Rock Island Clean Line LLC's project. Delivering renewable energy to our market is very important to me (as is creating new jobs, creating more energy supply, and reducing energy prices). Please grant the company/project the status they need in order to begin building!
    Chris Faddis
  • May 29, 2013

    We must bring more clean energy to market. Clean line's Rock Island line does just that! As an Illinois resident I believe giving Rock Island Clean Line the necessary tools to complete their project is very important to our future.
    Andrew Jones
  • May 29, 2013

    No to Rock Island "Clean" LIne
    NO STATE BENEFITS
    We have Wind, Nuclear, Coal, Natural Gas Sources. We have sources.
    We do not need to be a "pass thur state" for billionaires to transport and sell electricity to the East Coast.
    We do not need RICL added electricity and esp. not their transmisssion lines.
    We have plenty of transmission lines in Ill. without adding their's, especally when the citizens of Illinois can not use them. The JPM system hooks into Chicago and the East Coast.
    There is no benifet to Illinois.
    Please do not for " for all the money in the world" let Illinois be used. Follow Arkansas example.
    Thank you

    Mary Auchsyrtter
  • May 29, 2013

    I oppose Clean Line Energy docket 12-0560.

    When is Clean Line Energy with the "transparency" going to notify landowners affected by the sister to RICL, the Grainbelt Express?

    How many more months will Illinois residents have to wait to be notified of the company's planned southern route through Illinois?

    The company claims transparency. Why are they not openly revealing the route through Southern Illinois,

    As owners of the Rock Island Clean Line through northern Illinois, this lack of openness is concerning.

    Scott A Thorsen
  • May 29, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.
    K. Utter
  • May 24, 2013

    I do not want the Rock Island Clean Line to come through this area. It is taking away good farm land from the farmers and is unnecessary.
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.
    Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years.

    Amber Emmons
  • May 14, 2013

    As a tax-paying citizen I think the Rock Island Clean Line LLC would be a boost to the economy and a benefit to all consumers. I would very much like to see this project progress. Thank You.
    Claude E. Sadler
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line Project is the best thing to do for utility rates, green energy, and job creation in the State of Illinois. This 100% private investment in our energy infrastructure will help spur job growth and green energy technology within Illinois, and help continue to make Illinois the Green Energy Capitol of the Nation. I encourage the ICC to approve the Rock Island Clean Line project.
    Randy Harris
  • May 14, 2013

    I'm very supportive of this. Thank you Rick
    Rick Hoepner
  • May 14, 2013

    I am in complete support of Rock Island Clean Line LLC. Please enable to begin as soon as possible. Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years and the Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone. It will benefit Illinois greatly!
    Walter J Schmitt
  • May 14, 2013

    America needs power and more diverse sources of electricity. The Rock Island Clean Line will spur development of 350 megwatts of new clean, renewable power.
    Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approxately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years.
    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind engery into Illinois and will decrease the annunal cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in it first year alone.
    I believe Illinois needs these jobs and it will benefit Illinois consumers.

    Woodrow A David
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.
    William McAdam
  • May 14, 2013

    1 America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.

    2 Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years

    3 The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.


    Get the money to the workers, so we can build a strong America.

    Michael Brady Anderson
  • May 14, 2013

    I am in opposition of Clean Line Energy’s application for public utility status through docket 12-0560. I believe that this application should be denied on the following premises:

    Rock Island Clean Line is a private venture by a private company. This is one company’s vision for an artificial need. Forcing landowners to surrender their land and property rights so that billionaire investors can profit is simply absurd. The claims and logic used by Clean Line Energy is both insulting to landowners (the true stakeholders) and deceiving to the public.

    The Illinois Commerce Commission, Governor Quinn, and Illinois Legislature need to review all of the current projects that are being developed by Clean Line Energy and other companies to make sure that a comprehensive plan with Illinois consumers best interests are in mind. This plan should not be based on political connections that executives of Clean Line Energy have, money that is waved in front of local governments, or empty promises that are made. The Commission should support a Notice of Inquiry so that all companies with their own plan of how to solve Illinois’ renewable energy needs can be evaluated.

    Clean Line Energy has provided no unbiased evidence that the high voltage lines will not cause serious long term health consequences to our public. Those that make their living from the farmland and live under the lines should not be put in danger because of this project.

    With so much investment into improving our grid and developing renewable energy in Illinois, it makes no logical sense to support projects bringing in power from out of state. With the current financial situation that our state faces, why wouldn’t we support in-state permanent jobs by creating the energy in our own state? The jobs that “Clean” Line touts are temporary highly specialized jobs that will most likely be outsourced and left to specialized companies. With in-state energy production, Illinois is left with tax revenue and permanent jobs for our citizens.

    I ask that you consider the past instances of investor driven energy companies. We, as a state, have seen many times that these companies are driven by greed. “Clean” Line executives have created a very complex corporate structure which has relied on past legislation, political connections, and propaganda to help it’s cause.

    Please deny “Clean” Line Energy’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560.

    William Landers
  • May 14, 2013

    This project will support approximately 1400 construction jobs per year in Illinois for three years. In addition it will provide low cost wind energy into Illinois, thus decrease the annual cost of electricity to its Illinois customers.
    Pam Nichelson
  • May 14, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.
    Cheryl Nourie
  • May 14, 2013

    I feel this is a positive step that would help our state both economically and environmentally!
    Greg Kipping
  • May 14, 2013

    America needs cleaner and more diverse electricity- The Rock Island Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of clean,renewable
    power. Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years. The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.

    DANNY MEADOWS
  • May 14, 2013

    • America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.



    • Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years



    • The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.

    Terrance Whitecotton
  • May 14, 2013



    • America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.



    • Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years



    • The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.

    Ron Litherland
  • May 14, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years
    Holly Bryant
  • May 14, 2013

    I am writing in support of the Clean Line project. This project will benefit the consumers of Illinois by lowering their electric rates due to an increase of power on the market. This line will allow for future wind farms to be built as it allows for a place for that energy to go. Finally but most important, this line will employ hundreds of people from Illinois in a time when unemployment is high.
    Tim
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity.
    Cathy Scachette
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year and will create construction jobs
    Dana Jones
  • May 14, 2013

    • America needs cleaner and more diverse sources of electricity - The Rock Island Clean Line will spur the development of 3500 megawatts of new clean, renewable power.

    • Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years

    • The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and will decrease the annual cost of electricity used to serve Illinois customers by an estimated $320 million in its first year alone.

    Dan Koeppel
  • May 14, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1,400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years. Rock Island Clean line will also deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois and decrease the annual cost of electricity to its residents. I support this project.

    William Orrill

    william orrill
  • May 14, 2013

    The Clean Line LLC project not only will create needed jobs, it will also build the 21st energy infrastructure we need for energy independence. Please grant this project permission to proceed.
    Michael Matejka
  • May 14, 2013

    I encourage the Commission to approve the Rock Island Clean Line. The Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years.
    Anna Koeppel
  • May 14, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line is estimated to support approximately 1400 construction jobs in Illinois alone per year for three years
    Jayne Lourash
  • May 14, 2013

    This is a huge opportunity for the American consumer in many ways!
    The money that will be saved and the jobs it will produce which will only spur on the economic possibilities!!

    Please say "YES" to this project, so many will benefit.

    Thank you,
    Debbie Arbogast

    Debbie Arbogast
  • May 14, 2013

    I oppose the granting of a certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to Rock Island Clean Line LLC. This is a private business venture and needs to be treated as a private business. I do not oppose clean energy. I am excited to see the technological progress made in harnessing tidal water energy and off-shore wind. I believe the east coast with its high electricity demand will certainly develop these clean energy alternative sources abundant along the Atlantic coast. Chicago and other major cities can take advantage of the best winds located off-shore in the Great Lakes. I see no reason to compete with electricity generated by wind farms in Illinois to bring wind generated electricity from further west across out state to the grid feeding the east coast. Taking productive farmland out of production for transmission lines makes no sense. We can't eat wind and each acre we take out of crop production means less income for Illinois and food for the world population. I don't think most people realize that our greed for electricity is impacting food production.
    Please help by issuing a Notice of Inquiry on all proposed transmission lines in Illinois until ALL can be studied in context of each other to determine whit is in the best interest of all Illinois consumers and landowners. I ask you develop a comprehensive plan that protects IN-state non-renewable land , and which promotes IN-state permanent jobs through energy efficiency, distributed generation, and renewable energy development. I believe if we as a world focus on these efforts overhead long distance transmission projects will soon be "OLD" technology and become a blight of the past.
    Thank you for your consideration.

    Susan Sack
  • May 7, 2013

    We’re not against real job creation in LaSalle County by companies that have our state’s best interest at heart. Most of the jobs are already contracted with companies outside our state as RICL’s own testimony to the ICC has shown.
    The people who will profit the most are from out of state. The real jobs and money are for the wealthy executives from Texas such as Jimmy Glotfelty who ran the Department of Energy which oversees and appoints members of FERC with an established ability to influence the legal groundwork under which this industry is regulated (or should I say deregulated). Something he can now profit from substantially in the private sector.
    Michael Skelly, former CEO of Horizon Wind, now owned by EDP Renewables, a giant foreign energy broker which has received over $400 Million Dollars in green stimulus intended for US companies. We calculated only four projects of the numerous projects for Horizon/EDP which are still collecting or proposed to collect stimulus money through U.S. University sponsored programs over the next several years. All U.S. taxpayer money going right out of the country to a foreign-based company.
    Jayshree Desai, former CFO of Horizon Wind through it’s sale to Goldman Sachs just before the economy collapsed and former director of mergers and acquisitions for Enron until their unflattering demise.
    And who was praising Ken Lay’s advice on how to open markets just months before they slipped into bankruptcy and even in 2002 stated that Enron almost always got it right with restructuring. We could easily compare Clean Line’s company profile to that of Enron. Do we really need a group reminiscent of Jeff Skilling and Ken Lay deciding whose property in Illinois they would be most happy to take by eminent domain. Whose influence helped establish RETA in New Mexico specifically to authorize eminent domain for Centennial West? Or utilized their ability to influence FERC to gain power of eminent domain across the country where they have offered resistance.
    Should we believe your claims that you don’t want to take property and won’t take whatever action you deem necessary to get what you want at the Illinois landowners’ expense. Nothing that RICL or Clean Line Energy Partners can offer in Illinois will be acceptable because it is strictly for the profit of Clean Line executives and it’s investment partners. The people of Illinois will gain nothing and will lose a significant stake in their own agricultural businesses not to mention their homes and land. RICL/CLEP spent years promoting this project to the political clout that mattered without ever making the effort to involve the homeowners along their routes with no real intention of allowing their involvement.
    llinois landowners are not that easily swayed by big money and are more than happy to look into company practices before handing over the deed to their land. Clean Line apparently thinks it’s ok to come from out of state to decide that our homes and land are expendable because they have a plan - not that it’s a good one or even because they need it for the good of the people of Illinois. It takes a conscience to believe that it’s not right to take another man’s home or land or inheritance for any reason. Not sure if the executives of RICL or Clean Line or any of their investment partners has one. Do we really want to hand over our power production and land rights to a company whose executives are more likely to sell out to their foreign counterpart for nothing more than greed? I certainly don’t.
    I respectfully ask the ICC to reject and deny all attempts by Rock Island Clean Line/Clean Line Energy Partners to obtain public utility status under Docket 10-0579 and 12-0560 and appreciate your consideration.

    Andrea Rackmyer
    Serena Township, Illinois

    Andrea Rackmyer
  • May 7, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental, health, and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Roger M. Smith
    05/06/2013
    12-0560 · Roger M. Smith

    Roger Smith
  • May 7, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line would not allow local utilities to tap into energy created nor have they completed thorough studies on farmland and wildlife impact. Clean Line Energy Partners, LLC projections of costs per megawatt hour are misleading and appear to be inaccurate. Because of all these discrepancies, they should not be granted permission to move forward with this project.
    Rose Marie L. Bucher
  • April 29, 2013

    I would like to voice my support for the Rock Island Clean Line and Grain Belt Express Clean line. I strongly believe that wind power development is one of many appropriate responses to the environmental, economic, and geopolitical problems associated with fossil fuels. A key issue with wind power is getting it from the places where it is most plentiful to the places where it is most needed, and I believe this project can play an important part in starting to resolve that problem. In addition, the construction and maintenance jobs as well as the associated economic activity and tax revenue make this project worthy. While there are certainly environmental issues that need to be considered, I feel the broader benefits of this project far outweigh the drawbacks.
    Michael Minn
  • April 29, 2013

    There is no question as to whether or not you should support the Rock Island project. You should, you should, you should. We are living in a world that is heavily addicted to fossil fuels. Everything we do is reliant on these dirty sources of energy that are bad from the extraction process, to refining, to burning. This addiction is leading to a global catastrophe. Climate change is not being debated anymore. Scientists are in agreement. We are seeing the effects every single day. From droughts to super storms to higher than average temperatures to a huge loss of crops, we are facing the consequences of climate change, and things will only get worse unless we do something about it.

    This is what we can do. This is the technology that America is always boasting about. This is what can pull us out of this ditch and move us forward. This is the change we desperately need.

    The Rock Island project will harvest wind from the windiest parts of the country and transport it to where the people are. It's so simple. It's ingenius. It is exactly what we need. We need to take advantage of these renewable resources, the resources that won't pollute our air, our water, our land. The resources that are natural. We don't need to blow up the tops of mountains or blast thousands of chemicals deep into the earth. We just need a windy day, or a lot of windy days. But, hey, out in the midwest, we have plenty of those.

    It's not enough for us to wait for things to get better, to wait for the legislation that will put a cap on our carbon emissions, to wait for the fossil fuel industry's subsidies to be sliced. Our waiting time is over. Now is the time to act.

    Virginia
  • April 29, 2013

    I am in full support of the Rock Island Clean Line project. There are many allegations against this company, but I would like for the members of the Illinois Commerce Commission to think about these facts:

    Our country has an abundant amount of renewable energy resources. The problem that currently exists is that these resource areas are far away from dense population centers.

    The Rock Island Project is going to provide an express route for wind energy to be delivered to market.

    For those who have made claims that the people in Illinois do not want more wind power are not speaking for everyone in Illinois, they are speaking for themselves. I am an Illinois citizen and I want as much wind power in our state as possible, from both internal and external sources. I have as much as stake in this project as anyone else. I am tired of breathing in fumes from coal powered plants!

    Sure Clean Line is a private company, but they are wanting to invest in sustainable infrastructure that will be here throughout our lifetimes. The sooner we can ween ourselves off of dirty fuels like coal and nuclear, the brighter the future looks for our children and our children's children.

    Those who do not want these power lines should spend some time in Chicago. There is almost 10 million people that live in the vicinity. Why some people would try and stop a transmission line project that is bringing enough wind energy into illinois that will power 1.4 million homes is beyond me. All of those people use electricity in the same fashion as everyone else. The time for change is long past. We need to move towards building a future that can sustain people's needs and demands.

    The point here is that the world is growing. People have become accustomed to using electricity. Global warming is a serious international concern. Green house gas emissions are real and most of them come from burning coal. If we, the people of Illinois, are ever going to take ourselves seriously, the issues pertaining to global warming need to be addressed immediately.

    The Rock Island Clean Line project is already years ahead of any immediate action that could be taken to help catapult our energy production habits towards a sustainable future. I am in full support of this project. I am urging the Illinois Commerce Commission to not only looks at the facts about our state's current electricity generation status, but also try to invision what a sustainable infrastructure consists of and how we are going to get there.

    Thank your for your time in hearing my concerns. Please approve Docket 12-0560 and grant Rock Island Clean Line Public Utility Status.

    Dan Dehoog
  • April 29, 2013

    Please approve case number 12-0560. The Rock Island project has the ability to improve the lives of so many as well as diversify our energy mix. Looking long term makes supporting this project clearly the right decision. Economically as well as environmentally the benefits associated with completion of the project can't be ignored.

    The millions of property tax revenues to come will help the struggling states involved. Annually it is said the 1.4 million homes could be powered from what is supplied by the HVDC line. Of the power being supplied it is likely going to be all wind powered from the additional 7 billon invested in wind farms spurred from Rock Islands efforts. The jobs to come from those additional projects add even more incentive to the already existing economic benefits.

    For those more environmentally conscious the pollution reduction offered by this line will be sustained long term. Clean lines bold claim of reducing 9 million tons of of CO2 per year is one I hope comes to fruition. Water shortage is inevitable with rising temperatures and the possibility of saving 3.5 billion gallons is undeniably a step in the right direction.

    I hope those who feel they will be affected by this project will compromise and accept that the benefits out weigh the costs. Passing up on this opportunity will be a mistake with regret to follow for years down the road. Rather than dealing with the hindsight of rejecting Clean Line, approve the project and help secure the energy future of generations to come.

    Theresa Verderber
  • April 29, 2013

    This being Earth Day we should think of saving our planet.
    What better way than to use our resources in a constructive manner.
    Building long distance high voltage tranmission lines thur productive farm land is not the answer. The bottom ans. is what is more important electrictiy that in too many cases is wasted or keeping land intact to grow food to feed the world.
    Please consider this in your decision
    Say NO to 12-0560.
    H Rother

    H. Rother
  • April 29, 2013

    This case should be an open and shut review, plain and simple. I believe that the developers have taken ample effort to put forth a plan that has the best interests of all parties involved. To deny this permit is to deny the creation of a stable backbone and pathway for renewable energy development, and thus hindering our national energy security.
    Seth Rients
  • April 22, 2013

    The state of Illinois needs to pursuer renewable energy.With the current source of power being primarily from antiquated polluting coal fired power plants.For the sake of protecting the health of the people of this sate ,coal plants need to be shut down and renewable energy be placed within our state.This will reduce the amount of pollution incurred with coal power plants.
    Mary Burnitz
  • April 22, 2013

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental, health, and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Roger M. Smith
    04/18/2013

    Roger M. Smith
  • April 22, 2013

    Clean energy is incredibly important because the future of our environment, economic prosperity, and health all hang in the balance. I support this movement wholeheartedly and embrace changes that may accompany the transition. Working together, one step at a time, we can overcome our dependence on fossil fuels and continue to improve the Earth. A very fitting prospect for Earth Day!
    Josh McGhee
  • April 22, 2013

    Please GRANT Rock Island Clean Line a Certificate of Public Convenience and NECESSITY. Communities would not be voting yes to municipal aggregation across the state if we did not want a choice in how we receive our energy and where it comes from! The amount of pollution coal and nuclear energy causes while being produced is alarming. We all want a better life for our children, but if we continue with the production of coal and nuclear, those hope will be terminated. I hope that now, with the possibility of an alternative, we will be able to ensure that future generations have a chance to enjoy the privileges we take for granted today such as clean air and water! I am a proponent of clean air, clean water, and most importantly, CLEAN LINE!

    Thank you,Rebecca Garcia

    Rebecca Garcia
  • April 22, 2013

    Support
    Chris Uhlemeyer
  • April 22, 2013

    It just makes sense, I turn on my light at night to read a book, my television to watch a show, my oven to cook my family dinner. I realize that the U.S. is a nation full of natural resources, but wouldn't it be nice to save a few for later. This is one way to get a massive amount of power to the mid-west from the wind belt. I support this.
    Martin Wiser
  • April 22, 2013

    I support the RICL transmission project because, the production of electricity the traditional way through coal and nuclear results in several harmful emissions that are precursors of global warming and acid rain. the RICL will enable the addition of wind produced from more than 2,000 wind turbines to be added to this energy mix. Adding wind power to the energy mix is a way to reduce these harmful emissions.
    Kristine Rose
  • April 22, 2013

    I fully support the Rock Island Clean Line project because the best wind sources are far away from dense population centers and areas of high demand. The Rock Island Clean Line is a cost effective way to deliver those wind resources to consumers in Illinois. This project will also create jobs here in Illinois that will be here to stay along with lowering energy costs!
    Victoria Rose
  • April 22, 2013

    I am a student at Roosevelt University in Chicago and an active member of the Chicago Youth Climate Coalition. I am also a coordinator of a city-wide sustainability project here in Chicago, aimed at empowering local communities to build an environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable Chicago. I support the Rock Island Clean Line project because I believe it is essential to begin investing in renewable sources of energy in the face of catastrophic climate change. I am working here in Chicago to help communities reduce their energy consumption, but we need projects like Rock Island to deliver renewable energy for more basic needs.
    I was impressed by the extent of Clean Line's outreach to farmers and community members that own the land on which the project would be built. As we build a sustainable economy, it is important that we respect the people most affected by energy infrastructure. Clean Line appears to take this issue very seriously.
    I support the Rock Island project because I know that climate change is an issue that will shape my life, and investing in a renewable energy infrastructure is key to building a livable future.

    Dylan Amlin
  • April 22, 2013

    Illinois needs a renewable project like Rock Island Clean Line. They have the necessary ideas and resources to make an idea like this a success. Illinois has been waiting too long for a project like this to not become a reality. I support Rock Island Clean Line.
    Josh Smith
  • April 22, 2013

    Rock Island Clean Line is what Illinois needs for renewable energy projects. They are responsible, I have a firsthand account of their commitment to the project, and they have the necessary skills, employees, and resources to do the job right. Please support them in their road to renewable energy in Illinois
    Sara Stanford
  • April 22, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line will deliver low cost wind energy into Illinois. Because Illinois has restructured its energy markets this new power supply could keep prices low for consumers.
    Robert Fernandez
  • April 22, 2013

    The letters posted on April 17th are the perfect example of "Clean" Line taking their sales pitch to clubs without any incentive to look at the real picture or the knowledge and experience to question the motives and the claims made by "Clean" Line reps.
    Mary Mauch
  • April 17, 2013

    Wind if a free, infinite resource and will provide an extensive amount of clean energy to the nation. The American public is interested in gaining access to cleaner, renewable sources of energy. We must continue to increase the amount of renewables produced and consumed in our energy mix and the Rock Island Clean Line project is an important component in making that goal a reality.
    Jamie Cross
  • April 17, 2013

    I'm posting a comment in full support of the Rock Island Clean Line project. My reasons for support are the strong, long-term economic and environmental benefits of the project. I realize there are some misconceptions that must be confronted such as farmers concerns for ruining their land. After researching the details of the project, I've realized that the transmission lines will be very unobtrusive to farmland and will require minimal square footage. The compensation landowners receive for the land agreements are payed out at over 100% the value of the land, and the local municipalities will recieve generous tax payments that Clean Line has voluntarilly pledged. On the environmental side, the majority of the energy in central Illinois comes from the burning of coal. If transmission lines are available to connect our populated areas with out of state wind mills, we can greatly reduce pollution and our carbon footprint in Illinois. This project will create thousands of American Jobs, stimulate the economies of rural areas and provide lasting infrastructure for America to be a leading producer of clean energy.

    Once again, I give this project my full support. I'm proud that Kendall County, the one I've grown up in will reep the economic benefits and be a leader in modernizing our utility infrastructure in Illinois.

    Jordan Rollins
  • April 17, 2013

    America needs this project! I've learned a lot about HVDC technology in the last few months and its amazing to say the least
    Johnny Keith
  • April 17, 2013

    I am involved in an energy club at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and it is my opinion that we need to begin using clean energy in order to even attempt to slow down Global Warming. The majority of this clean energy must be carried from the middle of the country to the high population cities that use the most resources. Rock Island Clean Line has the right idea in using high voltage direct current (HVDC), as opposed to using HVAC. They have a solid plan and deserve the opportunity to build their transmission line.
    Michael Sipusich
  • April 17, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line has my support.

    Although I am familiar with the challenges inherent in developing projects across valuable farmland, my concerns are alleviated by the level of commitment the RICL team has shown to effectively minimize disturbance and increase independent oversight of this project. Let me assert this by noting that the specialized High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) towers will allow for maximum farmland utilization underneath and that the project route has been negotiated with the help of local aerial sprayers to maintain flight routes to the greatest extent.

    Although the new transmission line will be a major change to the landscape, let's not forget that just a few years ago corn and soy fields were not the norm in Illinois. The Clean Line will bring a substantial amount of clean energy where it is needed most. As someone with a stake in the future I consider it important to develop projects with positive long-term impacts such as this.

    Emma Gilmore
  • April 17, 2013

    There is lots of discussion on this case file. I’d like to add a few points that are of great importance to me. Having grown up around a Coal Fired power plant, I am very much aware of how dirty and nasty producing power from coal really is. The switch to renewable energy is imperative if we want to have clean air to breathe. We cannot continue to keep relying on dirty sources of power forever. We all recognize the implications of global warming. Currently, city planners are preparing for dramatic increases in global temperatures. We have an opportunity to make the switch towards a greener future.

    Farmers are concerned about a power line going through their farms, but they don’t seem to be concerned about all of the effects of global warming. What are you going to do when our seasonal weather patterns become so unpredictable that you wont be able to farm at all? What are you going to do when we experience long droughts and none of your crops will grow? You will be wishing that we made the switch to renewable energy long ago.

    I support Rock Island Clean Line and hope that the addition of 2,000 wind turbines will help to shut down coal power plants. Americans need to change the way they generate electricity. This project will have profound effects on our current air pollution habits. The switch to renewable energy indirectly helps everyone on earth. Please open your eyes and look beyond your own back yard for a change. Global warming is a serious issue that affects everyone. I support wind energy and the Rock Island Clean Line!

    Ben Van Wyhe
  • April 17, 2013

    To Whom It May Concern,

    This weekend, I was fortunate enough to attend a Clean Line conference to learn more about the Rock Island Project designed to deliver clean energy from the Midwest to the Eastern US. I would like to start off by acknowledging how great it is that Clean Line is taking the time to perform outreach with the public about the company's intent and the different projects it plans to do. Little things matter and the fact that a company like this takes time and effort to develop a good relationship with people across the states is very notable. A well done example of this would be the aforementioned conference hosted in order to promote awareness to the residents of Illinois - very effective.

    After attending the conference, I do believe that Clean Line's intent is agreeable and they have my support to proceed with their project. I am involved in a university group that advocates clean renewable energy; of course, Clean Line's mission of making clean wind energy available to select regions of the country is an example of something that we would love to see happening more often. Renewable energy should be the direction of the future; it is great that a company such as Clean Line is willing to take the initiative and be a leader in this cause.

    In closing, I would like to make known my support, as well as the support of my club, in Clean Line's resolve. It is this type of innovation and change that we need to see in order to achieve brighter future in the upcoming decades.

    Regards,
    BL

    BL
  • April 17, 2013

    I FULLY SUPPORT the Rock Island project. As a Renewable Energy student I have had the opportunity to see first hand how many positives can come from diversifying our energy portfolio. As Americans we must embrace the fact the the rest of the world looks up to us and start acting like a role model. The choices we make today will influence the lives of generations to come giving us all the more reason to set them up for success. Rather than going backwards the time has come to give the country a brighter future one step at a time.

    A growing population, warming climate, and depletion of natural resources to name a few things are all the more reason to support Cleanline's efforts. The idea of creating jobs, supplying clean energy to 1.4 million homes, and strengthening our economy is one I am all for. Fighting the project will only prolong what must be done and slow the progress towards a more sustainable future. If the project is not completed it is only a matter of time before a similar project is called to action. With long term intentions to upkeep the high voltage power line, Clean line's work will serve the country far into the future. This creates long term jobs for roughly 500 people who would need to find employment elsewhere along with the 5,000 initial construction jobs. The Clean Line project will cause a domino effect or more jobs through the creation of more wind farms. With such a high voltage line the number of turbines, jobs, and economic prosperity that could be seen would be great for our neighbor's in Iowa.

    Choosing to ignore the abundant wind resources of our country could prove to be a long term mistake. While the potential energy continues to go unharnessed people continue to turn their lights on unaffected. Bringing to light FACTS of this project is important to any opposer because the ignorance can no longer be tolerated. Remaining stagnant is not an option, together a conscious effort has to enhance our lifetime as well as those to follow. Rock Island Clean Line is a major piece of the puzzle within the bigger picture of problems our country is facing. All the good to come from their efforts overshadows the sacrifices landowners will have to make to accommodate the line. The word sacrifice is a generous term considering they will be compensated for any losses they incur on top of the annual money received.

    Looking long term clarifies the problems of today that can be the positives of tomorrow if we choose to work hard and do so. Whether we like it or not sources of Renewable Energy are the future, CLean Line already sees this its only a matter of time before everyone else does to.

    Andrew Verderber
  • April 17, 2013

    Wind resources and energy needs do not always line up in convenient ways. The Rock Island Clean Line is a way to transport these untapped resources to those need them. This project is really a win for everyone involved. America gets access to a massive wind resource and Americans can continue to their goal of clean energy production.
    Josh Bertolet
  • April 17, 2013

    I Stand in support of the rock island clean line.
    IN MY BACK YARD
    to bring clean energy from Iowa to the PJM inter connect
    bringing jobs and sustainable energy to the power grida

    thomas roubal
  • April 17, 2013

    Wind Energy is a free, clean, and an infinite energy source. Wind will and currently is playing a very important role in our nations future energy crisis. With the american public interested in energy sources that will lower their cost of electricity and allow them a full time source of renewable and clean energy. We need to support projects like Rock Island Clean Line to allow us to have a clean and sustainable future.
    Zachary Rose
  • April 17, 2013

    I support Rock Island Clean Line and wish that they be granted Public Utility Status. As many comments on here state that Clean Line is a private company and would only benefit their investors, I want to remind all of you that Ameren and ComEd are both private companies and have been serving their investors since they established public utility status many years ago.

    The Rock Island Clean Line is a step forward that our country has needed for decades. Providing an express route for wind energy to be able to get to market is critical in helping to make the shift from fossil fuels to renewables. Our country has an amazing amount of renewable energy resources but they lack the ability to even begin to take advantage them due to the lack of inter-regional transmission capabilities. They are providing direct solution to that problem.

    I have studied the Rock Island Clean Line project and they have been extremely thorough in their planning of the route for this project. They have attempted to minimize the impact of this project. Everyone who is against this project relies on electricity for the comforts they enjoy on a daily basis, but no one wants to consider where they are getting that electricity from and the pollution that is caused in order to provide those comforts. The wind may not always be blowing, but when it does it is nice to have electricity being placed on the grid without contributing to green house gas emissions.

    Again, I urge you to grant Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. This is an infrastructure project that will benefit all Americans for decades into the future. Renewable Energy is a solution to global warming that is available RIGHT NOW! Please let the true potential of this technology have a fighting chance. APPROVE Docket 12-0560!!!

    Austin Umeh
  • April 17, 2013

    Please support the Clean Line Energy Partners DC Current Power project. It will create jobs and lead to cleaner air and energy security!
    Matthew Tomlinson
  • April 12, 2013

    Please deny Rock Island Clean Line LLC's petition for an order granting a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity. I believe granting them public utility status would be a travesty of monumental proportions. I believe if they are granted public utility it is just opening up a can of worms for any other company or investor to do what they want to our farmland.
    Brian Atherton
  • April 12, 2013

    This is a private company wanting eminent domain taking private property of our Illinois farmers for their own gain. I am concerned about the injustce to these farmers who feed the public. The loss of tillable land will impact all of us. The immediate economic effect of more jobs as these huge towers would be built will pass. The long range effect will be decreased food production and higher costs for the public. Why not place these towers ,if thet do go up, along railways or highways? Thank you for your consideration.
    Rose Espejo
  • March 28, 2013

    As one of the members in Block RICL, now spanning multiple states and three of "Clean" Line Energy Partners, LLC's projects, we would ask you to carefully consider the environmental justice implications in allowing this private company the right to plow through private land for private gain.

    We do not believe that it is an accident that "Clean" Line’s projects go through the heart of the least politically connected populations of each state. Carefully consider that a significant percentage of landowners are families or senior citizens- relying on the income from the hard-earned land that is significantly devalued by monstrous transmission lines and negatively impacted in perpetuity in ALL future production and development. (“Clean” Line’s fluff on the true impact of these massive towers and mega high-voltage lines deserves careful study and analysis in itself. Ask the folks who would really know- don’t count on the “testimony” of a private company hoping to make billions at our expense.) Furthermore, the majority of the landowners do not have the know-how nor the tremendous cash available to fight this private company.

    Worse yet, time and again, and across all projects, "Clean" Line has lobbied politicians and other sympathetic, “clean” groups with a kool-aid sales pitch long before landowners ever know that there is this significant threat to their hard-earned land. In Kansas, public utility status was granted before landowners were even aware of the project. In Illinois, “Clean” Line reps, including “Clean” Line’s vice-president Jayshree Desai, were still telling landowners they hadn’t yet applied to the Illinois Commerce Commission- 16 months after their initial filing in 2010. Kudos to the Illinois Commerce Commission for not allowing the initial docket to slide through while “Clean” Line representatives were still deliberately hiding the application from landowners.

    The majority of the on-going touted “600 meetings” (really highly watered-down and misleading sales pitches) are to sympathetic groups with no stake in the outcome- to rally “support.” The actual “stakeholders,” who take the time to look critically at the project and ask pointed questions about the slick sales pitch and exaggerated numbers from self-generated “studies,” find disturbing discrepancies in the highly generalized and attorney-filtered answers- very, very few of which are actually in writing or on record. Now why would that be? We asked RICL for answers to very pointed questions through our state and national representative offices months ago, but have received no answers. Now why would that be?

    States and communities, far away from the landowners who are being forced to pay a high price with no benefits, are expecting the landowners to put up with these long-haul aerial transmission lines. Cape Cod residents and Virginia horse farmers don’t want aerial sewers to impede their view, yet thousands of landowners are expected to live, work, and sacrifice their health, investments, and income for these folks?

    Put the generation near the consumer and bury the lines along PUBLIC easements. Invest instead in distributed generation and energy efficiency. Why promote the movement of west to east of ALL kinds of power, including coal and gas, for maybe 30-40% of wind energy at the expense of landowners without the political connections and unlimited money to protect their hard-earned investments and income source?

    Essentially, “Clean” Line is picking the winners and losers in the farming business. In some years, the difference between having these massive transmission lines or not, can be the difference between surviving another year or losing the farm. (Again, ask the experts- don’t rely on “Clean” Line’s fairy tale and Detweiler’s laughable claim that “12 acres” would be impacted.) Per “Clean” Line’s contracts, farmers would also be liable for any accident and subsequent damages to the structures. Should an accident occur, the landowners would again be in danger of not only losing their lives, but also the farm.

    Who is expected to pay the price for whose gain? Lobbied for by whom? For the real benefit of politically connected wealthy East Coast consumers and a couple of billionaire investors at the expense of Illinois landowners who depend on their land for income and investment?

    Should “Clean” Line be allowed to proceed, there are serious concerns about the environmental justice in doing so. Please carefully consider the implications of your decision.

    PLEASE – STOP, STUDY and evaluate ALL of the proposed transmission lines in various stages of development in Illinois in the context of each other as Iowa is doing. (maps available on Block RILC website). The environmental injustice in just Rock Island “Clean” Line in monumental, but when combined with the injustice of ALL the proposed lines, it is catastrophic to the ILLINOIS consumer, taxpayer, and landowner.

    Mary Mauch
  • March 28, 2013

    I am opposed to allowing RICL Public Utility status. RICL is a privately held company with designs on taking prime agricultural land and diminishing the productivity of this land by limiting aerial spraying, promoting soil compaction and crushing or altering drainage tile for their own financial gain. RICL poses no real positive impact on the citizens of Illinois. To allow RICL, Public Utility Status, would be doing a great injustice to the farm families located along its proposed route and ultimately to the citizens of Illinois.
    Daryl Sondgeroth
  • March 28, 2013

    RICL should not be granted public utility / convenience status. This line is not needed in the state of IL and eastern states are not interested in having power generated in another state by a PRIVATELY held company. The long term negative effects on the prime farm ground it will cross is unmeasurable. Do not allow RICL access to interfere with our livelihood.
    Kevin & Carol Cassidy
  • March 28, 2013

    NOT TO POST: Just to let you know that there is an error in the comments running two comments together under one date. Thank you.

    On the Feb. 28th
    How many more sweetheart deals have already been made to the wind industry beyond those listed above.” Scott A. Thorsen
    This is a National issue but Illinois Commerce Commission, you have the option to STOP and come up with a plan to deal with it NOW before Illinois farmland is sacrificed forever.
    Respectfully submitted by Susan Sack, Mendota, Illinois.
    12-0560 · sack_susan@yahoo.com

    Mary Mauch
  • March 28, 2013

    I am asking that you please deny Rock Island Clean Line their request for public utility status. Instead of letting these power companies run wild through Illinois farmland, crisscrossing the state, we need to have a comprehensive plan for ALL the power companies. It by no means is attractive to have these massive power lines randomly strewn all over the state.
    Isaiah Jones
  • March 28, 2013

    I am asking you to reject the application of Rock Island Clean Line to become a public utility. This is a private corporation which proposes to construct a high voltage electric line across Illinois' valuable and nonrenewable farm land. The eastern states do not want to receive this electricity. It will not bring jobs to Il. as they are very specialized and skilled jobs which will be performed by their own trained employees. We are being told by those who have studied clean (green) energy that it is not working, not productive, extremely expensive and not needed. It requires much government subsidy to continue which we CANNOT afford. We are told that the amount of natural gas in our country is extensive and should be used instead of the very inefficient wind power. Today is an extremely windy day in northern Illinois and only a few of the wind towers near my home are working. Why? We are told that they only produce a very small percentage of power. Why should wind power be transferred across the country when every state and area can produce its' own?? I thank you in advance for doing the right thing and stopping this out of state company from ruining 12,000 acres of our precious land. Please take the dollar signs out of the equation and vote in the best interests of the citizens instead of the money involved.
    Docket 12-0560

    Madra Fischer
  • March 22, 2013

    I am a landowner who has been contacted by Rock Island Clean Line. The company proposes to build huge transmission lines across my farmland south of Triumph, IL. They sent an example of a proposal with a onetime cash settlement for placing poles taller than the Statue of Liberty on my land. Signing their contract would give RICL easements and access across my property for perpetuity. I do not want to sign RICL’s contract.
    This land was willed to my late husband, Bob, and I about 50 years ago and with it came a responsibility. The land was tiled in the 1970’s and became the drainage system for neighboring farmland and the town of Triumph. The people of Triumph depend on my tile system working correctly to help avoid flooding. I do not wish to chance disrupting the drainage. My husband was very aware of this responsibility to the town and other area farmers and made sure I was aware of it before he passed away in 1986. I pay for a drainage district through my property taxes and my tiles empty into a drainage ditch that then carries the water past the quarry and into the Tomahawk Creek. I do not want my property to be crossed by heavy machinery needed to bring in steel and concrete and erect lines or repair them. Tiles can be crushed. With easements forever this could happen at any time in the future. This is an issue that could affect my descendants who will inherit the land and everyone who lives in Triumph or has farmland that drains through my land. I own the ground and should have the right to say no to this liability.
    I appose Rock Island Clean Line's request to be considered a public utility.They are private investors and should not be given public utility status and the right to apply to use eminent domain.

    Dorothy Becker
  • March 22, 2013

    I ask that the ICC deny the request of Rock Island Clean Line (case12-0560) to obtain public utility status. I am against this project.
    We do not need to establish another unnecessary electrical grid in Illinois which will take prime farm land out of production. The construction of this grid will result in the compaction of the soil on my farm, and will result in broken farm drain tiles caused by the heavy equipment used to construct the towers for this grid. These towers will also hinder my ability to apply chemical crop application via crop dusting, and result in the unwanted creation of production lowering easements needed to service the towers. Just the sight of these eyesores on the local topography is reason enough to not want this project here. Rock Island Clean Line not a public utility. It has no land, employed linemen or equipment. It is a vulture capital company seeking to use eminent domain to take my property for their private financial gain. The ICC should deny RICL’s request to obtain public utility status base on the merits which there seem to be few.

    Kenneth Funfsinn
  • March 22, 2013

    As one of the members in an organization now spanning multiple states and three of "Clean" Line Energy Partners, LLC's projects, we would ask you to carefully consider the environmental justice implications in allowing this private company the right to plow through private land for private gain.

    We do not believe that it is an accident that "Clean" Line's projects go through the heart of the least politically connected populations of each state. Carefully consider that a significant percentage of landowners are families or senior citizens- relying on the income from the hard-earned land that is significantly devalued by monstrous transmission lines and negatively impacted in perpetuity in ALL future production and development. (Clean Line's fluff on the true impact of these massive towers and mega high-voltage lines deserves careful study and analysis in itself. Ask the folks who would really know- don't count on the "testimony" of a private company hoping to make billions at our expense.) Furthermore, the majority of the landowners do not have the know-how nor the tremendous cash available to fight this private company.

    Worse yet, time and again, and across all projects, "Clean" Line has lobbied politicians and other sympathetic, "clean" groups with a kool-aid sales pitch long before landowners ever know that there is this significant threat to their hard-earned land. In Kansas, public utility status was granted before landowners were even aware of the project. In Illinois, "Clean" Line reps, including "Clean" Line's vice-president Jayshree Desai, were still telling landowners they hadn't yet applied to the Illinois Commerce Commission- 16 months after their initial filing in 2010. Kudos to the Illinois Commerce Commission for not allowing the initial docket to slide through while "Clean" Line representatives were still deliberately hiding the application from landowners.

    The majority of the on-going touted "600 meetings" (really highly watered-down and misleading sales pitches) are to sympathetic groups with no stake in the outcome- to rally "support". The actual "stakeholders" who take the time to look critically at the project and ask pointed questions about the slick sales pitch and exaggerated numbers from self-generated "studies" find disturbing discrepancies in the highly generalized and attorney-filtered answers- very, very few of which are actually in writing or on record. Now why would that be? We asked RICL for answers to very pointed questions through our state and national representative offices months ago, but have received no answers. Now why would that be?

    States and communities, far away from the landowners who are being forced to pay a high price with no benefits, are expecting the landowners to put up with these long-haul aerial transmission lines. Cape Cod residents and Virginia horse farmers don't want aerial sewers to impede their view, yet thousands of landowners are expected to live, work, and sacrifice their health, investments, and income for these folks?

    Put the generation near the consumer and bury the lines along PUBLIC easements. Invest instead in distributed generation and energy efficiency. Why promote the movement of west to east of ALL kinds of power, including coal and gas, for maybe 30-40% of wind energy at the expense of landowners without the political connections and unlimited money to protect their hard-earned investments and income source?

    Essentially, "Clean" Line is picking the winners and losers in the farming business. In some years, the difference between having these massive transmission lines or not, can be the difference between surviving another year or losing the farm. (Again, ask the experts- don't rely on "Clean" Line's fairy tale and Detweiler's laughable claim that "12 acres" would be impacted.) Per "Clean" Line"s contracts, farmers would also be liable for any accident and subsequent damages to the structures. Should an accident occur, the landowners would again be in danger of not only losing their lives, but also the farm.

    Who is expected to pay the price for whose gain? Lobbied for by whom? For the real benefit of politically connected wealthy East Coast consumers and a couple of billionaire investors at the expense of Illinois landowners who depend on their land for income and investment?

    Should "Clean" Line be allowed to proceed, there are serious concerns about the environmental justice in doing so. Please carefully consider the implications of your decision.

    PLEASE STOP, STUDY and evaluate ALL of the proposed transmission lines in various stages of development in Illinois in the context of each other as Iowa is doing. The environmental injustice in just Rock Island "Clean" Line in monumental, but when combined with the injustice of ALL the proposed lines, it is catastrophic to the ILLINOIS consumer, taxpayer, and landowner.

  • March 19, 2013

    PLEASE DO NOT GRANT UTILITY STATUS TO "RICL",BECAUSE IT WILL NOT BENEFIT THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, AS THEY HAVE NO ASSOCIATION WITH ANYTHING IN THE STATE OTHER THAN WANTING TO TAKE PRIVATE PROPERTY, FOR THEIR OWN GAIN, THROUGH "EMINENT DOMAIN". ILLINOIS COMMERCE DOCKET NUMBER 12-056O
    Ronald J. Sanye
  • March 18, 2013

    We are destroying renewable enegry, farm land, to build this thing. Only in Illinois would that even be considered.
  • March 12, 2013

    Please transfer ALL the numberous phone calls, letters, E-Mails from Petition 10-0579 to Petition 12-0560.
    Why should the people of Illinois who are directly impacted by Rock Island Clean Line be penalize?
    If RICL could reapply it is only right the Illinois vices under 10-0579 be heard since the company name and the tranmission theme has not changed
    Did RICL refile in hopes to quiet the voices of Illinois Business: Agriculture, Wind, Small Public Utitities. Quiet the voices of Illinois workers: working on the railroads, nuclear plants, the coal and gas industry.
    Did RICL refile due to sloppy presentation?If so, what kind of Company are they. Is this to expect in the future?
    You have been generous in letting RICL refile.
    Can't you be fair to the people of Illinois and let their voices be transfer from Docket 10-0579 to Docket 12-0560.
    Thank You

    .

    Julie Auchstetterj
  • March 6, 2013

    Please oppose this petition on the grounds that it will take away my rights to do what I may wish with my land. A private company should not be given the right of eminent domain and determine what is best for my land. I have chosen to follow through with my plans which I have had since 2006 to put up a pivot irrigation system. RICL project would take away my rights. Therefore, please oppose this petition. I plan to use my farmland to feed the world. I farm in Loraine Twp, Sec. 5 and Sec 6 in Henry Co. IL.
    Kurt Wirth
  • February 28, 2013

    Regarding docket 12-0560
    I fully support the motion to dismiss as filed by the Illinois Landowners Alliance and the Illinois Agriculture Association.
    Roger M. Smith
    02/28/2013

    Roger M. Smith
  • February 28, 2013

    please do not allow RICL to be run. It is robbing a lot of private landowners of their properties for the benefit of somebody with an over-grandiose idea. The people will remain robbed of their lands long after the RICL project collapses under its unrealistic expectations. If somebody 500 miles west of us wants to make clean energy, let them sell it to somebody within a 50 mile radius of the generating devices. I really appreciate the opportunity to tell you this. Thank goodness for democracy. thanks!
    henry maze
  • February 28, 2013

    I would like to express opposition to the transmission project proposed in Docket # 12-0560
    I am asking the ICC members to stop this proposed transmission line project as well as the many others being proposed to cross Illinois carrying “clean energy” from western wind farms. Please study ALL proposed lines collectively and then determine what is in the BEST interest of Illinois Citizen’s. I do not oppose clean energy but I do oppose the “pigs at a feeding trough” mentality of investors counting on eastern state renewable energy portfolios to make them money.
    I’m a volunteer with BlockRICL, www.BlockRICL.com, and I strongly believe this is not just an issue of NIMBY’s “Not In MY Back Yard” citizens but ALL taxpaying citizens and land owners. Illinois is now facing many potential transmission line routes.
    California is meeting their renewable energy portfolio with in state solar and wind incentives raising questions as to why as a country we need to transmit “wind energy” long distances at all. Certainly the east coast market has proven disinterest by 10 governors writing Congress twice saying they do not want to buy expensive electricity produced further west but would prefer developing renewable energy instate to meet their clean energy portfolios This would provide jobs within their own state and bring development and industry to their state while supplying a product near the load zone.
    Doesn’t it seem sensible to create clean electricity near the load areas where it will be used? Off shore wind and turbines turned by water currents off shore or in rivers makes so much more sense for the east coast. Even off shore Great Lakes wind farms make more sense and we have California’s model for developing consumer incentives to meet the renewable goals. Do we really need to take valuable farm land out of production and place the economic burden for east coast energy on the Illinois citizen’s back? Farm land is a nonrenewable resource!
    My fellow Block Rock Island Clean Line volunteer, Scott Thorsen summed up my opinion on the issue of economics of wind energy in his following blog;
    “How much more must we sacrifice for "clean" energy?

    The Wind Industry said they need PURPA so real electric companies would be forced to buy their energy. We gave them PURPA.

    The Wind Industry said they need a subsidy, so we gave them the Production Tax Credit and the Investment Tax Credit.

    The Wind Industry said they need PUCHA abolished to get more investors in powerlines for “clean” energy. We scrapped President Roosevelt’s PUHCA.

    The Wind Industry said they need Renewable Portfolio Standards as a policy to mandate 25% renewable energy by 2025. We gave them the RPS.

    The Wind Industry said they need 20 Year Power Purchasing Contracts. We gave them 20 year Power Purchasing Contracts at 184% the current market value for energy.

    Now the Wind Industry says they need superhighway powerlines from Iowa to get the energy to the east coast.

    Now the Wind Industry says they need federal eminent domain for powerlines.

    When is it enough? How much more do I need to give the owners of these windmills?

    Show me a wind company that is going out of business. Show me a wind company that isn’t making money. How do you think Michael Zilhka, the financer of Clean Line Energy made his billions from his millions? Wind Energy.

    If Renewable Portfolio Standards are not frozen, in 2025 we are going to have 25% of our energy as unregulated “renewable” and “clean” energy. These “clean” energy companies are exempt from all the regulations coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, and all other energy manufacturers must work and abide by.

    By 2025 the largest player in the energy business (wind energy) will be left unchecked and all other energy manufactures will be scrapping for income around this out of control monster.

    Now is not the time to put 2 giant 3,500MW powerline’s through Illinois for this unregulated child of the energy industry. We are creating a huge potential for abuse with market trading and greater instability with these monsters. Enron will be considered a smalltime country bank armed robbery compared to the road we are headed down with wind energy, Grain Belt Express, and the Rock Island Clean Line Project. Now is the time to freeze the Renewable Portfolio Standard, freeze any expansion of transmission for specifically for “clean” energy, and start regulating these companies like the rest of the energy industry.

    We have paid enough of our money to these “clean” energy companies. It’s time to regulate their greed before it’s too late.

    How many more sweetheart deals have already been made to the wind industry beyond those listed above.” Scott A. Thorsen
    This is a National issue but Illinois Commerce Commission, you have the option to STOP and come up with a plan to deal with it NOW before Illinois farmland is sacrificed forever.
    Respectfully submitted by Susan Sack, Mendota, Illinois.

    sack_susan@yahoo.com
  • February 28, 2013

    Coming from a Midwestern farming family, I know the troubles encountered by many private invester projects clashing with farm land, this is why I am opposed to ICC docket number 12-0560. My family personally has been subjected to this problem a few times in the past. One was when Ameren put its powerlines in by interstate 80 at the Utica exit. Though we lost no farm land, we were impacted by the way they put them in, they drove through the field that we cash rent, taking and compacting usable farmland. This was 2 years ago and with rigerous working of that 30 foot strip of land along the field, we have yet to get the compaction out. Now imagine this for 500 miles, not all through farmland no doubt, but most being straight through fields. The 200 foot easements will be compacted leading to drainage problems for the surrounding area, potentially creating water holes which are devestating to farmers as such that no crops in the midwest can grow in standing water. Knowing how large these posts are, I fear to think of how much compaction they will create in the easements and access roads, effectively declining the use of that land and creating drainage problems. For years to come that compaction will remain, decreasing surrounding fiels productivity.
    Another concern is the land they require. One of the leading problems in agriculture is how we are going to keep up with the exponentially growing population of the United States, along with the rest of the world. Taking more farmland for clean energy will not only hurt government finances by decreasing property taxes, but also that with less farmland, we will have less crop to export. Being one of our major exports, does this seem like a good idea to cut down on our exports while the number of imports is ever increasing? They say they will need a 200 foot easement, but lets think about this. 200 foot easement effectively means 400 feet total around the 200 foot lattice structures when talking about constructions. Due to the fact that the poles require enough land on each side to fall over without impeding other constructions. The poles being 200 feet tall also add eyesore to the land when they are not neccessary, as the fact that the windfarms that they will be servicing are not started yet, nor are they to be completed until a a later date. An estimated 2000 turbines would have to spring up in Iowa, effectively taking 100 square miles, and taking prime farmland out of production. So they project. I ask you this, what energy do they plan on putting through these lines?
    The private company is putting it in under the guise of clean energy for windfarms, however; Iowa interjected that they would not allow the company to carry pure wind energy, due to the distinct possibility that they need a backup flow from fossil and nuclear fules through the same lines to prevent power shortage when the wind isnt blowing. The chances are that the majority of the energy passing through these lines would be your run of the mill, "unclean" energy. I, a highschooler, wonder this, how are we to determine wether the energy run through the lines meets the renewable standards imposed by the individual states being supplied by the PJM grid?
    The most important reason to prevent this line running through however is not the loss of projected income, nor of the political influence, but the safety of the residents along the line. RICL has not been able to prove with case studies that dc power overhead lines are not influential with personal wellbeing. They have not even bothered with projections. I, being a detassler, have personal experience woking under high voltage lines, and I can gaurantee that it is not like being outside during a thunder storm, as a representative from RICL stated. The electricity in the air is the same as a severe thunderstorm, however; in a thunder storm you do not hear a constant nerve racking zaping sound, you do not feel the thrum of the powerelines as a tangable pulsing, and most of all, you do not have to worry about a live line wretching loose in a high wind and falling to the ground. Though the other reasons give credit to blocking RICL's advance through our land, the saftey risks it poses to present and future generations of people living around it is the strongest reason I oppose the RICL's projected proposition.

    Ethan Sack
  • February 28, 2013

    California established its renewable portfolio -- that portion of the state's energy purchases that must come from renewable sources -- in 2002, and expanded it in 2006 to a target of 33 percent by 2020. But on Jan. 13,2011 California's Public Utilities Commission decided that 75 percent of the renewable portfolio must come from in-state sources, to encourage home-grown development of wind and solar. Authorities now think that California will be able to fulfill its renewable requirements without importing energy from states like Montana and Wyoming.
    Do we need wind energy transmitted long distances? There is a national trend to place renewable resource sources near the load center. 10 east coast Governors have already written congress twice asking to develop renewable sources within their states and not have to import expensive electricity from the west. Off shore wind farms are a viable alternative as are turbine that generate electricity by tital activity.Certainly California's model for encouraging home grown,in state renewables can be considered.
    The renewable portfolios can be filled more efficiently and at lower cost if done near the load areas.
    Please consider this National trend and deny Rock Island Clean Line's application. The public needs do not warrant these lines.

    Susan Sack
  • February 28, 2013

    We are OPPOSSED to the petition for an Order granting Rock Island Clean Line LLC a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity pursuant to Section 8-406 of the Public Utilities Act as a Transmission Public Utility and to Construct, Operate and Maintain an Electric Transmission Line and Authorizing and Directing Rock Island Clean Line pursuant to Section 8-503 if the Public Utilities Act to Construct an Electric Transimssion Line.
    Joe & Martha Dankenbring
  • February 19, 2013

    I oppose the Rock Island Clean Line project. Docket 12-0560

    How much more must we sacrifice for "clean" energy?

    The Wind Industry said they need PURPA so real electric companies would be forced to buy their energy. We gave them PURPA.

    The Wind Industry said they need a subsidy, so we gave them the Production Tax Credit and the Investment Tax Credit.

    The Wind Industry said they need PUCHA abolished to get more investors in powerlines for “clean” energy. We scrapped President Roosevelt’s PUHCA.

    The Wind Industry said they need Renewable Portfolio Standards as a policy to mandate 25% renewable energy by 2025. We gave them the RPS.

    The Wind Industry said they need 20 Year Power Purchasing Contracts. We gave them 20 year Power Purchasing Contracts at 184% the current market value for energy.

    Now the Wind Industry says they need superhighway powerlines from Iowa to get the energy to the east coast.

    Now the Wind Industry says they need federal eminent domain for powerlines.

    When is it enough? How much more do I need to give the owners of these windmills?

    Show me a wind company that is going out of business. Show me a wind company that isn’t making money. How do you think Michael Zilhka, the financer of Clean Line Energy made his billions from his millions? Wind Energy.

    If Renewable Portfolio Standards are not frozen, in 2025 we are going to have 25% of our energy as unregulated “renewable” and “clean” energy. These “clean” energy companies are exempt from all the regulations coal, nuclear, natural gas, hydro, and all other energy manufacturers must work and abide by.

    By 2025 the largest player in the energy business (wind energy) will be left unchecked and all other energy manufactures will be scrapping for income around this out of control monster.

    Now is not the time to put 2 giant 3,500MW powerline’s through Illinois for this unregulated child of the energy industry. We are creating a huge potential for abuse with market trading and grater instability with these monsters. Enron will be considered a smalltime country bank armed robbery compared to the road we are headed down with wind energy, Grain Belt Express, and the Rock Island Clean Line Project. Now is the time to freeze the Renewable Portfolio Standard, freeze any expansion of transmission for specifically for “clean” energy, and start regulating these companies like the rest of the energy industry.

    We have paid enough of our money to these “clean” energy companies. It’s time to regulate their greed before it’s too late.

    How many more sweetheart deals have already been made to the wind industry beyond those listed above?

    Scott A Thorsen
  • February 19, 2013

    February 18, 2013

    Per a letter received 12-24-2012 I documented my personal inability to attend the prehearing conference scheduled in Springfield, IL on January 8, 2013. The content is essentially the same as herein.

    To: ICC - 12-0560

    Subject: Rock Island Clean Line LLC Permission to construct, operate maintain electric transmission line – Bureau County landowner – Property (34 TWN,18 Rng, Blk 9, W12NE B806P598 D94-945 (80 ac)

    My work as a senior staff engineer at Oak Ridge National Lab in Tennessee precludes attendance, as does the cost for travel. As the owner it is my desire to leave the land intact for 100% grain farming application and I do not approve of the Rock Island Clean Line plan. The power distribution benefits will not accrue to the landowner, but rather will be at a cost to the land owner in Bureau County. If such an Order is granted by the government to Rock Island Clean Line then I, as land owner, demand that I be paid the equivalent of the maximum benefit paid per acre, and per annum fixed fee, as is paid to any landowner across all the states involved. I requested that the ICC, as a matter of record, pass this letter on to Rock Island Clean Line LLC. I am against the project and against having any interface with my property. From an engineering cost/benefit perspective I much favor localized power distribution versus accepting the I2R losses over long transmission lines. This long transmission line option is favored because of one community/region allowing the power source infrastructure and then the NEPA process is driven because of that positive front-end step. One must carefully evaluate that public sentiment favors the decision at both ends, which includes the company receiving a bottom line return on investment. The timing does not allow for fair assessment by both sides and that should be a lesson for future similar projects. The extensive opposition, documented by the stalwart citizens and groups responding to comment,is clear objective evidence of that statement as fact.

    The basis for my disagreement includes the long term economic impacts. Property in northern Illinois Bureau County has increased in value in double digits per year for years now, and will continue to do so as an average trend over the course of my children’s lives. The price per acre therefore must be at a minimum the equivalent of $ 100,000 to serve the long-term operation over 40 years; typical process facility life and timely when our children and theirs will have inherited this valuable asset. This land is as good and productive as lays outdoors. The farming rental income is as competetive as any in the state and increasing annually. The tenant in Bureau County is an exceptional farmer and steward of the land and does not concur with the proposed technical bases that the land-yield-productivity is not negatively impacted. The resources for long-term maintenance of such a power line are not evident as being in place. Aerial crop dusting/spraying application is important and this project cripples that useful technique as an option. The most recent package issued from Rock Island Clean Line LLC contained letter correspondence addressed to a different landowner, reflective of mass mailings and poor organization. The farmers I have spoken with are expert and are against the project on technical terms, as well as the negative eye sore aesthetics by the disruption to the farming landscape.

    Sincerely,

    Bill Hermes – owner/landlord – 510 E. Fox Den Dr. Knoxville, Tn 37934

    Bill Hermes
  • February 19, 2013

    The Rock Island project is huge and could really change the game for the future as far as environmentally conscious efforts and transfers of energy in the right direction. I support the effort and so should you.
    Jason Radford
  • February 14, 2013

    The Grundy County Farm Bureau Board of Directors is publicly announcing the opposition to the Rock Island Clean electric transmission project proposed across Northern Illinois. We request that you deny the application for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity as stated in Docket No. 12-0560.

    Our opposition to this project is based on these points:
    1) Clean Line is a private entity. Therefore, they should not be granted public utility status as the company requests.
    2) Eminent domain authority should be denied because this is not a public utility. This project would be taking private land for the purpose of private gain.
    3) As landowners, we are concerned about the loss of farmland/production through the use of lattice pole support structures for this project.
    4) The route of the proposed line is of concern because the project will cross over productive farm ground, through many property lines, and will result in unnecessary acreage being taken out of production.

    Given the above concerns about the proposed project we respectfully request the Illinois Commerce Commission deny the application for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity to the Clean Line Energy Partners.

    Grundy County Farm Bureau
  • February 14, 2013

    We oppose Rock Island Clean Line's unnecessary attempts to further their efforts in removing valuable farmland from production now and in the future. It's priceless!
    Ronald and Kathryn Brunoehler
  • February 7, 2013

    I am deeply troubled by Clean Line Energy's lack of honesty and transparency with the Rock Island Clean Line Project and I oppose Rock Island Clean Line, Docket 12-0560.

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20120519/ISSUE01/305199980/helping-hans

    Looking back at this article from Crain's Chicago Business from last summer, Hans Detweielr, the public representative for Clean Line Energy claimed consumers and ratepayers will not be paying for the Merchant Transmission Line.

    Hans Detwieler said;
    " Unlike most transmission lines, which are built only after regulators agree to force ratepayers to finance them through higher electric bills, Clean Line is a “merchant” project, which means it would be privately financed."

    Yet as soon as September 2012, Clean Line Energy was asking PJM for cost allocation to captive Illinois customers.

    Was it Clean Line Energy's intent all along to force Illinois consumers to pay for their powerline?

    Was Clean Line Energy playing bait-&-switch?

    Hand Detweleir, in the same article claimed the company has held 600 public meeting with a lot of pulled pork sandwiches. TO guote the article;

    "Since he began promoting the project in January 2010, he figures he has presided over or attended more than 600 meetings. “We've served several thousand pulled-pork sandwiches,” he jokes."

    HDR Engineering conducted only 26 public meetings for the Rock Island Clean Line. Those meeting were under a previous ICC docket number which Clean Line Energy withdrew. This is far short of the claim by Clean Line Energy's spokesman Hans Detwelier. (Pulled pork sandwiches were also not served at the meeting I attended.)

    Clean Line has yet to hold public meeting under docket 12-0560.

    The article also claimed Clean Line Energy has made an agreement with Grundy County. This also has not been confirmed.

    I believe Clean Line Energy needs to come back to Northern Illinois under Docket 12-0560 and explain this project to the public. Micheal Skelly needs to explain why we should be forced to pay for their privately owner venture capital merchant transmission line. What happened to the billionaire investors in this project? Whay can't they pay for this proposed project?

    In documents to FERC, Clean Line Energy had claimed this project was not relevant to future planning to PJM. Now that RICL has received FERC approval, Clean Line Energy is now claiming the project is relevant to future planing in the PJM marketplace.

    These maneuvers is absolutely ridiculous RICL. The company's lack of transparency and lack of truthyness to Illinois consumers in the planning stage of this project are red flags to the perils of this project to Illinois consumers and our energy bills.

    Michael Skelly will not even stand before Illinois consumers and tell us how much this wind energy from Iowa will cost, but expect us to believe this project is "good" for Illinois.

    Yes,these questions and many more need to be answered by RICL at Springfield before the ICC, but RICL also needs to hold public meeting for Docket 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL public utility status in Illinois. We don't need the cost of this powerline added to our utility bills. We don't need wind energy from Iowa, We don't need overpriced energy when there are more economical alternatives.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Scott Thorsen
  • February 7, 2013

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line Docket No. 12 0560
    Please deny Rock Island Clean Line a certificate of "Public Convenience and Necessity." RICL has no intention of ever serving as a public utility company in Illinois. Ill. will see no long term benefit from this project. The project will ruin thousands of acres of prime, non-renewable farmland, which future generations will need for food production. Companies such as RICL should not have the right to take privately owned land for the private gain of their investors.

    Gary Cody
  • February 1, 2013

    I'm in favor of this petition. All must do what we can to insure a renewable source of power that is clean, not adding to the global warming.
    Andrew J. Neill
  • February 1, 2013

    I am a huge fan of Rock Island Clean Line and their projects!
    Sean Liu
  • February 1, 2013

    I think that clean energy is the way of the futrure. And leading the way would be wind energy. I would like to see more turbines being used through out the state. Turbines are clean , quiet, and safe.
    Adam Yakush
  • February 1, 2013

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental, health, and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Respectfully,,
    Roger M. Smith
    1/31/2013

    Roger M. Smith
  • January 30, 2013

    I would like to urge you to deny Rock Island Clean Line's request to become a regulated utility. As a LaSalle County farm owner, I strongly oppose the taking of private, prime farmland in perpetuity for this private company. The few temporary jobs it may create will not outweigh the many negative impacts of this transmission project for Illinois farmers and residents. These power lines are not needed. Please block RICL.
    Marlys Scarbrough
  • January 30, 2013

    On behalf of the LaSalle county Farm Bureau, I am writing to voice our opposition to the Rock Island Clean Line Energy project acquiring public utility status. There are several issues as to why we feel their petition should be denied.

    First of all, Rock Island Clean Line Energy is a private company that should not be granted public utility status. Most importantly, it should be denied eminent domain authority.

    In the past few years, our state has seen a significant increase in the number of wind farms erected to provide electricity locally. We feel that if these existing wind farms could run at capacity they would provide enough electricity to meet the needs of the grid system that Clean Line is hoping to supply. Farmland is our most valuable resource and taking land out of production for such a project is unwarranted. Clean Line is requesting that much of their proposed transmission line be constructed diagonally across prime farmland. We feel this is totally unnecessary.

    If the company is allowed to construct, it should be required to place the transmission line along the Interstate 80 right-of-way, which would avoid taking valuable farmland out of production. It is for these reasons that the LaSalle County Farm Bureau respectfully requests that the Rock Island Clean Line Energy project be denied a permit to construct.

    Monty Whipple
    President
    LaSalle County Farm Bureau

    Monty Whipple
  • January 30, 2013

    On behalf of the LaSalle county Farm Bureau, I am writing to voice our opposition to the Rock Island Clean Line Energy project acquiring public utility status. There are several issues as to why we feel their petition should be denied.

    First of all, Rock Island Clean Line Energy is a private company that should not be granted public utility status. Most importantly, it should be denied eminent domain authority.

    In the past few years, our state has seen a significant increase in the number of wind farms erected to provide electricity locally. We feel that if these existing wind farms could run at capacity they would provide enough electricity to meet the needs of the grid system that Clean Line is hoping to supply. Farmland is our most valuable resource and taking land out of production for such a project is unwarranted. Clean Line is requesting that much of their proposed transmission line be constructed diagonally across prime farmland. We feel this is totally unnecessary.

    If the company is allowed to construct, it should be required to place the transmission line along the Interstate 80 right-of-way, which would avoid taking valuable farmland out of production. It is for these reasons that the LaSalle County Farm Bureau respectfully requests that the Rock Island Clean Line Energy project be denied a permit to construct.

    Monty Whipple
    President
    LaSalle County Farm Bureau

    Monty Whipple
  • January 30, 2013

    I strongly disagree with the approval of this project and I am against it. Illinois ratepayers will in no way benefit from this and should not be held to pay for its construction. Its absurd to think that it will lower the cost of electricity for Illinois residents when prices are already as low as they are. Illinois already has an adequate supply of clean base load electricity in our nuclear plants. It's pretty bad when you have to try to sell your expensive electricity to other states, because your own state doesn't want to pay for it. The approval of this project would only jeopardize good paying jobs at power plants in our own state at the expense of a few people making a ton of money off subsidies.
    So with the Illinois ratepayers in mind, please do not approve this project. Rock Island Clean Line does not have the Illinois ratepayers in their best interest.

    Justin Wall
  • January 30, 2013

    I am in favor of granting Rock Island Clean Line LLC its request for a certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity. I believe the nation is poised to make a significant shift in relying more on renewable energy in its energy portfolio. Illinois is critical in developing this new national infrastructure. Please do what is necessary to facilitate the growth of this sector of the renewable energy system.
    Andy Neill
  • January 30, 2013

    I support and care about this project.
    Kendall Spiek
  • January 30, 2013

    The Rock Island Clean Line is an opportunity that MUST be taken advantage of and acted upon. Rarely do we find such an ideal combination of factors that will make a meaningful economic and environmental impact. Please support Rock Island Clean Line's work.
    Michael Schaefer
  • January 30, 2013

    RICL has repeatedly stated that this power line will bring lasting benefits to IL residents and communities. I disagree. I would imagine that construction will likely be carried out relatively quickly by numerous subcontractors which, given the highly specialized nature of this work, may or may not be local or even from Illinois. With regard to operations of the line once completed, it looks like these jobs will not bring much, if any, benefit to local Illinois communities. Wayne Galli, who oversees and is responsible for the planning, engineering, design, construction and other technical activities of Clean Line and its subsidiaries, testified before the Illinois Commerce Commission that “Rock Island has committed to turn over functional control of the Rock Island Project, including scheduling, to an RTO [Regional Transmission Organization], which most likely will be PJM [an LLC] based in Pennsylvania.” Galli further stated the contract for line maintenance would be awarded to “a utility or utilities or with a firm that performs transmission line maintenance and construction services.” Do we know how many such firms are based in Illinois? Do they, or utilities, have experience maintaining HVDC lines (most lines in the US carry AC voltage)?

    I also have questions about RICL’s assertion that that this will be cheap power. Their study suggests an annual wholesale electricity savings of $320 million in the first year of the project’s operation. I get lost, however, when I think about a statement Michael Skelly (President of Clean Line) made at a clean energy conference in Chicago. He indicated that this project would not be economically feasible unless wholesale power prices rise by 50%. Current Illinois electricity prices are around $28 per MWh. 50% of $28 is $14. $28+$14=$42. Clean Line's own estimated cost of delivery is $64 per Megawatt hour (MWh). This means that even with a 50% rise of sales prices to $42 per MWh, Clean Line’s electricity still costs $22 more per MWh. Where, or how, does Clean Line arrive at the $320 million in energy savings? Clarification is needed.

    Paul Litow
  • January 30, 2013

    I'm a land owner who would lose farmable ground to access roads and 200-foot towers with AT LEAST 28-square-feet foot prints. RICL wants 200 ft. wide easements across my business forever. If privately owned RICL gets the Illinois Commerce Commission to grant them public utility status, as they have applied for under Docket 12-0560, they will then be able to apply for eminent domain meaning they would seize part of my farming business for "the good of the public". This proposed project will not benefit Illinoisans and 10 eastern governors have stated to Congress they don't wish to buy expensive western energy as they want to develop their own in-state energy using Federal Clean Energy Act stimulus money. What "public" will benefit from this private business venture by men from Texas and New York?

    In the mean time a taxpaying businessman that helps feed the world would lose his property. Some of my land would be unusuable for food production for perpetuity and surrounding farmable land would be impacted by soil compaction, weed issues, drainage issues, and GPS and aerial spraying disruption. My land value would depreciate affecting the counties tax base and shifting the burden to others. Furthermore, I would be liable for towers and disruption of electricity if damaged making them un-insurable. Would you want to have that liability forced upon you or have your private property seized?

    This is an issue of property owner rights. Why doesn't RICL use existing right-a-aways along railroads or highways if their claim to be necessary and safe to the public's health is true? Why take a route across private farmable land?

    Jeff Stevenson
  • January 24, 2013

    Dear Commerce Commission;

    I am writing with great concern about the Rock Island Clean Line asking to obtain a certificate of public convenience and eminent domain. This private company would be in direct competition with Illinois renewable energy development. It is my understanding Illinois residents are already committed to paying $3.2 billion to update our Illinois Grid. Plus this is essentially building and providing ways to send permanent renewable energy out of state to other states who have already said they do not want it but instead wish to develop their own renewable energy as we in Illinois should be doing. The jobs provided by it would be minimal since high voltage DC transmission line construction is highly specialized and can only be done by a few companies in the US. I do not feel this justifies taking out 12000 acres of Illinois prime farmland for perpetuity. This year's drought point out how we need this land to feed and supply our State and country from this non-renewable resource. We need to stand up for what's best for Illinois since our windfarms and grids cannot connect to it. Hence I don not see a public purpose for this project and no legal justification to authorize the taking of private land for private gain. Thank you for considering these thoughts as you make your decision.

    Sincerely,

    Roger and Barbara Kidd
    870 N. 41st Road
    Mendota, IL 61342

  • January 15, 2013

    We are totally against 12-0560 Rock Island Clean Line and respectfully ask that their petetion be denied for the following reasons:

    1. Illinois will gain no benefit from these proposed lines. No one in Illinois will have access to this energy as it is only a means of transmission through our state from west to east and as an added bonus we will pay higher energy costs because of it.

    2. No significant jobs will be created for Illinois workers.

    3. Agricultural land should not be disturbedm destroyed or taken by another entity.

    4. Interferrence for all wildlife in the immediate area--Horseback field trialers were abolished at Green River Wildlife Area years ago because it was feared that the sport was interferring with several endangered species. These lines would have far more devasting effects on wildlife than horses.

    In conclusion, the RICL petition should not be granted utility state or eminant domain authority. Deny it!!

    Ann and George Ihrke
  • January 15, 2013

    I am against 12-0560, the petition granting Rock Island Clean Line LLC a Certificate for a transmission line. We are a non-home rule community being forced to accept what the county tells us. Please do not allow the granting of this petition. What a waste of tax-payers money.
    Richard Flessner
  • January 7, 2013

    First, I do not believe that the width of the easement is enough to compensate the farmers for what will be taken. I talked with a crop duster and former 747 pilot several weeks ago and he told me that he did not believe that crop dusting pilots would fly within 200 feet of a high voltage power line, but he said that it could be as much as 300 feet. It is my understanding that the RICL easement will only be 100 feet from either side of the line. Second, the RICL will hug natural gas lines from La Moille all the way across the top of LaSalle County. I am concerned about that because a few years ago a natural gas line unexpectedly burst near Oakland, California. West of La Moille, the RICL stays well away from any pipelines except a several mile stretch. Third, I am concerned that other companies will attempt to use this easement in the future to construct other high voltage transmission lines, thereby making it impossible to effectively farm, dust, and live between it. How can the commission make sure that does not happen? Fourth, if we wanted to, how could we build a wind turbine if it would have to remain a certain distance away from the RICL? How would we be compensated for not being able to have a wind turbine? A wind turbine is unique because, unlike a barn or other surface level object, a setback is required between the wind turbine and objects that a wind turbine could potentially collapse onto. A setback between a wind turbine and a high voltage transmission line will be no less than the height of a wind turbine at the tip of its blade on top. That would be 500 feet. That is a taking that cannot be compensated by a 100 foot easement from either side of the RICL. Frankly, I am not sure how Illinois wind farms will be able to compete with wind farms on the Great Plains if RICL is constructed, but that issue is not of concern to me. What I do know is that the Illinois wind industry will be harmed if farmers alongside the easement(s) cannot have their own wind turbines. You probably have not thought about that taking. Farmers who have wind turbine leases are paid annually. My personal position is that wind turbines are not appropriate in counties that have or have recently had a growing population or great pastoral beauty, but the area where RICL will be built is very flat and has not grown in population since the baby boom. That is an appropriate location for wind turbines, if they work.
    Aaron Funfsinn
  • January 7, 2013

    Dear ICC,

    Obviously this project is bad for LaSalle County, but I am guessing it is very good for people working with Ziff Brothers of New York. It would be so much better if it could run along interstate 80. This would reduce the costs to LaSalle County alone by several thousand dollars for every mile every year, even at current levels. However, if the east coast wants to use offshore wind in the future, and not overpriced Iowa energy, then why are we even talking about this? If it would cost $30 to $40 per megawatt hour at current levels, the east coast would probably be more interested. If this project goes bankrupt, who gets stuck the most with the lost revenue? Not being part of the grid seems like it could create problems for Illinois as well.

    It is so much harder to farm around a tower, especially in the middle of a field. Perhaps what makes it worse is that there is nothing positive about them for the farmer, only negatives. Poles can be hit by equipment. It will be more difficult to spray with aerial equipment. You don't want a lot of weeds, but if a tower is hit with an implement it could be costly, especially if it causes a power outage. Telling employees, pesticide applicators and even yourself where they are takes time, especially if field operations occur at night. It is unbelievable how fast something comes up on you at night, even if you just saw it last round. The problems will likely exist even with future GPS systems, if the software is updated, or something is entered incorrectly, the result could be very costly. This can be seen in the cost or inability to procure aerial applicators due to increased insurance costs to apply pesticides in fields with towers. If higher crop yields are required in the future, irrigation will become increasingly more important. Towers may make this more difficult. It actually takes more time to farm around a tower today than it did 100 years ago when we were farming with horses.

    Crop yield will also be reduced where crops are driven over by equipment as well as the resulting farm equipment compaction every single year. Compaction from construction equipment can last for decades if it is done with poor soil conditions. Deep tillage won't alleviate the problem. Weeds that can handle compaction will grow where there is poor crop canopy, year after year. It will take time to fix broken clay tile that has been crushed by heavy equipment, but eventually this can be fixed.

    Having the power line along Interstate 80 would reduce many of the above problems, perhaps even making the project feasible.

    Thank you for reading this,
    Hal Hoelzer

    Hal Hoelzer
  • January 7, 2013

    Docket No. 12-0560 - I am opposed/against RICL constucting lines across prime farmland. Taking 12,000 acres of prime farmland is taking Illinois farmland which we need to keep in food production for feeding future generations. Illinois does NOT need these transmission lines nor does this company need to take away persons livlihood.
    Apparently this company does not realize that farmers grow crops or raise animals to feed their families.
    If they have so much money maybe they should invest it in our struggling schools that the state owes money to.
    Our farmers do NOT need farms taken away from them. We love the clean air of the countryside.

    C J Miller
  • January 7, 2013

    I am opposed to the transmission lines on my farm. There are two houses very close to the alternate route, and I am concerned for the homes occupants health issues. They may be in danger living so close. RICL wants to split my farm in middle, this will cause hardship for farming around the lines. It will depreciate the value of this farmland, these 10.6 acres will be out of production forever; and cause less income for the farmer. My main concern is that this is prime farmland and should not be taken out of our food production. We need this food for our future generations so they won't go hungry. Please rule against RICL plans to construct these facilities. We thank you for your time and thoughtful consideration in this matter. Sincerely ,Clifford and Geraldine Sondgeroth
    Clifford and Geraldine Sondgeroth
  • January 7, 2013

    I would urge you to deny Rock Island Clean Line's request to become a regulated utility. It will not benefit Ill. the few temporary jobs it creates does not outweigh the prime farmland it will take out of production.
    Steven Tuftie
  • January 7, 2013

    I would like to state that I am opposed to RICL and their proposal to file to the ICC for eminent domain. The proposed clean line has not shown that it is of benefit to the people of Illinois either in electric costs, ease of usage, proposed construction jobs or any other of the proposed benefits to the people of the state.
    Nancy L. Cassens
  • January 7, 2013

    The Bureau County Farm Bureau Board of Directors is opposed to the Rock Island Clean electric transmission project proposed across northern Illinois. The four primary reasons for the opposition are: 1.) Clean Line is a private entity and should not be granted public utility status as the company requests, 2.) Clean Line should be denied eminent domain authority as it would be taking private land for the purpose of private gain, 3.) Clean Line should not be allowed to use lattice pole support structures as it takes more valuable farmland out of production, 4.) Clean Line should use property lines rather than following a route that cuts diagonally across open farmland. Given the above concerns about the proposed project we respectfully request the Illinois Commerce Commission deny the application for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity to the Clean Line Energy Partners.
    Bureau County Farm Bureau
  • January 3, 2013

    log #3

    Customers opposition to the Rocket Island Clean Line

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    December 26, 2013
    ELIZABETH A. ROLANDO, CHIEF CLERK
    ILLINOIS COMMERCE COMMISSION
    527 EAST CAPITOL AVENUE
    SPRINGFIELD, IL 62701
    RE: DOCKET NO. 12-0560
    ~Ur
    I L Ll NOI S C0l1f'1ERCE
    COr;;,'~! S SI ON
    lUll DEC 3 I I A 10: 5.3
    ROCK ISLAND CLEAN LINE
    IN REGARD TO THE ABOVE DOCKET NO. 12-0560, ROCK ISLAND CLEAN
    LINE ENERGY, I HEREWITH EXPRESS MY OPPOSITION TO GRANTING RICL
    A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY.
    I AM A 67 YEAR OLD WIDOW WITH 23 ACRES, 20 OF WHICH ARE
    EXCELLENT TILLABLE ACRES ON WHICH I DEPEND TO SUPPLEMENT MY SS
    INCOME. MY HOME , YARD, ORCHARD AND OUTBUILDINGS OCCUPY THE
    OTHER 3 ACRES.
    1. I DO NOT BELIEVE THERE IS A NECESSITY FOR THIS CONSTRUCTION,
    AND THE ONL Y PEOPLE WHO STAND TO BENEFIT ARE RICL.
    2. ELECTRIC RATES FOR ME AND THE REST OF ILLINOIS WILL
    CERTAINLY NOT GO DOWN AS RICL WOULD HA VB US BELIEVE. A
    HIDDEN COST WILL APPEAR UNDER SOME OBSCURE HEADING ON
    OUR ELECTRIC BILL.
    3. MY PARTICULAR LAND LIES WITHIN THE LOCAL MORRIS AIRPORT
    AIR CORRIDOR AND TRANSMISSION LINES/TOWERS WILL
    SERIOUSLY ENDANGER THE DAY TO DAY AIR TRAFFIC, AND ALSO
    THE AERIAL CROP SPRAYING AS THE PILOTS NEED THAT SPACE TO
    ACCOMPLISH THEIR JOBS.
    4. THE VALUE OF MY PROPERTY WILL CERTAINLY GO DOWN WITH
    THE PRESENCE OF HYDC LINES IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY.
    5. NO ONE HAS BEEN ABLE TO PROVE THESE LINES DO NOT POSE A
    HEALTH PROBLEM. I HAVE A 3-YEAR OLD GRANDDAUGHTER
    LIVING WITH ME AND I QUESTION THE EFFECTS THIS WILL HAVE ON
    HER FUTURE HEALTH.
    6. THERE ARE CURRENTLY TOWERS AND LINES TO THE EAST, NORTH
    AND SOUTH OF ME., SURELY THESE ALREADY CONSTRUCTED LINES
    AND TOWERS COULD BE UTILIZED FOR THIS PROJECT.
    7. I OPPOSE THIS PROJECT BECAUSE I BELIEVE RICL, A PRIVATE
    GROUP, SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED THE RIGHT TO EMINENT
    DOMAIN.
    IN THE EVENT RIeL FILES UNDER ANOTHER DOCKET NUMBER, I REQUEST
    THAT MY COMMENTS BE TRANSFERRED TO THE NEW DOCKET NUMBER.
    PER MY PHONE CONVERSATION WITH MR. STEVE HICKEY, I AM
    REQUESTING THE PHONE NUMBER FOR TELEPHONE PARTICIPATION OF
    THE JANUARY 8, 2013 PREHEARING CONFERENCE. I ACCEPT ELECTRONIC
    SERVICE AT THE ADDRESS BELOW.
    VERY TRUL Y YOURS,
    ~~ EVEL~LLAND
    11230 N. State Route 47
    Morris, Illinois 60450
    Phone: 815942-2042
    Phone: 815274-0552

  • December 28, 2012

    Iam against RICL coming into Illinois.
    I am against any company that will not listen or be open to the people directly involved.
    Mr Morris Stover, head of RICL project engineering and procurement construction is quoted in Aug 31, 2012 Q-C Business Journel 'wE are going to impact farms." Since they are aware of this would't ' they want to at least lessen to the impact.,
    Illinois Farm Bureau and our Senator Rezin has suggested , if they get approval, to extend the lines along interstate 80. RICL said this not even at option. Their main reason was too many people live along busy, noisy 80. Maybe the reason is the Federal Gov't. doesn't want them on their land like we do not want them on private land?
    Has RICL even taken the time to count the number of people who will forced to live within one half mile of their proposed path?
    RICL does not care about the people of Illinois and especially is not concern about lessening the impact on Ill. farms."

    mary Auchstetter
  • December 28, 2012

    I oppose RICL being granted public Utility status and therefore by simply implementing procedural requirements the use of eminent domain by a private entity.
    The use of CLEAN is only a sales tool for this operator owned transmission line to gain limited creditability. In testimony to the ICC they admit that only in the inital season will they be able to, on a limited basis be able to control input to the line. After that it is only a transmission line and open to all suppliers not just renewables.

    The following is taken from RICL's testimony to the ICC.

    Rock Island’s anchor tenant process and open season process only govern the
    328 initial allocation of firm capacity on the Project. Rock Island’s ongoing obligations under
    329 its OATT will be substantially identical to the obligations of a traditional utility. The
    330 RTO that takes operational control of Rock Island’s transmission facilities will also
    331 administer Rock Island’s open access obligations. That same RTO will administer the
    332 open access obligations of its other member utilities that provide traditional, cost-based
    333 service.

    Chris Reynolds
  • December 28, 2012

    The Henry County Farm Bureau Board of Directors is opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line electric transmission project. We request that you deny the application for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity as stated in Docket No. 12-0560.
    Rock Island Clean Line, a private limited liability company, is not a public utility and should not be granted public utility status by the ICC. The proposed Rock Island Clean Line does not serve a public purpose and there is no validation to authorize the taking of private land for private gain. In addition, we strongly urge the ICC to deny the company any and all eminent domain authority.
    Illinois farmland is a non-renewable resource that should not be taken out of production by a private corporation for their own private gain. The agriculture industry is vital to the economy of our state and our farmers and landowners would be negatively impacted by the Rock Island Clean Line.
    We request that the Illinois Commerce Commission deny the application for the Rock Island Clean Line.

    Henry County Farm Bureau
  • December 21, 2012

    The Rock Island County Farm Bureau board of directors is opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line project proposed in northern Rock Island County. The three primary reasons for opposition include:
    1) Negative impacts to local farmers and landowners livelihood as it relates to agricultural production.
    2 A private entity seeking public utility status will set precedence as it relates to private property rights and eminent domain.
    3) Poor land use planning as it relates to the proposed route. Farmland is a scarce resource and continuing to take farmland out of production puts our US farmers at a disadvantage.
    In closing the energy being transferred among those lines will not positively impact our local and state energy supply.
    We respectfully request the Illinois Commerce Commission to deny the application for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity to the Clean Line Energy Partners.

    Rock Island County Farm Bureau
  • December 14, 2012

    Please reject any application regarding the Rock Island Clean Line. This action is another fleecing of our community, county, and state. The wind energy is a total waste of taxpayer dollars. As Senator Schummer from New York has identified, over 70% of the monies spent on wind energy and related activities has left the United States. This is another act of anti-coloniallism sponsored by the President and democratic congress. This entity should in no way be given utility status and absolutely no eminent domain powers. This would be a travesty at its highest level. I expect a vote to fully reject this petition. Thank you in advance.
    Dwayne Anderson
  • December 11, 2012

    This project would not serve local communities because local utilities wouldn't even be able to buy into the energy generated. Also, there hasn't been enough research on effects of the lines to the environmnent or farming practices. It would not make sense to move forward on this project at this time.
    Rose Marie Bucher
  • December 11, 2012

    I OPPOSE R I C L DOCKET 12-0560 THIS PROJECT WILL, AS OTHERS IN THE PAST,LEAVE YET ANOTHER SCAR ON THIS AREAS PRIME AGRICULTURAL OPERATION. AS I SEE WILL BE OF ON BENIFIT TO ANYONE IN THIS AREA.
    T.J. FITZGERALD
  • December 11, 2012

    I oppose RICL and their motion filed late Friday afternoon on December 7th.

    According to the rules proposed by RICL, the public will no long have access to information about this case as all dealing will be done behind closed doors under the classification "CONFIDENTIAL" and "Proprietary".

    RICL refuses to show the public any financial information about the company.

    RICL refuses to tell the company how much this energy from Iowa will cost us.

    RICL refuses to even say where the towers for this powerline are made as they brag about creating domestic jobs.

    Should the RICL Rules be applied as proposed by RICL on Dec 7th be applied, virtually no further information will be made public except what RICL chooses to put out in press releases.

    The residents of Illinois have a right to know who wants to build a powerline across our state.

    I do not understand this company that wants to be a public utility in Illinois refuses to be honest and open to the Illinois residents.

    Scott A Thorsen
  • December 11, 2012

    I oppose and recommend the Rock Island Clean Line LLC petition be denied.

    In business dealings, integrity is very important. Rock Island has said it intends to acquire the easements through voluntary negotiations with landowners. Yet, when I sent them a response letter in reply to their 10 October 2012 notice, as the owner of property identified by them for easement purposes, I asked Rock Island for an acknowledgment of my own letter to ensure a common understanding and agreement. Rock Island in turn has failed to respond in any manner other than to send me more literature on the merits of their position. I find their lack of acknowledgment and failure to respond a failure of management and a significant question to their integrity to negotiate in good faith.

    Duane L Olson, affected landowner

    Duane L Olson
  • December 11, 2012

    I am opposed the the Rock Island Clean Line LLC project; and recommend their peteition be denied.

    1. First, I am opposed to an additional private, for-profit entity being granted Public Utility status. Their for-profit status does not align with, nor outright guarentee, lower consumer energy costs. Furthermore, this project does not benefit the majority of Illinois consumers with lower local energy costs.

    2. The easement will impact our farming operation and disrupt our field efficiencies. This easement will impact our farm's title forever; while the economic life of the transmission line or the "proposed" windmills are for 40 years and 25 years respectively.

    3. The transimission line will impact my own business plans for an hunting/recreational business. Per the drawn route, the transmission line will cut through the heart of my timber property. Ths will greatly reduce my ability to market a hunting outfitting business and reduce the desirability of sportsment to come and enjoy the outdoors. The transmission line will affect the pristine outdoor experience and will reduce the wildlife hunting experience.

    4. JOBS: High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) construction is highly specialized with no companies in Illinois providing such service. This project will compete with our own Illinois' renewable energy development and jobs.

    5. The proposed lattice or monopole towers have a direct impact on our farming operations. The lattice structure - takes out +784sf per tower and causes a far greater space/gap to farm around. The farming impact is not only for the field space taken up by the tower - but also the space it takes to divert farm equipment around the tower. Also - there will be increased risk of damage having such a tower in the middle of the field. Since, we are not asking for the towers, I do not see how the farmer/landowner can then be held accountable for any damage to the structure. It seems an intrusion on our property rights to force a tower upon our land, then disrupt our farm efficienies, AND hold the farmer liable for any damages to the structure.

    This project should be denied in favor of current public utility companies or located with a smaller impact on the land and property rights of Illinois residents.

    Duane L Olson
  • December 11, 2012

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental, health, and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Respectfully submitted to ICC docket 12-0560,
    Roger M. Smith
    12-0560

    Roger M. Smith
  • December 6, 2012

    Please stop RICL. We farmers are having enough trouble feeding the world!
    Joe and Pat Peterson
  • December 6, 2012

    Iam requesting ICC oppose the petition by RICL and ask for you to deny their petiton docket #12-0560.As road commissoner for Troy Grove Township in LaSalle county I believe they would create grate short and long term damages to our tarred and chipped roads and our bridges,that are not built to handle these weights and extra traffic.Repairs of these roads and bridges should not be paid for by our taxpayers.
    Galen Eich
  • December 3, 2012

    RICL, a Private Texas Co. should not be given a Public Status. RICL is not about energy but in Ill. about land. RICL plans to use our private owned land so their many and vary energy sources ( natural gas, oil, coal, and a little of wind). can reach the transmission lines to the East Coast.
    There is no need for this project, not to give up some of the most fertile growing land in the world. Chicago ( an late added to RICL potential comsumer) has excess electricity. Ill exports electricity. RICL plans to compete with our nuclear and other energy producting plants. Shouldn't we be taking care of the industry in Ill. instead of a Texas wealthy company? By the way the East Coast governors have said no RICL. RICL has no market, This we are give up part of business, that is sections of Ill land.?

    Julie Auchstetter
  • November 30, 2012

    RICL should NOT be a public utility. Not only does it take away thousands of acres of prime farmland that are used to feed the world, but there are health risks that need to be addressed. More studies need to be done to find if highline electricity is safe for your health.
    Maurice Faber
  • November 28, 2012

    I am strongly opposed to granting Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) public utility status. A private company should not be granted the power to put up such a potentially disruptive infrastructure as they want to build, wherever it suits their needs. Farmland is too valuable a resource to be sacrificed when there are already other, less disruptive options available. Before RICL, or any other such company, is allowed such power, the state of Illinois should take the time to do a comprehensive study of where the best possible routes should be located that will have minimal impact on farmland or wildlife and nature preserves. Is is much wiser to preserve what nature has taken untold years to develop and bequeath to us, than carelessly toss it aside for some quick economic gain.

    And if economic gain is of such important concern, why shouldn't we be encouraging renewable energy sources within Illinois itself instead of bringing it in from out of state? Are the economic benefits that RICL claims it will bring to Illinois all that they really claim to be? I believe that there are much better ways to bring money and jobs to our state that will actually enhance our state rather then degrade the value of our farmland, which is exactly what RICL will do. I strongly urge you, do not grant this petition to RICL.

    Bruce Jones
  • November 26, 2012

    Dear ICC, I 'm writing to you to state that I oppose the proposed petition by RICL and ask for your help to deny their petition, docket # 12-0560. I beleive this project is not in our state's interest and would have very few short term jobs and little finacial benefit for our state. Please stop this private company from advancing this project at the tax payers expense. Thank you, Thomas J. Burke
    Thomas J. Burke
  • November 21, 2012

    I oppose allowing Rock Island Clean Line to obtain public utility status through the Illinois Commerce Commission. Illinois farmland should not be taken out of production by a private company for private gain. There is currently adequate public utility service for the resdents of Illinois. RICL project has no legal or ethical justification to authorize the taking of private land.
    Greg Hitchins
  • November 21, 2012

    I have some questions to ask that you may possibly be able to answer regarding Rock Island Clean Line. 1. What will the power line be used for when there is no wind? Obviously the wind is not always blowing, and with this major of a power line being proposed, surely it will not sit idle when there is now wind. 2. If this company is ever granted public utility, then are we giving electricity a higher priority than food? This line will be running plumb through some of our prime farm ground. I mean seriously, where else would it be ok to cut a 100-200 ft swath right through a factory? 3. What does this mean for private property rights if a PRIVATE company is given the right to put up this power line on landowners property? These are some serious questions that must be answered before I am going to be anywhere near supporting RICL.

    So please consider what I have said and reply to what I have said.

    Thank you.

    Isaiah Jones

    Isaiah Jones
  • November 21, 2012

    In the Regularly Scheduled Board Meeting for Serena Community Unit District No. 2 held on Thursday November 15, the Board of CUSD #2 passed Resolution 2013-D in reference to the Rock Island Clean Line and the proposed path along Route 52 which is through CUSD #2 boundaries. The Board of CUSD #2 opposes Rock Island Clean Line's Petiton for Public Convenience and Necessity/Good Standing/Service Authority Docket as filed pursuant to Docket #12-0560.
    The alledged economic benefits of the line are short lived at best and do not offset the loss of excellent farm land that will occur if the project is built along the proposed route parallel to Rt 52 in LaSalle County. Also, the process of building the line will permanently damage farm soil and make it less productive. The loss of productivity will have a negative impact on the value of the property and thus the equalized assessed valuation of the property of the District.
    There is an alternative route along Interstate 80 that is more suitable for this type of project.

    Dan Joyce
  • November 21, 2012

    I am requesting the Illlinois Commerce Commission not grant eminent domain to the Rock Island Clean Line through my farm.
    Rock Island Clean Line wants to run a transmission line through my farm. This farm has been in my famly for geerations. It is a lowland swamp farm mostly of peat soil. As a result, it has an extensive amount of drainage tile and pumping systems on the farm. I already have a railroad (formerly the Chicago Northwestern Railroad and now the Union Pacific Railroad) and a petroleum pipeline (Northern Border Pipeline) running through my family farm. Both used eminent domain. In addition, two separate corporations (Walnut Ridge Wind Farm and Green River Wind Rarm) are tying to build two wind farms around my farm.
    During my lifetime there has been three train wrecks on my farm. The last wreck was on 6 May 2011. My family was not fully compensated for the damages done by the first two train wrecks and we suffered severe financial losses. This recent third train wreck resulted in my farm being flodded by several fee of water, loss of more than 200 acres of crops and extensive damages to the tiling and drainage systems.

    The engineers from Northern Border Pipeline have recently discovered that their pipeline running through my farm is rising out of the ground and the farm ground along it is collapsing and has formed a lake the length of the pipeline. I now have lost acres of my best farm ground to this lake. And, now I face the possibility of a petroleum environmental disaster on my farm.

    Now the Rock Island Clean Line wants to use eminent domain to run transmission towers through my farm. These towers and the construction work to install them would result in substantial damage to my farm's drainage tile and pumping systems which are critical for my farm functioning. My bottom land peat farm is spider webbed with drainage tile. I have installed over $460,000. in drainage tile, drainage pumps and supporting systems on my family farm to make it productive. In addition, peat soil is combustible, and when dry will burn, if properly ignited.

    Finally, the train wrecks and pipeline construction have proven that heavy construction equipment like cranes,cement trucks, bulldozers, dump trucks, etc. cannot cross my wet peat farm ground. Temporary rock roads have to be built to get heavy construction equipment over this wet peat ground. Then, these temporary roads have to be removed and the ground restored to its original condition after construction is done. This also requires the contractor to purchae expensive peat soil as replacement soil.

    Why would a company want to build an electrical transmission line through a farm with a petroleum line that might leak at anytime and soil that will burn if properly ignited? Why would this company want to build through a wetland area that would require the construction, and later dismantelment, of extensive temporary rock roads to get the heavy construction equipment to the work site? Is not the proper place for transmission towers high solid ground? There is plenty of that 1/2 mile north of south of my bottom peat swamp farm. In addition, the farm landowner directly south of my farm has indicated that he wans to sell the Rock Island Clean Line right of way through his farm.

  • November 19, 2012

    I strongly oppose RICL. As an Illinois citizen, I am incensed that a large out-of-state venture capitalist company wants public utility status which would allow them to obtain eminent domain rights for their easements through many small farm businesses. This for a project in which local benefits are only a flash-in-the-pan, not permanent and sustaining as local utilities have been in the past.
    As a farmer, I am dismayed at the many problems with land management lattice towers cause. Further, a transmission line becomes a "utility corridor" that would establish a precedent for more lines or pipelines on/in the land.
    As a conservationist, I am outraged that RICL's 200 ft.easements will go through privately owned timber that has been protected for generations. Through Illinois, RICL is almost purely a transmission line-which by law has to carry more than "clean" energy. A transmission line is not, in and of itself, "clean."
    I believe in the future of clean energy. Let the model for that be local generation, local distribution.

    Barb Reynolds

    Barb Reynolds
  • November 19, 2012

    After reading all the comments submitted, I wonder if those who are in favor of the RICL, might be ISU students, as a couple said they were. They seem very misinformed about the true results of letting this line come through Illinois. It should be stopped for the many reasons already listed by others such as:
    1. Few, if any, permanent jobs, only tempory
    2. Energy not available to most of Illinois households
    3. Electric rates need to go up 50% for it to be feasable
    4. Destruction of 12,000 acres of prime farmland
    5. Ten governors in the East writing congress saying they DO NOT WANT THIS !
    6. The reduced ability of farmers to be able to use their equipment in those fields because of GPS not working, spray planes not possible, large equipment not being able to manuever around large towers,and reduced production to name a few.
    7. Lower taxes for area taxing bodies because of lower land values.
    8. Farmers potentially left with the towers if RICL sells out, goes bankrupt, or they come to the end of their usefulness and are left to disintegrate.
    9. Possible health problems for those in the path. We haven't seen any studies that dispute this.
    10. Illinois should and can provide it's own green energy which is the purpose of that whole Illinois green energy movement. Why run it through the state for someone else's benefit.
    11. Plenty of wind in Illinois and many towers going up to harness it--no need for a PRIVATE out of state company to force it's way through Illinois prime farmland
    12. Let them keep the wind power produced in Nebraska and Iowa right where it is. Surely they can use it in their big cities.

    I urge the ICC to REJECT the application of RICL, a privately owned Texas company, to be granted public utility status.

    Those commenting in favor of this project are woefully misinformed and uneducated about the REAL effects of RICL to our state. Go out and talk to people in the path of this project and get the REAL story.

    Land owner in Bureau county

    Diane Kleczewski
  • November 19, 2012

    I am in opposition to Rock Island Clean Line being granted public utility status. First, unlike other public utility companies, Rock Island Clean Line is not delivering an end service to the consumer. They are merely an intermediary. After the construction, the whole "jobs for Illinois" argument does not hold water either since only a nominal force is needed to "supervise" the lines. This company is from Texas, not the Midwest where the greatest impact is at either. They are looking for the bottom dollar ultimately and do not want to have to work any harder than they have to. Hence the attempt to get this status so that they will have the opportunity to claim amminent domain if negotiations do not go their way. Furthermore, the electricity actually being delivered is to a low number, if any individuals in this state. The bulk is going out of state. How does that benefit Illinois? Second, in regards to some comments that others have made on this case, the company officials have stated that electric rates have to go up in order to make this a viable project. If rates have to go up just to make this viable, how is this a good project and how is it helping to lower electric rates? Third, the unsettled nature of the wind power industry makes this a dicey project to start with. Current wind farms near where I live are unable or unwilling to make repairs to wind turbines that have sat for nearly 2 years now unused. Another wind farm still owes the manufacturer that built the wind turbines (which is from India, not the United States) for the turbines and is now considering bankruptcy. How can we be certain that the wind farms that this line is servicing will not face economic woes and be forced to fold. At that point you have powerlines doing nothing. Fourth, how is it economically viable to build a powerline several hundred miles long and skip over areas that are actually considering building non-wind power plants to meet the needs of the people in those areas. This exact scenario is in play as Mid America Energy is exploring areas to build either a nuclear or coal power plant in Iowa to meet the needs of its consumers. According to RICL though, Iowa does not need power. Individuals who take what this company is saying at face value are not looking at deeper issues that are involved beyond just losing valuable farm ground to an out of state company. This company has tried to portray opponents of the project as obstructionists while throwing out buzz words like "green energy," "jobs" and "cheaper electricity" to gain support for their projects when in reality they have never thoroughly gone into detail about what contingencies they have in place or what their real plans are.
    David Sprung
  • November 16, 2012

    I strongly feel that we need to increasing renewable energy integration into America’s Energy Portfolio, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, the economic activity this project would create including jobs and stimulating American manufacturing to the overall strengthening of US Energy Security.
    Yixiong Liu
  • November 16, 2012

    I support the Rock Island Clean Line project. The jobs and manufacturing this will stimulate is real. Americans getting jobs. Plus, helping to accelerate the wind industry with HVDC transmission lines is a brilliant idea. This is the future.
    Kristy Smith
  • November 16, 2012

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Respectfully submitted to ICC docket 12-0560,
    Roger M. Smith
    12-0560 · Roger M. Smith

    Roger M. Smith
  • November 16, 2012

    I support the Rock Island Clean Line project and believe they should be approved to construct HVDC transmission lines. Most of the land used for agriculture in Central Illinois is not used to produce food for local consumers. 90% of our food is shipped in from far distances, leaving 10% of food coming from local farmers. Central Illinois consumers buy $4.3 billion of food each year-$3.9 billion from outside our region (Source: Local Food, Farms & Jobs: Growing the Illinois Economy, March 2009). The point being, we don't eat a majority of the soybeans or corn grown in Illinois. Clean Line would bring new infrastructure that would utilize wind power. This would balance the load for areas with high populations and decrease the amount of power lost. Furthermore, the project moves us closer to meeting goals in the RPS.
    Diana
  • November 15, 2012

    I am writing to express my support for the Rock Island Clean Line project. Our country is in dire need of this initiative. In a world where we are already witnessing the effects of climate change, brought about by man-made practices and actions, it is about time we took a further step from the fossil fuel industry and began to invest our time and energy in renewable energy sources, which will be our future. There is a great amount of natural energy out there that needs to be utilized and brought to our urban centers. This project would create tons of jobs, as well as reducing our consumption of natural resources, like oil and water. Please support this project. It is our future.
    Virginia
  • November 15, 2012

    I am strongly in favor of developing economically-sustainable infrastructure that favors clean and renewable energy, particularly the Rock Island Clean Line which will help promote and stimulate economic growth in the Midwest and the United States. Please do what you can to promote this work.
    Michael T Schaefer
  • November 13, 2012

    To Whom it may concern;

    After doing much research concerning the RICL and it's intention to apply for a public untility company I have found NO merit to their application. This is a private company from Texas that wants to become a public company?They say that the people of Illinois will benefit but in my research I have not found anything that will benefit the people of Illinois and the landowners who will be near or on the proposed line.

    Also how is it that they are called Rock Island CLEAN Line when they acknowledge that it won't be All wind generated?

    They say that they are taking the energy east but 10 eastern governors have stated that they DO NOT need or want this energy.

    The damage of this line to property and farm land would be devestating and permanent. It is easy to see that this is a land-grab for the pockets of RICL. And this MUST NOT HAPPEN!! PLease do not let this happen!

    Terry Nelson
  • November 9, 2012

    This project does nothing for the residents in the state of Il. Rock Island Clean Line is a private company that is trying to call themselves a utility in order to use emanate domain for private gain. This transmission line will do nothing to lower the cost of electricity to the residents of the state. In fact the company has stated the price of electricity has to raise 50% for this project to work.
    It is time for the state and country to take a look at the way utilities are routed in order to have the least amount of impact on agriculture. Running power poles and lines through the middle of fields instead of along property lines on prime farm land should not be a priority. Mono poles should be used on lines when possible. The land owner should not have to have their operations made less efficient thus reducing the food supply so that a private company can be made more efficient. Utility lines need to follow an already interrupted corridor such as interstate highway right a ways.

    James Ufkin
  • November 7, 2012

    RICL is a destruction to good fertile agriculture land.
    From the comments it is stated CL plans to erect 2000 turbines out West. NOte not in Ill.
    If the average turbine takes 3.5 acres So 7,0000 acres will be taken out of production forever. This project is suppose to be good for Ill., yet alone the USA?.
    Keep taking acres out of production and we will be even more importing food. Food prices will increase along with expensive wind energy.

    concern farmer
  • November 7, 2012

    Rock Island Clean Line is a project that has gone great lengths to misinform and use public media to sell their unneeded project to our local economies.
    The company claims to create jobs in our area. With crews coming in from out of state for a very temporary period of time, our economy will benefit very little. A plan that would be better for Illinois, Iowa, and the Quad Cities area? How about creating the renewable energy in our state and in our local economies? That way we are left with thousands of permanent jobs. With Rock Island Clean Lines Current Proposition, jobs are created in states west of Illinois and Iowa. With local renewable energy we receive long term jobs, increased tax revenue, and the profits and benefits are received by local entities. With this plan the money will go to wealthy individuals in Texas and New York.
    What is most alarming is our total disregard for our nations #1 industry, agriculture. Every year agriculture and local farmers contribute billions of dollars in the quad cities area. In the next 50 years American Farmers are faced with the challenge of producing more food than we have in the last 10,000 years combined!
    By setting a precedent where private companies with private interests can come in and use eminent domain to take farmland out of production and hurt those businesses that feed us, provide fuel for our vehicles, and protect our environment, we are asking for trouble.

    Bill Landers
  • November 7, 2012

    I support the Rock Island Clean Line project. The private sector has identified a major limitation to utilizing an abundant energy resource, and is stepping in to solve the problem. This will provide a significant benefit to many Americans, without using taxpayer money. While some landowners will suffer inconvenience, very little agricultural land will be taken out of production, and none permanently. Hazards to the public or environment are very small, especially compared to a pipeline or highway. On the whole, I think the benefits far outweigh the costs.
    anonymous
  • November 7, 2012

    I believe that RICL’s transmission line plan is a bad idea. It will take up too much valuable farmland in the area. We will lose food production in a time we need to increase food production because of an increasing population. It is also unfair to farmers because the price of their land that they paid a lot for will decrease.

    I am a farmer who's land you are proposing to go through, this will damage my land for many many years to come. If we want to add irrigation at a later time to help improve our land and growing more crops to feed the world, with your transmission lines and poles going through our farm we can not add irrigation or anything else to our farmland to help improve it. This will only hurt us as farmers!!!

    I believe this line will only do harm for us and it won’t do anything good for us.

    James Phillips
  • November 7, 2012

    I believe that RICL’s transmission line plan is a bad idea. It will take up too much valuable farmland in the area. We will lose food production in a time we need to increase food production because of an increasing population. It is also unfair to farmers because the price of their land that they paid a lot for will decrease.

    I am a farmer who's land you are proposing to go through, this will damage my land for many many years to come. If we want to add irrigation at a later time to help improve our land and growing more crops to feed the world, with your transmission lines and poles going through our farm we can not add irrigation or anything else to our farmland to help improve it. This will only hurt us as farmers!!!

    I believe this line will only do harm for us and it won’t do anything good for us.

    Joe Phillips
  • November 7, 2012

    I believe that RICL’s transmission line plan is a bad idea. It will take up too much valuable farmland in the area. We will lose food production in a time we need to increase food production because of an increasing population. It is also unfair to farmers because the price of their land that they paid a lot for will decrease.

    I am a farmer who's land you are proposing to go through, this will damage my land for many many years to come. If we want to add irrigation at a later time to help improve our land and growing more crops to feed the world, with your transmission lines and poles going through our farm we can not add irrigation or anything else to our farmland to help improve it. This will only hurt us as farmers!!!

    I believe this line will only do harm for us and it won’t do anything good for us.

    Kristie Phillips
  • November 5, 2012

    I ask that you approve the Rock Island Clean Line project. America has been struggling to advance the renewable energy industry due to the lack of a sufficient transmission infrastructure. This project is aimed at connecting America's BEST wind resources with load centers out east where many utilities are burning fossil fuels. If the US is every going to start weening itself off of dirty sources of power, a new transmission system MUST be built.

    Clean Line Energy Partners has gathered a team of the most knowledgeable and passionate leaders in the renewable energy industry. I know that this project will not make everyone happy, but the opportunity to open up the development for around 2,000 wind turbines is detrimental to the overall health of everyone on earth. The sooner that we can mitigate burning coal and releasing untold chemicals into the earth's atmosphere, the better. Clean Line is working towards a sustainable energy future for this country and they should be praised.

    I fully support the Rock Island Clean Line project and ask that you approve this project. The future of clean air depends on it.

    William Winkeljohn
  • November 5, 2012

    Hello my name is Haylee; I’m from the Serena FFA Chapter. I would like to express me feeling about the Rock Island Clean Line (RICL). I am agents the route that you are planning to put these power lines. I feel it will do nothing but cause our farmers trouble. These lines will not benefit us so why take our farmers income? I feel then not only will it affect our farmers but your not 100% sure it wont affect people with certain health problems. I just feel that this is your plan and you should rethink about running it down 52. It’s going to do nothing but take money away from our hard working farmers, and this plan doesn’t benefit us in any way.
    Thanks.

    Haylee
  • November 5, 2012

    I am greatly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwanted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. Agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois. The farmers and ranchers of Illinois contribute billions of dollars a year to the state and local economies, with the amount of land that will be used if you allow the planned route, the farmers will be losing more money every year because of these towers being built on there land. By losing the estimated 12,000 miles of land that it will take to build this project, farmers risk the field tiles that drain access water off the field will be crushed and compressed by the six concrete trucks for every tower meaning a lot of field tiles will be ruined.
    The fact that this is a “clean line” is also false. What are they going to do when production gets low? They will turn to coal, nuclear plants, and natural gases to feed the transmission line using resources that anybody could use in the case of an emergency. All of those sources of energy compete with our public utilities that are already in place in Illinois, by creating a way for out of state energy to enter and exit the state. Because this transmission line will not benefit our state, I believe this project is completely unnecessary
    Please do not allow the Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. This project is inconvenient and will affect the farmers and production rate of Illinois. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Katelin Keisler
  • November 5, 2012

    The future of energy independence is renewable energy.I get excited when I hear of investments in renewable energy like what Cleanline is bringing on board. Let us make the future safe today by supporting renewable energy.
    Isaac Duah
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    Agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois. Our farmers contribute a great amount the the economy. If the Rock Island Clean Line is passed our state is going to lose approximately 12000 acres of farmland. The land value will also go down due to compacted soil from construction. Due to the compaction of the soil it will be more difficult for the plants roots to get through the dirt decreasing the amount of bushels per acre.
    The best renewable energy plan for our state is to produce the energy within our state lines. As energy travels it loses a great deal of its power. So as the energy moves across the nation by the time it gets to its final destination it will have lost nearly half of its original power. Proving that this project is an unnecessary waste of time and money.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project is also not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that the Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    Profit from this project will be used for only the benefit of individuals, not electric customers and the residents of Illinois. Many of the same people who wrote the biased policies that regulate this industry are now trying to profit from the regulations that were drafted by them.
    Rock Island continues to use legal tactics, trickery, and deceit to help its cause. It is a dishonest group of individuals, who haven't done anything to ensure the safety, economic security, and the values of the stakeholders that are affected.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Lain is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity”. This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I believe that RICL’s transmission line plan is a bad idea. It will take up too much valuable farmland in the area. We will lose food production in a time we need to increase food production because of an increasing population. It is also unfair to farmers because the price of their land that they paid a lot for will decrease. RICL has also not proven that their power line is not a health hazard. This means we are taking a risk in whether or not this power line will effect the health of people who live or work next to the power line. I believe this line will only do harm for us and it won’t do anything good for us.
    Andrew Tordai III
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.

    Rock Island Clean Line has not been able to tell us the long term health concerns for residents living by the lines or for the people that will travel near them. With all possible routes, many people will be affected because the lines are supposed to travel through communities, and other highly populated or traveled areas. The Rock Island Clean Line has not been able to tell us all of the dangers that people may face.

    Many landowners and local stakeholders have asked many questions about their own concerns, however the Rock Island Clean Line has not been able to answer their questions. The RICL has been able to speak with the leadership of landowner groups but has still not been able to reply. The landowners and stakeholders are still unaware of the full impact of the lines and the liability they may face.

    Griffin Tuftie
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    1. The Rock Island Clean Line has no proof that the high tension lines don’t have evidence that the high tension lines will not cause health problems for residents in the area. These lines will be put near railroads, airports and in spots that companies may want to build stores. Putting the high tension lines there will cause airports to have to change their take off and landing routes.
    2. The RICL have done very little to answer questions about concerns that landowners and local stakeholders have. The landowners are concerned that they will lose some of their farm land and they don't want to lose the land that they have bought and created. The lines going through their fields will decrease the ability for airplanes to spray farmers fields. It will also be harder for combines picking crops and tractors to get around.

    Please do not allow the RICL public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” this project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economic largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claim’s to benefit.

    Cal Kempiak
  • November 5, 2012

    I an firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for the public utility status though docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. Taxes will be affected by the project. This project is putting a 20%-30% decrease in land values. This affects Property taxes that support our schools, local governments, and our state. These property taxes will suffer greatly. This project will also need coal, nuclear, and natural gas plants to feed the transmission line. We are in low production of these products and can't afford to waste them on the transmission line. It is not a “clean line” as it claims to be. It will compete with public utilities that are already in place in Illinois, by creating a direct highway for an out of state energy to enter. Our energy produced in Illinois will not be able to join this line. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certified of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please dent them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    With this program Illinois is not even benefiting from the energy being created. It will not even supply power to Illinois itself. This is a pointless investment for Illinois to make since they do not benefit from it. By the time it makes it to the designated areas for the power half of it will already be lost in the transfer. So it does not benefit us or the other states and cities. It would also bring up health issues and crowding. The line is said to go through towns businesses and local airports. It would be an issue for the airports because they can't fly out of there with a huge tower conducting electricity in the way. It would shut down that business and force the people working there out of a job. If it were to go through a town and a natural disaster such as a tornado ran though it and ripped it from the foundation it could land on multiple houses and lead to death. This project is not a good thing for the state of Illinois.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Trevor
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0506. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. The project is unneeded and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.
    It will take 12,000 acres of farmland that contributes to billions of dollars for local and state economy. The farmland will become compact from this and it will not be able to grow crops as efficiently ruining one of the most valuable resources in Illinois. Also it will affect taxes in Illinois because there will be a 20% to 30% decrease in land values. Property taxes that could support our schools, local government and state government.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that the Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwanted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    The fact that our land values will decrease 20 to 30 percent that is pretty much stealing money that landowners have worked hard for. Not only will we lose our land and the value of it the taxes will be raised and people that don't even own land will have to pay higher taxes so it can affect a lot more than just the average farmer. Agricultural is the largest industry in Illinois so taking land from the farmers is taking their jobs so some small farmers may have to stop farming therefore raising the job loss.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This projected is surely not “convenient” for the agricultural producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizen of Illinois and the citizen that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    William Hatland
  • November 5, 2012

    I am strongly against the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwanted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. Agriculture is a huge part in Illinois with hundreds of acres of farmland. Having those RICL towers put on the land will take up that farmland. Which leads to their production decreasing and prices go up for our consumers. More construction will be needed to make roads that lead to the towers causing more land to be taken up. This project will greatly effect taxes. Plus RICL is only promising to provide temporary jobs to put up this project which leads to more people out of work when it's finished. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    mallory vance
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility through docket 12-0560. Please deny the right for eminent domain and public utility status for Rock Island Clean Line . This project is unwanted by the state of Illinois .
    Rock Island Clean has done a poor job explaining the details of this project. Many residents in the state of Illinois are unaware of this project. I feel that Rock Island Clean Line had tricked the residents of Illinois and have attempted to pass this docket before residents had a chance to research the company and their designated route. RICL has sent letters to residents who will be near this “Clean Line” and had thanked them for their cooperation. I am unhappy with the designated route. This project will not only destroy our farmland but also cause a ton of health issues. As a resident of Illinois it is my job to inform you that during low production nuclear and nuclear gas plants will feed the transition line . This nuclear energy makes the line not “clean”. This company has a false name which confuses the residents of Illinois into giving Rock island Clean Line eminent domain. Rock Island Clean Line had also already hired people to put up these towers before Illinois had even passed it. Electricity power will also increase and Illinois does not need to tolerate the increase in electrical prices. These power lines are running on DC current which will affect us all causing health problems.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean line is wishing to be granted a “ Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agricultural producers that make up the economies largest industry. This project is also not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Thank-you for your Time

    Anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly apposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.
    Agriculture is one of the main industries in Illinois so if farmland is taken for this project Illinois will be suffering. The land that will be taken for this project will be ruined and people won't be able to farm on it anymore. It is estimated that the Rock Island Clean Line will take 12,000 acres of farmland out of production for the profit of a few wealthy individuals.
    Also the claim that this is a “clean line” are false. During times when energy is low they will be using coal, nuclear, and natural gas plants will be used to feed the transmission. This will compete with our public utilities already in place for Illinois by creating a direct highway for out of state energy to enter. Also energy prices will increase and if a tower is built of your lot the property price decreases.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    anonymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status throughdocket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is uneeded and unwarrented for te State of Illinois.

    In the last monthI have hear some good things but mostly bad things. I understand that the route along 52 is the cheapest and easiest way and the least effective on people in major towns, but putting it on farm land will ruin the farmers tiles and tear up their feilds. In my opinion I feel like RICL is a complete waste of time and money. This project is supposed to be creating clean energy, but from my understanding from readings , the back up energy is made from coal and the rest from wind mills. Also to make this extremely long powerline will use a lot of non clean energy. It seems that it will cost a lot more to get RICL going than what will be gotten out of it.

    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a "Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity." This project also is not a necesity for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Charla Cools
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status trough docket 12-0560 because it isn’t doing any good for us. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. Agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois. Farmers and ranchers contribute billions of dollars to the local economies and the states economy. So it’s taking land and money away from farmers. All the farmers that have land that this line will be going through are losing money. The less land they have the less money their going to make. If rumors are true, people traveling down route 52 aren’t going to have any use of new technology. Please do not allow RICL public utility status. RICL is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity”. This project is surly not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industries. This is a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Thanks,
    Heather Witzel

    Heather Witzel
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. This project will take out 12,000 acres of perfectly fine farmland. Illinois alone contributes billions of dollars to the local and state economy. Why take out good farmland when Illinois’ largest industry is agriculture? Farmers need their land, especially little farms that don’t have a whole lot of land in the first place. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utilities status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity”. This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Brooke Buckley
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the rock island clean line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.

    Agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois. Farmers are faced with producing as much food in the next 50 years as they have since the state of Illinois came into existence without this non – renewable resource. Farmers are put at a huge disadvantage. It is estimated that this project will take 12,000 acres of farmland out of production for the profit of a few wealthy individuals.

    Local taxing entities will also be affected by the project. With a 20% - 30% decrease in land values, the property taxes that support our schools, local governments and our state government will suffer greatly. Since they intend to be a public utility, they will be left to reap the profits and deny tax revenue

    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island clean line is wishing to be granted a certificate of public convenience and necessity this project is surely not convenient for the agriculture produces that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a necessity for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Wyatt Seaborn
  • November 5, 2012

    I oppose the Rock Island Clean Line’s project for several different reasons, there seems to be more negative points then there are positive points to this project. Rock Island Clean Line seems to have very little concern for local land owners that are going to be great effect of this project, like the farmers. Although many land owners that are unaware of Rock Island Clean Line’s project and they don’t know the effect it will have on them. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. This project also is not a ‘necessity’ for citizens of Illinois and the citizens Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Kendall Kueteman
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Lines request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them any right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.
    Agriculture is Illinois’ largest industry. Illinois farmers and ranchers contribute billions of dollars to local and state economies. It has been estimated that 12,000 acres of farm ground will be taken out of production for the profit of a few wealthy individuals. I think these wealthy individuals need to remember why they have food on there tables and clothes on there backs.
    I believe that the route of the line should be built along the I-80 corridor instead of taking the more direct cheaper route. If they take the direct route they are cutting through the path of many agricultural industries. The country should not be made an industrial park for the east coast.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “certificate of public convenience and necessity” this project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Bryan Temple
  • November 5, 2012

    Hi my name is Seth Wiley and I am resident and area farmer near the proposed route in Illinois. I strongly OPPOSE the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons. Illinois farmland, a non-renewable resource, should not be taken out of production for private gain. AGRICULTURE is the LARGEST INDUSTRY in Illinois. Farmers and ranchers in Illinois contribute billions of dollars to the local economies and state economy. The Line does not benefit Illinois residents and there is currently enough public utility for Illinois residents. Rock Island continues to use legal tactics, trickery, and deceit to help its cause. It is a dishonest group of individuals, who have done nothing to ensure the safety, economic security, and values of the stakeholders that are affected.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Seth Wiley
  • November 5, 2012

    I am not opposed to the objectives of Rock Island Clean Line. However, I am very opposed to the route that this project could go on. They shouldn’t take the easy route and go right through farmers’ land. Rock Island Clean Line should be forced to do this project along Interstate 80 instead. Just because the direct route is cheaper, doesn’t mean they should take the easy way out and go right through peoples’ land. Rock Island Clean Line needs to go the extra mile and spend more money to take the longer route and go along Interstate 80. It is important for the State of Illinois to conduct an in depth study of RICL’s comprehensive plan, similar to what is being done in the State of Iowa. With several more plans in the works, this company should be evaluated, and the impact on our state should be seen. It is their intent to blanket our state with burdensome transmission lines for their own profit.
    Brendan Murphy
  • November 5, 2012

    I am opposed to Rock Island Clean Line’s objectives. The main ting that makes me not line RICL is that the one route that is taking is HWY 52. HWY 52 run’s right next to my house and I don’t want to look out my window every morning and see a huge tower outside my window. RICL has been using sneaky tactics so they can get what they want. These people are dishonest and have done nothing to ensure the safety of the people. Please do not allow RICL public utility status. RICL is wishing to be granted a “certificate of public convince and necessity”. This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economics largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that RICL claims to benefit.
    Dalton Gunier
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    Farm land in a non-renewable recourse that should not be tampered with. In Illinois, agriculture is the largest industry. This project will put farmers at a disadvantage. It is estimated that it will take 12,000 acres of farmland out of production. RICL is being inconsiderate by taking the cheaper route instead of the smarter route.
    Also Rock Island Clean Line has done very little to answer the concerns of landowners and local stakeholders. Many land owners don’t understand or are unaware of the impact the lines will have and liability that they face as a result of the project.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Cal Mason
  • November 5, 2012

    Hi my name is Matthew Kamin, a local resident directly in line of the planned route for the line. I am against RICL. The planned route they have chosen runs directly through many farms around the Route 52 area, which happen to be containing some of the best farmland in America. The biggest way they will destroy the land they want to use won’t actually be caused by the towers, but will be caused by the construction process. They will completely compact the dirt with concrete trucks and heavy equipment. The organization Rock Island Clean Line is simply a new company looking to make millions off of government money. The company should not be granted Eminent Domain, because it is a PRIVATE company. They will be destroying the greatest nonrenewable resource, Illinois farmland.
    Matthew Kamin
  • November 5, 2012

    I approve the RICL. I have been noticing some comments about destroyed farm land. Although I understand that may be of concern, I do believe that it is not true. The design of the line does not destroy farm land. The tower is put in and it can be successfully farmed around. It may be true that while the tower is being constructed the location around the tower may not be able to be farmed, but that is why land owners sign contracts that provide a monetary compensation during construction. I believe that when completely analyzed the RICL is approval worthy.
    Lucas Kappel
  • November 5, 2012

    Deny / stop Rock Island Clean Line
    The project will steal non renewable resource of farmland.
    It will impede farming of adjacent land.
    It will impose restrictions on its neighbors.
    It does not serve the public of Illinois.
    It will increase Illinois utility rates. Who needs that?
    They are not 100% green energy as they claim,
    The east coast wants to develope their own green energy, not buy it from Nebraska and Iowa.
    Illinois is simply being used and runover by this company.
    There is nothing good in the plan for Illinois farmers and residents.

    DECLINE!

    Karen Stremlau

    Karen Stremlau
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status thorough docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.

    1. Rock Island Clean Line really isn’t a ‘clean line.’ They actually use coal, nuclear, and natural gas plants for the transmission line. This will battle against our public utilities that are already in Illinois by making power for out of state energy to enter our state. Our energy made in Illinois will not be able to join this line.
    2. The profit from Rock Island Clean Line benefits people from other states not Illinois.

    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Karri Stanley
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is needed and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.
    AGRICULTURE is the LARGEST INDUSTRY in Illinois. Farmers and ranchers in Illinois contribute billions of dollars to local economies and the state economy. Farmers are faced with producing as much food in the next 50 years as they have since the State of Illinois came into existence. This Rock Island Clean Line will definitely cut through our farmland and destroy the farmers career because its taking out a lot of their farmland.
    RICL had really not done a very good job answering the many questions the farmers and local townspeople have. They have ignored most of them besides the ones they can answer. A lot of local people have no idea what the power lines will do or give off near their homes. They have been asked to speak with leadership of landowners group but have refused.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not “convenient' for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Daniel Enger
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    The biggest industry in Illinois is agriculture. With this project it will take up much needed crop land. The farmers and ranchers contribute over a billion dollars to the economy. This project will take up around 12,000 acres of farmland. That will put the farmers and ranchers at a huge disadvantage. Rock Island Clean Line has not answered how this will affect long term health concerns for anyone living near these lines. These lines are set to pass through communities, near airports, through small businesses and will ultimately cause hardships to all those near the lines.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    anoymous
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the rock island clean line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the state of Illinois for the following reasons.

    Profit from the project will be used for the benefit of individuals, not for the farmers or the rest of Illinois that will have to deal with the clean line. Many of the same people that wrote the biased policies that regulate this industry are now trying to profit from the regulations that they drafted.

    Agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois and RICL wants to take the land we use in our state, one of the lowest economically and benefit the states that have the money. This will cause most of the people in Illinois to lose money while only a few individuals will make money. Right now in this economic status, we don’t need this.

    Please do not allow rock island clean line public utility status. This project is surely not “convenient” for agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project is also not necessary for the citizens that rock island clean line seems to benefit.

    Thomas Lee, Maverick
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.
    The profit from the project will be used for the benefit of individuals, not electric customers and the residents of Illinois. Many of the same people who wrote the biased policies that regulate this industry are now trying to profit from the regulations that they drafted.
    Rock Island Clean Line has yet to come up with evidence that these transmission lines will not cause long term health concerns for residents living near these lines. It also greatly cripples local infrastructure. These lines are set to pass through communities, near airports, through small business, and ultimately cause hardships to all those near the lines.
    Please do not allow the Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Lea Grootenboer
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed to the Rock Island Clean Line’s projected request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons: Due to the fact of the fertile land in Illinois, agriculture is the largest industry in Illinois. The building of these 28 by 28 foot towers and the taking of 200 feet of easement will take an estimated 12,000 acres out of production. The acreage lost cannot be reclaimed. The compaction of the soil will never allow crops to grow the same there ever again. In the next 50 years, the worlds population is to grow by 2 billion people. Taking even the slightest amount of land out of plentiful production can affect the amount of people who will suffer from hunger. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Sincerely,
    Alec Scheib

    Alec Scheib
  • November 5, 2012

    I am writing my personal opinion to put a negative input into the proposed Rock Island Clean Line project through docket 12-0560. The reasoning behind my opinion is the simple fact that all these power lines seem to do is bring in negative effects to our community. In the end it’s really not going to benefit myself, family, community, or state by using eminent domain. Our farmland that we as American producers use to help feed our nation is going to be taken away from us, and we have little say as to whether they do or not. If we lose our land that our crops are produced the less food you will find in order to feed your families.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “ Certificate of public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “Convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Lacey Safranske
  • November 5, 2012

    I’m writing to request that Illinois Commerce Commission reject the Rock Island Clean Line Project certificate of the public Convenience (Docket # 12-0560) that was filed Wednesday October 10, 2012. I’m not against this idea but I am against the route. Why take our farm land? Why not use state land? Yes, I do understand that it will cost more but in the long run private property won’t be used. Why not put the transmission lines along I-80? What will happen to all the newer cars that run off of computers? Will they shut down when you are driving by them? Also what about our farm equipment? We as farmers need every little bit of land we have to keep our nation growing! In my opinion I don’t think RICL should be able to claim eminent domain on our land! They are not a public utility.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line Public Utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convince and Necessity” This project is surely not “Convenient” for the agricultural producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project is also not “Necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Blair Armstrong
  • November 5, 2012

    My name is Paige Walters and I am writing to express my opinion in the Rock Island Clean Line project. I’m opposed to the project because it seems like there is more to lose than to gain. It’s stated that RICL can’t be placed on a major highway because there are too many surrounding towns. But the route they have chosen to run in Illinois also has many towns. RICL will destroy many farms in these towns, which can be a way of income for a person or family. Prices of food are already high; imagine the prices after the fields decrease. More farm land is being lost so less food will be produced, which will raise the prices of food. I don’t see this project as a step towards better technology and cleaner energy as some others do. I see this project as another way for a private company to make money that our country, let alone our state, doesn’t have.
    Paige Walters
  • November 5, 2012

    I am opposed to this route that R.I.C.L. has planned out. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois. I believe that the line should be sent down route 80 rather than on our perfectly good farmland. Rock Island Clean Line does not benefit my community; therefore taking farmers land away for this is unfair. It is also unfair to farmers because the price of land will decrease. They should build more windmills to the east closer to New York to prevent the lack of energy. Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Thanks,

    Caleen Smith

    Caleen Smith
  • November 5, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. I don't think it should be going through the best farm land there is in Illinois. I understand the route may be cheaper for RICL, but it won't be cheaper for us. Also, I don't understand why we are going to be sending this renewable energy across the US when the area receiving the energy doesn't even really care to be receiving it. There is a lot of variables that have still not been explained about this project. Rerouting is something RICL should greatly consider at this time. Route 52 is not the way to go.
    Ashley Krug
  • November 5, 2012

    I am against the Rock Island Clean Line for numerous reasons. One of them being that the physical line would interrupt the precious farmland that makes our state so influential. Another would be that it is unclear if the states, such as New York, even want to receive the wind power being offered. I also don’t understand why the RICL can’t run along Interstate 80, where it would disturb less people. It shows that the RICL is being lazy and doing what is faster for them, no matter if the citizens affected don’t agree with it. I think the RICL should consider all that is involved, instead of protecting the money in their pocket and avoiding getting involved with the federal government for this project. They are not being thorough and we, the inhabitants of Illinois, are getting the possible backlash.
    Tara Berggren
  • November 5, 2012

    I am taking the time to write this to show my support for the Rock Island Clean Line project. This is a very important project, because of its ground breaking efforts. As a senior in the Renewable Energy program at Illinois State University I have learned from many sources about the great abundance of potential wind power in the Central United States that has yet to be tapped into, because of the lack of current infrastructure. I was very excited when I first heard of the Rock Island Clean Line project along with Clean Line's other projects, because it was the first time I had heard about a company taking the initiative to construct the infrastructure necessary to tap into the great wind power potential in the Central United States. As the world's population continues to grow, so does our demand for energy and it is growing at a very fast rate. Of course, when there is a demand for energy, there is a demand in the source of the energy as well, and unfortunately our society still favors the use of fossil fuels. Renewable forms of energy are extremely important in making the slow transfer from the heavily polluting norm of burning fossil fuels for energy to a more sustainable way of meeting our energy demand. This being the case, I believe it is very important to utilize every possible chance we have to increase the amount of energy we receive from renewable forms of energy and the Rock Island project along with Clean Line's other projects is such a great opportunity for just that. In fact, Clean Line's HVDC infrastructure would help "plump up" our Renewable Energy Portfolio which requires increased energy produced from renewables. Another benefit, and an obvious one, is the creation of jobs from this project. In the current state of the economy any increase in jobs, even if it is only one single job, is a positive thing. Clean Line's project would require many new jobs both temporary and permanent. I fully support Clean Line's project, because I believe that it will be very successful and will most likely create an increase in similar ideas and projects around the country as people become more aware of the topic at hand.
    -Sean Lanners

    Sean Lanners
  • November 5, 2012

    Clean Energy is the future. I am sick and tired of the myopic view of politicians and executives that are only interested in the next few years. Alternative energy needs investment from our country so that we can stay at the forefront (sadly it may be too late) of technology we help invent. Regardless of whether wind, solar, photovoltaic, geo-thermal, etc are the answers, the first step is to build a grid that can handle this energy and get it to people that need it. This is a project that Illinois needs. It will add jobs and move us in the right direction for a change.

    Sincerely,
    Matt Wuchter

    Matthew Wuchter
  • November 5, 2012

    We do not support, Rock Island Clean Line and ask the ICC to decline any utility status to them. Their project does not benefit Illinois in any way. Our farm land is more important than building an electric line that no one wants. They are not out to serve the public good they are only in it to line their own pockets with government money.

    Please decline any status Rock Island Clean Line requests.

    Karen Stremlau
  • October 30, 2012

    This project is a great way to act on Renewable Energy and bring electricity to Illinois and the Midwest. After speaking with Rob and learning about this project at the CI Green Expo, I really hope that this project gets all the necessary approvals from ICC to continue the project.
    Mehdi Zadeh
  • October 30, 2012

    I oppose Rock Island Clean Line and their request under docket 12-0560.

    RICL claims energy prices are going to climb in the near future to levels to make this project profitable. Energy will cost around $70/MWh without the Production Tax Credit to make this profitable. RICL has hired some very smart economists to tell us energy costs are going to climb very quickly.

    Yet, Midwest Generation is closing coal plants. They are not closing these plants because of protest by community activists in Chicago. These plants are being closed because the current price of electricity is so low it is not economical to keep them open. Midwest Generation does not foresee a turnaround in these low energy prices.

    I have no doubt, if Midwest Generation's market forecasters could see better times ahead with higher demand and hirer prices, they would invest in these plants. Surely at $70/MWh Midwest Generation would be improving the emissions from these old coal plants. But Midwest Generation does not see demand picking up. Midwest Generation sees these low energy prices staying here for a while.

    Therefore this public utility holding company that owns Midwest Generation is closing some old coal plants in Illinois.

    I question RICL's honesty about their energy price forecasts. I question RICL's honesty when they say they will be competing on an "open market". I suspect RICL is looking to take advantage of Renewable Portfolio Standards and attempt to force consumers to pay higher prices for this electricity.

    I believe RICL sees Illinois more as a hostage market for their "clean" energy than an open market. RICL is an example of the evils of private socialism and not a shine star of free market capitalism.

    RICL has shown time and time again a lack of honesty to Illinois stakeholders in their privately invested project, and this is another example.

    Scott Thorsen
  • October 30, 2012

    The points not to grant RICL a Public Utilitiy Status is almost too numberous to type.
    First it is not an Ill co. It is a Texas Co with an Enron setup. That is its main goal is not to serve the people of Ill. or even the nation but to serve it self.
    RICL is using Ill as a "pass thur " state. In the first open house they said the electricity would go to the East coast, nothning about Chicago. Now they are adding Chicago. A course none of this is writting.
    What is their real purpose? ThisCo has our Governor under their spell. They are selling a product that has no benefit for Ill. We have are own wind turbines and 6 nuclear plants, we have a solar farm ( which is a even bigger waste of taxpayers money than RICL), The Icc and our Governor need to take a close look at RICL. Beware of salesmen selling snake oil. Use some Midwest common sense.
    Mary Auchstetter
    .

    Mary Auchstetter
  • October 30, 2012

    I am against the Rock Island Clean Line. It is to be built by a private company to transmit electricity produced by a government subsidized wind power industry. It will devalue farmland, reduce production and bring no economic benefit to the communities it crosses. Large endeavors in the past, such as the railroads and interstate highways, were an economic boom to the areas they traveled. This will do the exact opposite by curtailing any future development of the land taken but also any surrounding properites.
    Fred Davis
  • October 30, 2012

    HVDC lines are exactly what the renewable energy community needs to get mass amounts of power from renewable sources in remote areas to load centers that usually are far away. I am in full support of the Rock Island Clean Line to tap into the rich wind energy source of northwest Iowa and delivering it eastward. The Rock Island Clean Line has found a way to cut transmission loss and use less of a footprint with HVDC lines which is a win win in terms of transmitting power. I hope to see more future projects incorporating HVDC lines since this is was renewable energy needs and also what America needs!
    Ross Schmillen
  • October 30, 2012

    As a resident of the state, a land owner and tax payer I find it difficult to understand why the ICC would even consider giving an out-of-state venture capital company public utility status. This company wants to build a line from an out of state POTENTIAL wind generating facility to POTENTIAL markets to the east. 10 Governers from the east coast have written to the Congress and Senate stating very clearly that they did not want midwest wind power; they would rather develop their own and create jobs at home.
    The jobs and associated revenue RICL claims they will generate are for the most part a one time flash in the pan and will have no long term effect on the economy. Why not develop the wind power on Lake Michigan and create energy close to the need and keep the jobs in Illinois?
    RICL proposes to build a line that no one except those on the NorthWest end can put any power onto and no one except those on the Eastern end can get any power off of, at least with real public utility transmission lines those people all along the right of way can put local power on and/or acess transmission power for their use. RICL wants to build a transmission line for their own personal use and all those who are inconvenienced along the way are merely pawns in the chess game of venture capitalism. Public utility status is a foot in the door on the way to eminent domain when there are already coridors open they can use without harrassing the public in any way such as existing utility, RR, and highway R.O.W.s
    -Wm Chris Reynolds

    Wm. Chris Reynolds
  • October 30, 2012

    I AM IN FAVOR OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR JOBS AND GREEN ENERGY
    NICOLE KELLY
  • October 30, 2012

    After reading all the comments submitted, I wonder if those at the end, which are all in favor of the RICL, might be ISU students, as a couple said they were. They seem very misinformed about the true results of letting this line come through Illinois. It should be stopped for the many reasons already listed by others such as:
    1. Few, if any, permanent jobs, only tempory
    2. Energy not available to most of Illinois households
    3. Electric rates need to go up 50% for it to be feasable
    4. Destruction of 12,000 acres of prime farmland
    5. Ten governors in the East writing congress saying they DO NOT WANT THIS !
    6. The reduced ability of farmers to be able to use their equipment in those fields because of GPS not working, spray planes not possible, large equipment not being able to manuever around large towers,and reduced production to name a few.
    7. Lower taxes for area taxing bodies because of lower land values.
    8. Farmers potentially left with the towers if RICL sells out, goes bankrupt, or they come to the end of their usefulness and are left to disintegrate.
    9. Possible health problems for those in the path. We haven't seen any studies that dispute this.
    10. Illinois should and can provide its' own green energy which is the purpose of that whole Ill. green energy movement-not run it through the state for someone else's benefit.
    11. Plenty of wind in Illinois and many towers going up to harness it--no need for a PRIVATE out of state company to force its' way through Illinois prime farmland
    12. Let them keep the wind power produced in Nebraska and Iowa right where it is. Surely they can use it in Des Moines, Ames, Waterloo, Omaha etc.

    I urge the ICC to reject the application of RICL for public utility status.

    Those commenting in favor of this project are woefully misinformed and uneducated about the REAL effects of RICL to our state. Go out and talk to people in the path of this project and get the REAL story.

    Madra Fischer
  • October 30, 2012

    I REALLY SUPPORT THIS PROJECT BECAUSE IT WILL BE A BENEFIT TO US. THIS WILL GENERATE UNINTERRUPTED CLEAN ENERGY AT VERY AFFORDABLE RATES TO CONSUMERS.
    AMA FERKAH
  • October 30, 2012

    I am urging you to oppose giving RICL public utility status and eminent domain. It is a private company trying to destroy 12,000 acres of prime Illinois farm land for private profit. This sets a dangerous presedent for future applications of the same kind. We are expected to feed more people per acre around the world every year and we cannot do it with fewer and fewer acres.
    This project will not benefit Illinois except for some cement and road construction jobs. The construction of high voltage lines is a specialized job and most would not qualify to perform it.
    Illinois has many wind towers and more to come to produce our own power and would only get a small amount in Chicago from this project. Off shore wind power is gaining popularity. Just about any place can produce its own wind power and does not need a company coming through our prime farmland from Nebraska and Iowa to send it to the East coast where the goverorners of 10 states don't want it !!!
    The RICL has been misleading in their public statements and disingenuous in their dealings with the landowners. They said they had not files for public utility status when, in fact, they had. They are already trying to get landowners to sign contracts before they know what is going on.
    My field will be cut in half by this line which already has a railroad cutting diagonally through it and two pipelines under it. My tenants will not be able to get their machinery through this field. This is prime farmland which is NOT replacable. We are expected to feed more people per acre, but we can't do it with fewer and fewer acres. This can't continue and expect us to meet the needs of our country and the world.
    The VP of RICL said that our electric wholesale prices would have to go up 50% to become economically feasable for them. How does this benefit Illinois citzens in any way?
    I would ask you to evaluate all competing transmission lines proposed in Illinois as Iowa is doing.
    I urge you to NOT give public status to this Texas company which is trying to ruin Illinois farmland.
    Madra Fischer

    Madra Fischer
  • October 30, 2012

    Rock Island Clean Line LLC FTW
    Tim Fudala
  • October 30, 2012

    Projects like the Rock Island Clean line are essential to the growth of a nation. Without this project the unique resource will be wasted. The upfront task of getting a team and funding together to pursue this goal has already been completed. Now it is up to the community to support this effort, which is why I am writing to you. I truly believe this is the way an energy independent nation that politicians are declaring for will work. The demand for clean energy in large cities is ever increasing. The opportunity is present to take towards a more prosperous future for the environment and the nation. Please consider this letter towards approving the project.

    Thank you.

    Tim Vacura
  • October 26, 2012

    Please deny RICL public utility status and the persmission to construct this transmission line. The project lacks merit and necessity! It simply doesn't make sense for Illinois and Iowa taxpayers. In addition, it is becoming increasingly more and more unsettling to the landowners and homeowners that it will effect the most. Please consider their voices.
    Look at the facts and kindly BLOCK RICL. Thank you.

    Brooke Beetz
  • October 26, 2012

    October 26, 2012

    Larry Jones
    Administrative Law Judge
    Illinois Commerce Commission
    527 E. Capitol Avenue
    Springfield, IL 62701

    RE: Rock Island Clean Line Petition Illinois Commerce Commission
    Docket Number 12-0568 (or subsequent re-filed petitions)

    Dear Judge Jones:

    Please be advised that as a resident of the State of Illinois, and fourth generation tenant farmer on my family’s century-old family farm, I object to Rock Island Clean Line LLC’s petition for a certificate as a public utility pursuant to 220 ILCS 5/8-406(a) as stated in Docket No. 12-0560.

    I also object to any subsequent petitions filed on behalf of Rock Island Clean Line LLC seeking a certificate to construct a specific transmission line or other facilities pursuant to 220 ILCS 5/8-503, and a certificate to exercise the power of eminent domain in connection with the construction of facilities pursuant to 220ILCS 5/8-509.

    Illinois farmland, which as you well know, is a non-renewable resource, should not be taken out of production by a private corporation for private gain. I beg you to seriously think about this the next time you take a bite of food. There is currently adequate public utility service for the residents of the State of Illinois and Rock Island Clean Line LLC’s proposed project does not serve a public purpose. Rock Island Clean Line LLC’s project has no legal justification to authorize the taking of private land for private gain.

    Thank you in advance for your time and serious consideration in this matter.

    Sincerely,
    John R. Sondgeroth

    John R. Sondgeroth
  • October 26, 2012

    RICL is of no benefit to the taxpayers of Illinois.
    RICL is taking some of Illinois most fertile farm ground out of production.
    This farm ground is much needed to meet the demands of feeding our nation and world.
    DO NOT ALLOW.

    James Sondgeroth
  • October 26, 2012

    Our family has farmed this land for over 80 years and to allow RICL to encroach on it for THEIR personal gain, would be a great injustice. Illinois has ample supplies of energy available and RICL is not wanted or needed. DO NOT ALLOW RICL PETITION.
    Daryl Sondgeroth
  • October 26, 2012

    There is ABSOLUTELY NO VALUE to the citizens of Illinois in allowing RICL to cross our farmland.
    Kevin Cassidy
  • October 26, 2012

    PLEASE DO NOT grant utility status to the RICL project. This will NOT bring a higher quality of life or have a positive impact on the financial well being of the citizens of Illinois on any level. In fact, the long-term consequences will be detrimental. One of the most precious resources we have as a nation is the quality of our farm ground. This project would disturb thousands of acres of some of the best farm ground in the state, nation and entire world. There is NO amount of money that could replace this ground to its current state. As a former resident, of the state of Illinois, PLEASE make the RIGHT decision for your current citizens and for generations to come. This PRECIOUS farm ground is something POSITIVE that your state is known for outside the state and even outside of the United States. Please consider the horrible, long lasting implications of a wrong decision.

    Regards, Laura DiCarlo

    Laura DiCarlo
  • October 26, 2012

    I am opposed to Rock Island Clean Line (R.I.C.L.) Docket 12-0560. I am a high school student and I am planning on a career in the agricultural field and the passing of this docket will not be good in anyway, for any American when you look close at the details and see all the things that will be taken or limited in the agriculture field which is the largest industry in our economy. We should not act against our largest industry in America during these hard times.
    1. R.I.C.L. said that their transmission line will take up 12,000 acres of farm land. Farm land is not a renewable resource and we will never get it back. The consumer demand for food and goods are rising every day and it would be in the best interest of the world to make sure we can produce the goods we need.
    2. R.I.C.L. has given us one route for their one transmission line. But they have many more proposed routes that they want to run; this docket will be the setting of a precedence that will be in favor of their other proposed lines through Illinois covering each region of the state taking much needed land. This docket has to be stopped to ensure that we don’t just lose 12,000 acres when, much more is needed for our growing population and the rising demand in food production.
    3. The R.I.C.L. transmission line is not in any way beneficial to any affected party (land owners, farmers, tax payers, citizens) of Illinois for example:
    ? Lines can’t be taxed so Illinois does not gain nearly what it could
    ? The electricity that is traveling through these lines will not in any way power Illinois
    ? Land owners are not getting a fair price for the land that they are losing
    ? In addition to the unfair prices R.I.C.L. has offered, the transmission line will severely lower the property value of all surrounding land near these transmission lines
    ? R.I.C.L. transmission line does not belong to any of the farmers or land owners yet they will be held liable for the transmission lines
    ? For the transmission lines to pay for themselves the price of electricity has to go up 50%. So this plan is already not that good and efficient from a business stand point
    4. The transmission lines will severely affect the crop production in every field these lines go through for example:
    ? The heavy construction equipment used to build the transmission line will compact the farm ground so hard that the crop growing is virtually impossible and will take many years to return to its current state
    ? The towers will now have to be planted around, plowed around and sprayed around taking more time and wasting more resources and money from their own pockets
    ? The new practices that have been adopted to increase efficiency like using GPS technology to map our fields and control seed, fertilizer amounts applied, and other things that can be measured and mapped, Cannot be used because of the electricity flowing through the line will block the GPS reading of the fields
    ? Farmers will not be able to do any crop dusting since the crop spraying planes can’t fly around these transmission lines to spray the fields efficiently
    5. RICL has said this will help create jobs; however the jobs will only be temporary and will not provide any one good job security.
    6. RICL is not using existing easements. Instead of buying the rights to land deemed for utilities they want to cut a new path interfering with other industries and businesses unrelated to transmission lines.
    7. The transmission lines are providing power to the eastern grid.
    ? Ten of the states that would get power have signed a petition stating saying that they do not want or need the power that RICL’s transmission line will provide
    I strongly urge you to not allow the passing of RICL, docket 12-0560. It will have a severe negative impact on Illinois citizens alone than good for the nation overall. Respectfully submitted by Greg Bator

    Greg Bator
  • October 26, 2012

    To ICC, In regards to docket #12-0560, I'm requesting you to deny the petition filed by Rock Island Clean Line. Please keep in mind what is best for the people of Illinois for the long term, as I believe RICL's proposal is not in the best interest of Illinois and does not serve a public purpose. Please deny this petition as our state has adequate public utility services and let's support and develop in state programs and jobs. Our Illinois privately owned farmland is something we need to protect in our state for the long term sucess of our state. Please take the first step to serve our state of Illinois, for the people of Illinois with the denial of this petition by Rock Island Clean Line. Thank you, Thomas J. Burke
    Thomas J. Burke
  • October 26, 2012

    I respectfully ask that the ICC reject and deniy all attempts by the Rock Island Clean Line, LLC to obtain utility status under Docket 10-0579, Docket 12-0560 any and all future dockets they might petition. I do not allow access to my farm land located in Bureau County. I see no "necessity" to the confiscation of 12,000 acres of prime farm land for a privately owned company's greed. Please say no!
    Diane Kleczewski
  • October 26, 2012

    As an owner of farmland along one of Rock Island Clean Line's (RICL) proposed routes, I object to the project on a number of levels.

    The transmission line will cross prime farmland and relatively undisturbed landscapes, significantly affecting about 12,000 acres from production. Placing towers and lines across some of the best farmland in the world will forever prevent and/or alter normal farming operations. These are economic and operational burdens that farmers—and farmers alone—will have to bear. The line will also forever decrease the actual and aesthetic value of property. In contrast, RICL’s private, for profit venture will be backed by the power of eminent domain (if the ICC grants them a certificate of public necessity) and subsidized by our federal tax dollars. This seems patently unfair.

    RICL has argued that the transmission line is needed because of the Illinois Renewable Energy Standards. This rationale is problematic: the Standards were intended to promote development of in-state renewable energy generation, not justify construction of transmission lines that import power from elsewhere without providing connection to renewable energy projects in Illinois. Furthermore, the proposed lines would bypass most of the Illinois Smart Grid, one that residents are paying $3.2 billion to upgrade in the name of efficiency and enabling local renewable energy generation.

    We need renewable energy. I disagree, however, with a for-profit entity being granted status of a public utility so that it may construct its transmission lines at the expense of landowners and the general public. Alternative routes along already-disturbed corridors such as I-80 and I-39 must be considered. Landowners who do lose property to the lines should be compensated in perpetuity.

    Paul Litow
  • October 26, 2012

    I am writing to urge your vote against the application of RICL for public utility status. The power line would bring power from wind turbines built in and benefiting other states through one of Illinois most valuable resources-its farmland. Across Illinois, access roads, construction and towers would reduce the capacity of our state to supply grain for the world-and fuel Illinois' economy. The power line would not provide long-term jobs or income for Illinois residents. Nor would this company be providing power for the majority of our state's residents-the Illinois public. They do not deserve to be granted public utility status. An Illinois farmer, Wilbur Stamberger
    Wilbur Stamberger
  • October 23, 2012

    This company’s executives have used their previous positions to influence and manipulate members of congress, state and local governments, the FERC, DOE, ICC and the media in an effort to obtain public utility status and more importantly the ability to use eminent domain. We have found that other states have already created new agencies with the ability to grant the right to use emininent domain without any outside governmental or public approval. See Renewable Energy Transmssion Authority (RETA) website at http://www.nmreta.com/ for clarification. This is a government appointed agency - mostly governor appointed - established solely to authorize their use of eminent domain to push their projects through. If you go to the RETA website you will find that Centennial West - one of four Clean Line Energy Partners’ projects is the only RETA supported project on their site. It is not beyond comprehension that Governor Quinn - a past Hans Detweiller associate - would have the ability to create just such an agency to push this project through against public objections. With EDP and Clean Line exectuves being founders of the ISU center through hefty donations as well as AWEA, Clean Line and Horizon on ISU membership list, it is clear they have the ability to manipulate ISU study data through their interns to Clean Line’s advantage. If you visit the WECC website http://www.wecc.biz/PLANNING/TRANSMISSIONEXPANSION/RTEP/Pages/default.aspx it shows there is $14.5 million in funding available for study funding and if you look further into their membership list will find Clean Line, AWEA and Horizon are affiliated here as well.
    Four of Horizons dozen or more projects have been verified to have received over $440 millions dollars in green stimulus money. The ISU Center for Renewable Energy lists several Horizon projects as proposed, permitted and completed shows they fully intend to collect more green stimulus money in the future. Our tax money is definitely going directly to a global energy giant hiding behind its US subsidiary which got another massive payout in August of this year. Unless you know the project names, it is impossible to follow the money.
    How do we know that Clean Line doesn’t fully intend to sell out to EDP just as Horizon did in the past through their financing sources like Goldman Sachs once they get their routes locked in. EDP states in their last annual report that they will be expanding their holdings in the US substantially in the near future. Without companies like Clean Line, how else would they accomplish this?
    Government officials have not taken the time to evaluate all the information or people involved and it is more about billions of dollars, greed and power than politics as we have found participants from both sides of the isle tied to risky ventures that caused this countries financial collapse. Clean Line states billions in investment money will appear once their routes established. EDP and investment bankers would be first in line and need the transmission lines to accommodate wealthy power brokers.
    There are legitimate companies who need to benefit from the green stimulus and transmission may be necessary to accomplish our country’s energy goals; however, should we trust a company with a track record of establishing clean energy projects that sell out to investment bankers such as Goldman Sachs right before a financial collapse which brought our country into a major recession and end up in the hands of a global energy giant that is currently benefiting from our tax money and openly states it will be taking a stronger hold in the US in the near future? Do we really want to support a project that could actually turn our public utilities over to foreign control? Do we want to give such a company the right to use eminent domain to force their projects on hard working Americans?
    This is not a political nor use of federal or state tax funds issue since they have they have substantial investment sources without government assistance. This company has made it very clear that they are seeking the ability to obtain the right to use eminent domain and are willing to use misleading practices, previous positions in government and whatever means necessary to influence and manipulate the outcome of their projects. This is more an ethical issue of whether or not we should trust this company whose business practice is similar to Enron not to sell out to foreign investors.
    I respectfully ask the ICC to reject and deny all attempts by Rock Island Clean Line/Clean Line Energy Partners to obtain public utility status under Docket 10-0579 and 12-0560 and appreciate your consideration.

    Andrea Rackmyer
    Serena Township, Illinois

    Andrea Rackmyer
  • October 23, 2012

    We have been able to tie stimulus money to the wind farms with previous associations to Clean Line executives. Other key executives for Clean Line served in positions which laid out the ground rules, standards and regulations which now govern this industry - some deregulating industry roadblocks, and have now moved to the private sector where they will profit monumentally from the decisions and associations of those previous positions that continue to allow them to manipulate or influence decisions on their projects.
    Michael Skelly owned Horizon Wind/Zilka Renewables sold to Goldman Sachs in 2005 which sold to EDP Renewables in 2007 and Skelly was there until at least 2008 as a key decision maker for their organization. He is now President of Clean Line Energy Partners. He along with EDP and others founded the Center for Renewable Energy at ISU which conducted and sponsored the study which backs up their claims. Detwieller and Bill Whitlock another Horizon employee serve on the technology departments advisory board. Founding members receive recognition on all Center materials, a paid intern from the renewables program for three years, and a seat on the advisory board for their donation of $50,000 to the ISU foundation.
    Jimmy Glotfelty - Clean Line’s executive vice president served for 8 years on the US Department of Energy under George W. Bush. Glotfelty founded the US Department of Energy’s Transmission office as well as serving as its first director creating the legislation which now covers the transmission industry. He helped deregulate the oil industry under those positions allowing the oil companies to bypass environmental law while still investing millions into their industry. With the connections to powerful regulatory positions past and present is able to influence funding support from federal and investment bank sources. He is currently attempting to influence the FERC to change their regulations to accommodate their project giving them unfair advantage over other legitimate ongoing clean energy projects in our state and across this country.
    As Vice President of Strategy and Finance, Dave Berry is responsible for strategic analysis and financial modeling, as well as financing efforts and deal structuring for Clean Line. Berry structures capacity contracts, conducts research on power markets and renewable energy standards, and develops production models for the Clean Line projects. Dave also performs analyses on power systems operations and on integrating wind energy into market. Prior to joining Clean Line, Dave was the Director of Finance for Horizon Wind Energy, where he led over $2 billion in project finance transactions and was responsible for investment analysis and transactions.
    Hans Detweiller - Director of Development for Clean Line worked for American Wind Energy Association which helped establish the Renewable Portfolio Standards in conjunction with Governor Quinn which are now used to regulate the industry. The RPS standards show they are heavily weighted on the wind side which is getting 60%-75% while solar is only getting around 5-6% giving wind energy a much stronger advantage in the market. Based on the fact that he is listed on ISU technology department advisory board as a representative for AWEA, it is not clear in what capacity he still serves the agency. We are also finding their membership on various other agencies whose data they are using to back up their claims of legitimacy.
    We also have key executives with direct connections to Enron which profited from deregulation decisions made during previous administrations which benefited the energy industry and gave them impunity from environmental regulations. Current practices by Clean Line mirror that of Enron in many ways with their ability to infiltrate multiple agencies that show support of their projects.
    I respectfully ask the ICC to reject and deny all attempts by Rock Island Clean Line/Clean Line Energy Partners to obtain public utility status under Docket 10-0579 and 12-0560 and appreciate your consideration.

    Andrea Rackmyer
    Serena Township, Illinois

    Andrea Rackmyer
  • October 23, 2012

    I'm writing to request that the Illinois Commerce Commission reject the Rock Island Clean Line Project Certificate of Public Convenience (Docket #12-0560) that was filed Wednesday, October 10, 2012. It is my understanding that if you approve this request by RICL they will be granted the right of eminent domain. RICL is a privately held company who will be using lots of goverment money(subsidies or whatever you choose to call them) to acquire an EASEMENT across hundreds of parcels of farmland that the owners are against selling to them. The value of those parcels will decrease forever. These easments are the WIDTH of Illinois. What will happen if ricl goes bankrupt or decides to sell their company...Some windmill companies in northern Illinois have been sold three times. Windmills were built where landowners AGREED to have them on their land. It is my understanding that there are some of the same indivuals that were involved with windmill companies are now involved with ricl. I do not believe this kind of activity by a private company to TAKE property from unwilling landowners is what the founders of our county would approve of. Please reject Docket 12-560. Thank you. Jeanette Carothers
    Jeanette Carothers
  • October 22, 2012

    We see no need for this request. The request lacks merit and will result only in private gain, not public good. Illinois farmland should be preserved. There are other alternatives for this private entity. We see no benefit, only intrusion.

    Thank you.

    Ronald and Kathryn Brunoehler
  • October 22, 2012

    There is no public necessity in this project to justify granting Rock Island Clean Line a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity. Northern Illinois is not lacking in power generated by wind or otherwise. This is a private group of speculators rolling the dice that wholesale electricity prices will rise off of current record lows to pay for their bet, by selling the power(not necessarily "Clean") to the east coast. With State Representative Sue Rezin joining The Illinois Farm Bureau in their opposition to this project it should be clear that the large group of people who are fighting this project are more than a group of disgruntled farmers and landowners crying; "not in my backyard". We can all see that this is an overly optimistic business plan based on speculation, greed, and bad math.
    Henry Babson
  • October 22, 2012

    I am requesting the RICL be denied utility status.
    They have only filed one path for their towers but one leads to another and another. What will the people, who think this is great and support it, do when the cost of their food rises and their plates are empty, because the land and the farmer that have produced the food are gone. ILLinois is the "Bread Basket of the World".

    Patricia Rod
  • October 22, 2012

    I am not in favor of RICL placing powerlines in our area; We lived on a farm next to electric power towers, very close to our farm house, and know first hand the problems caused. They can say there will be no effect on daily life BUT that is not true. We were unable to place animals in fields near them as the cattle would not graze near them, even the chickens layed better after we move the hen house to the South side of the farm. The animals could hear or feel it. We could not farm all 160 Acres of our land because of the difficulty moving machinery around the tower legs. We stood the cost year in and year out! Less crop made Less dollars. We paid the taxes, they did not pay a penny.
    Patricia Rod
  • October 22, 2012

    I am opposed to Rock Island Clean Line building a power transmission line through Illinois farmland. It is wasteful and unnecessary.
    Christine Thorsen
  • October 22, 2012

    In 1935, Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote "A Recommendation for the Regulation of Public Utility Holding Companies" to members of Congress, in which he warned, "Through the device of these pyramided holding companies, small groups of men with a disproportionately small investment were able to dominate and to manage solely in their own interest tremendous capital investments of other people's money."

    http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=15019

    Never had truer words been written about Clean Line Energy than the words of FDR in 1935. Clean Line Energy is a company doing business as Rock Island Wind, doing business as Rock Island Clean Line. RICL is precisely why FDR believed utility companies required government supervision. The dangers of the RICL/ENRON shell model existed back in 1935.

    In 1938, Roosevelt was writing to Congress again about the corporate abuses of power and said, "The liberty of a democracy is not safe if the people tolerate the growth of private power to a point where it becomes stronger than their democratic state itself. That, in its essence, is Fascism... ownership of government by an individual, for a group, or any controlling private power."

    I have never seen a company who treats this state like it's their own such as RICL. There tactics to this point have been untruthful and dishonest. If this is the way RICL treats the residents, landowners, and stakeholders of Illinois, how is RICL going to treat the residents of Illinois if their powerline is built? Hans Detweiler and his economists without calculators make vague claims of potential savings but refuse to answer how much this electricity costs.

    That's it. One simple question. How much is this energy going to cost?

    They talk about the virtues of renewable energy, but at what cost? Illinois residents know the importance of balancing renewable energy with AFFORDABLE ENERGY. RICl's energy will likely cost $60 to $70 per megawatt. That's nowhere near current prices around $30/MW.

    RICL thinks they can do what they want with our state. RICL thinks they own this government. Zilhka Family, Ziff Bros, Skelly, Glotfelty...This is the kind of private power President Roosevelt was referring when he wrote a recommendation to Congress to regulate public utilities. I ask the Illinois Commerce Commission to help us send a message to Clean Line Energy Partners and the nation and oppose docket 12-0560.

    RICL might know Pay to Play, but RICL does not own the ICC.
    Illinois is not for the taking by RICL's rich and powerful men.

    WE OWN THIS COUNTRY!

    Scott Thorsen
  • October 22, 2012

    I'm writing to request that the Illinois Commerce Commission reject the Rock Island Clean Line Project Certificate of Public Convenience (Docket #12-0560) that was filed Wednesday, OCtober 10, 2012.

    This project came because of all the grant money for green energy. Right now I have the names of eight companies that received frants and have gone bankrupt. I am sure there are many more.

    To take prime land out of production forever, the one good thing Illinois has, would be regrettable.

    There is plenty of natural gas that will be used for energy. No more overhead lines, not more lattices 200 feet tall.

    Private investors should not be allowed to take our land. Please vote no no docket # 12-0560.

    Respectfully,
    Clarice Faber

  • October 19, 2012

    The Rock Island Clean Line needs to be stopped. It is runs straight through our prime farm ground that we need to feed the growing population when instead the power lines could run along I-80. The power from these lines is going to the east coast when the east does not need nor want this power. Farming is very important is Illinois, so the Rock Island Clean Line needs to be stopped in order that our farms be saved to be used to grow crops not a place to put up power lines. Block RICL.
    Rachel Vaessen
  • October 19, 2012

    I strongly oppose this movement. The whole idea is rather insane. The east coast that the company is sending the energy to doesn't even want/need it! Why should we risk our farm land for the sake of them? Will we get money for them paying taxes on it? Highly unlikely. Also, do you realize that in a few years the whole world is supposed to reach about 13 billion? Do you know how we will feed them when half the world, no half our country, is starving? We can't even feed our own people and you want to take valuable farm land away from us? Farm land that feeds families, helps communities prosper, and fuels our economy? I don't think you have properly looked into what you are doing. I suggest you send your little businessmen back into their offices and look into ALL the pros and cons to this. Especially the cons. Our country was built on AGRICULTURE first. We survived a pretty long time without having to introduce hard core industry until the 1800s. We cannot survive without agriculture. Ask anyone around here. The east coast can survive without extra energy that they don't even want! I strongly disagree with this movement! Thank you.
    Julia Setchell
  • October 19, 2012

    I believe that everyone should disregard the petition for the Rock Island clean line. Everyone should just block ricl. yah at one point they will create jobs, but when they are built those people will be out of a job cause they will no longer need those employees. so it will hurt our farm land by taking up space in the feilds and and it can also hurt us by having people loose the jobs..
    Manny Esquivel
  • October 19, 2012

    I am very much opposed to docket 12-0560 the petition filed from Rock Island Clean Line LLC to becoming a regulated utility and allowing the constructing of an Electric Transmission Line.
    This project fails to show its necessity to any Illinois electrical consumers. RICL said utility rates would need to increase ( 50%) to make this project profitable. East coast governors said they did not want it. Illinois should find our own ways to produce CLEAN energy,(solar, wind,etc.) which will help our state economy. Why would we want some out of state private corporation to be allowed to bring electrical power from western states 500 miles away so they can profit, when we can produce that energy right here and keep jobs in IL?
    The most devastating thing of this project is the destruction of our farmland! The current preferred route RICL proposed, goes right through some of the most productive farmland in the world which is a non renewable resource. This transmission line will jeopardize the production of agriculture and devalue the property which decreases property taxes for our schools and local government. Farming around the structures will be inconvenient and dangerous which will increase the farmers expenses. We need to produce crops on this land, not take it out of service. Agriculture is important to Illinois. Science has stated that farmers will need to produce more food in the next 50 years because of population growth. How will farmers be able to make that food without land?
    The information RICL has given to us is misleading and questionable. Clean Energy-- wind is not always consistent, what will they substitute with, coal or gas burning plants? What are the hazards of being near the transmission line which carry 3 times the power of the Hoover Dam, and has there been any studies done to confirm there is no health risk issues? What are the long term affects on families , communities, environment,etc.? RICL states they will deliver enough energy to power 1.4 million homes, who's homes and where are the homes getting their energy now? There are more questions this project raises.
    The constituents of Illinois do not need another utility company! I respectfully ask the Illinois Commerce Commission to deny and reject the Rock Island Clean Line Project- Certificate of Public Convenience (Docket No. 12-0560) that was filed October 10,2012
    Thank you , Don McLachlan


    Don McLachlan
  • October 19, 2012

    I am asking that the ICC deny the request of Rock Island Clean Line DOCKET 12-0560 to obtain public utility status. I have no objection to companies who want to invest in Illinois’ current grid improvement, but Clean Line Energy's plans are to send the energy from their lines to the East Coast. Without costly converters the power produced in IL won't be able to run through the Clean Line Energy's lines. Rock Island Clean Line admits that this project is not economically feasible. With a needed 50% increase in utility rates to make this project profitable for consumers, it should not be considered.
    This company doesn’t want to utilize existing easements along Route 80 or the Rock Island Railroad because they might have to pay more directly to our government to use them. They would rather take their lines right through prime farmland. They chose the path of least resistance and least cost to them while it would cause additional hardship to farmers who have been heavily impacted by this years drought. Additionally, we have lost over 45 MILLION acres of rural land to uncontrolled development over the past thirty years with over 23 MILLION acres of prime farmland lost. Our country not only provides food for our own country, but also exports to numerous other countries who cannot provide for themselves. This non-renewable resource cannot be replaced and the damage done by these companies cannot be undone. AGRICULTURE is the LARGEST INDUSTRY in Illinois. Farmers and ranchers in Illinois contribute billions of dollars to local economies and the state economy. Farmers are faced with producing as much food in the next 50 years as they have since the State of Illinois came into existence. Without this NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCE farmers are put at a huge disadvantage. It is estimated that this project will take 12,000 acres of farmland out of production for the profit of a few wealthy individuals.
    Rock Island Clean Line has yet to come up with evidence that these transmission lines will not cause long term health concerns for residents living near these lines. It also greatly cripples local infrastructure. These lines are set to pass through communities, near airports, through small businesses, and will ultimately cause hardships to all those near the lines.
    Rock Island Clean Line has withdrawn their previous request in an effort to remove the many objections and intervenes previously filed with the ICC and I, along with the many other objectors had respectfully requested that our comments be attached to any future filing they might make for this project. We expect that these previous objections will be attached to this current filing.
    It is important for the State of Illinois to conduct a in depth study of RICL’s comprehensive plan, similar to what is being done in the State of Iowa. With several more plans in the works, this company should be evaluated, and the impact on our state should be seen. It is their intent to blanket our state with burdensome transmission lines for their own profit.
    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.
    Carol McLachlan

    Carol McLachlan
  • October 19, 2012

    I am strongly against this idea brought about. How will the company support the discruption and loss of farm ground? What happends if the do not succeed?
    Julia Setchell
  • October 18, 2012

    Regarding Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) docket #12-0560

    I am writing to express my opposition to granting RICL a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the following reasons:

    RICL is a private corporation. The people who manage the corporation must answer to their private investors. Their priority is not and will not be for the best interests of Illinois citizens.

    RICL is not a public utility.

    This is not an economically viable project.

    The proposed project will charge Illinois citizens a fee via higher electric rates and "development" charges.

    Current Illinois public utilities will not be able to tap into the project.

    This project will hamper development of wind, solar, coal, and nuclear energy in Illinois.

    There is no demand for the electrical energy in Illinois or in the states on the east coast.

    State governors on the east coast have publicly stated their opposition to this type of project.

    Construction of the line will lower property values and decrease local and state revenue.

    The project will interfere with established business operations along its path (i.e. family farms, corporate farms, private airports, aerial spraying).

    Little, if any, permanent jobs will result in illinois.

    RICL has shown little, if any, respect for property owner rights along the proposed corridors.

    An INDEPENDENT STUDY on the environmental and economical impact resulting from RICL proposals has never been initiated by the Illinois Commerce Commission.

    I request that all public comments submitted under RICL prior docket number, 10-0579, be transferred to the new docket, 12-0560.

    Please deny RICL the request for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity.

    Respectfully submitted to ICC docket 12-0560,
    Roger M. Smith

    Roger M. Smith
  • October 17, 2012

    I dont think Rock Island Clean Line is very clean. Not asking the land owners them selves would anger and start up alot of comotian. Not only with the people of the city but farmers aswell. The towers that Rock Island Clean Line would be putting up can interfear with the navigation system in the farm equipment. Also take a large portions of land from the feilds we get our food from, and take the money out of the working mans pockets. Illinois has the best agriculturial farm land. By doing this would mean your taking the profite away from the farmers around the area. This idea needs not to be takin lightly.
    Travis Westenfelt
  • October 17, 2012

    I do not think you should put up the rock island clean line new transmission line. Farming has been part of my family since the 1800s and it would destroy our fields. The lines are not a clean source of energy. You should not be able to use our lands because it is not fair to us if you are able to take part of our land for money into your pocket. your lines are health hazardous and block signals for our gps systems needed to do our farming. If your company wants to do the lines you should have to talk to the land owners and not the state. its not the states land, its the people that have worked hard all their life to have land. its not right and its basically going behind the owners back and taking over for more lines that do not need to be there. another thing is you want to access land for years and years to come when the lines are only good for 40 years. that does not seem needed. the lines arent even for us they are for people in different states and your going to ruin what we have for them. that is not a good reason to destroy our land for other places. it would maybe be benificial if it was for us but its not and all its going to do is upset people and take away money that they need to survive on. companys like you make people like me sick. you dont think of us you only think of others.
    Dalton Wittenauer
  • October 17, 2012

    I believe the rock island clean line is a waste of our countries resources. The power lines will take up farm land that can be used to feed America. The west coast that is receiving the power hadn't even asked to have more power resources. So therefore, the lines are not needed. Another reason I am against this is because my grandparents family farm will be taken advantage of with these power lines. We have had this farm for many generations and we'd hate to see the farm lose profit because of the wrong decisions by uneducated people signing for it. The RICL would be hurting our lands not only by taking up our field space but also by driving through our fields and not taking care of them as much as we would like. I ask everybody to try their best to educate as many people as possible to stop this act from happening. Thank you.
    Paige Gascoigne
  • October 17, 2012

    Rock Island Clean Line's request for public utility status is ultimately harmful for the state of Illinois and it's residents. My reasons are as follows:

    1) The so called "clean" line that would be constructed by RICL is a potential heath risk to all who reside near the proposed route. No studies have been done to test the hazardous effects of these huge power lines.
    2) Power lines such as the ones used by RICL will interfere with local residents daily lives in a negative way. As dependent as people are on G.P.S., cell phones, and satellites in today's world, these lines could potentially ruin the lives of Illinois residents.
    3) RICL's desired power lines would not produce any power for Illinois residents or bring any power Illinois residents. These lines are simply transporting power across the U.S. to states west of Illinois.
    4) Historically speaking, companies such as Rock Island Clean Line last approximately 8 to 10 years and then bankrupt or fail due to market struggles or internal conflict. This leaves the residents whose property is within RICL's projected route with huge towers and dangerous overhead wires which serve no purpose to society anywhere in the USA.
    5) Let's take a look at who benefits from the proposed power line. The benefiting party would be those receiving the power in New York, Texas, and other western states. Not to mention, RICL would also be making lots of money off of Illinois residents so the could be considered a beneficiary too.
    6) Now let's take a look at who pays the price for this power line. Now obviously RICL, being a private company, would pay for the actual construction of the line, however, the long term price for this power line is actually damage to Illinois infrastructure and potentially hazardous property for residents.
    7) Illinois is one of the best states for production farm ground across the U.S.. Many of the towers to be put up by RICL fall on prime farm ground worth literally tens of thousands of dollars an acre. By constructing these towers, RICL is stealing value from Illinois lands therefore taking money out of Illinois residents' pockets.
    8) By taking away potential production ground from farmers, RICL is adding more pressure for America's farmers to feed a growing world population with less and less production land. Modern technology is allowing farmers to produce more with less land, however, when you get down to the meat and potatoes of the situation, less land is less food.

    My reasoning for posting this comment concerning the Rock Island Clean Line is simply to protect the residents of Illinois any way I can. Illinois residents such as myself are in an economic downturn. People are losing jobs, homes, and families. How we can allow RICL to come to Illinois and add to this deficit is beyond my comprehension, and simply put, this can not happen. Block economic downturn, protect Illinois residents, Block RICL.

    Andrew Klein
  • October 17, 2012

    I feel everyone should vote against the Rock Island Clean Line, this power source is not needed. Its going to ruin thousands of acres of some of the most productive farm land around. This line is going to run near our dairy farm and with that much power going overhead the cows are not going to be able to function properly. With all the voltage the cows are going to be uncomfortable and the milk production will drop tremendously. Its also gonna have a big effect on reproduction. All this line is gonna do is make the rich guy richer and the poor guy poorer. i also think they shouldn't just have the right to eminent domain, somebody worked hard to purchase that farm land and this line is just going to ruin it. The way it seems anyhow is that the east coast doesn't need an energy supply, so thats whats hard to figure out why throw away some of the most productive ground for power sources that are unnecessary. This is also going to reduce value of the land. The damage they are also going to do to the land compacting the ground down making it hard for future crops to grow. The towers are going to require large concrete foundations that are never going to be able to be removed, if this company were to ever shut down there's thousands of power lines and structure towers doing absolutely nothing but taking up productive farm ground. The owners/operated of this line are very rude and selfish to be just privately building on a private landowners property that is 100% useless to the land owner. If anything they should at least have contracts for landowners to sign instead of just infesting there land that they have owned for many years.

    Please vote against this line

    Thank you


    Patrick Quest
  • October 17, 2012

    I think that all of this farmland used to make these towers is only for a few people and that every acre that this project will take up of land is needed to feed the world with production agriculture. The power from these lines interrupts GPS signals used by farming equipment. I am against the Rock Island clean line.
    Will Crownhart
  • October 17, 2012

    This will destroy the fields by destroying our farm land. This will decrease the value of all of our farm land too.
    I have a sign in my yard going against this act.

    Kelsie Thurman
  • October 17, 2012

    I am not for this because it will hurt us more then the people out in the east cost. The people in the east cost dont even want this so why are they putting them up in the first place. It is just going to be a bother to the farmers and i think it is just a bad idea!!!!
    aubri arellano
  • October 17, 2012

    all the land you are going to ruin will not be worth it. what happens when your business goes bankrupt and then these structures will just going to be a waste. this is how feel
    Emmitt Hicks
  • October 17, 2012

    Stop taking away from our farms!
    ashley temes
  • October 17, 2012

    12-0560
    Rock Island Clean Line LLC
    Petition for an Order granting Rock Island Clean Line LLC a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity pursuant to Section 8-406 of the Public Utilities Act as a Transmission Public Utility and to Construct, Operate and Maintain an Electric Transmission Line and Authorizing and Directing Rock Island Rock Island pursuant to Section 8-503 of the Public Utilities Act to Construct an Electric Transmission Line.

    Manny Esquivel
  • October 17, 2012

    I would like to ask that the petition for Rock Island Clean Line be denied.
    Aaron Hubbell
  • October 16, 2012

    I hope you consider the long term effects of a high voltage electric line crossing Illinois and leaving no long term benefit. I was told at their meeting that Illinois would receive no electricity from them so there would be no decrease in our electric costs. Jobs would be minimal. As once erected, maintance personel would come from out of state. Our county and township boards have requested more inforamtion. Until then, they have decided oppose these lines. We were also told they would use monopoles and now learn that they are using 28 x 28 foot latice poles. What else have we been misinformed on? Please consider all sides carefully. Thank you, Mary Sundberg
    Mary Sundberg
  • October 16, 2012

    According to the president and co-founder of Clean Line Energy, he states that wholesale electric prices must go up 50% in order for this line to be economically feasible. How could anyone support this line if they truly have Illinois families and residents best interests in mind?
    Scott Freebairn
  • October 16, 2012

    I am firmly opposed the Rock Island Clean Line’s request for public utility status through docket 12-0560. Please deny them the right to gain public utility status and subsequently the right to eminent domain. This project is unneeded and unwarranted for the State of Illinois for the following reasons.

    1. Profit from the project will be used for the benefit of individuals, not electric customers and the residents of Illinois. Many of the same people that wrote the biased policies that regulate this industry are now trying to profit from the regulations that they drafted.
    2. AGRICULTURE is the LARGEST INDUSTRY in Illinois. Farmers and ranchers in Illinois contribute billions of dollars to local economies and the state economy. Farmers are faced with producing as much food in the next 50 years as they have since the State of Illinois came into existence. Without this NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCE farmers are put at a huge disadvantage. It is estimated that this project will take 12,000 acres of farmland out of production for the profit of a few wealthy individuals.
    3. Rock Island Clean Line has yet to come up with evidence that these transmission lines will not cause long term health concerns for residents living near these lines. It also greatly cripples local infrastructure. These lines are set to pass through communities, near airports, through small businesses, and will ultimately cause hardships to all those near the lines.
    4. Rock Island Clean Line admits that this project is not economically feasible. With a needed 50% increase in utility rates to make this project profitable for consumers, it should not be considered.
    5. Rock Island Clean Line has done very little to answer the concerns of landowners and local stakeholders. Many landowners are unaware of the impact the lines will have and liability that they face as a result of the project. They have been asked to speak with leadership of landowner groups, but refuse.
    6. Local taxing entities will also be affected by the project. With a 20%-30% decrease in land values, the property taxes that support our schools, local governments, and our state government will suffer greatly. Since they intend to be a public utility, they will be left to reap the profits and deny tax revenue.
    7. Rock Island Clean Line refuses to use easements established along Interstate 80, it’s namesake Rock Island Rail Line, and other current projects. Cutting through the middle of the agriculture industry seems to be the path of least resistance, and that is the one they have chosen to take.
    8. Rock Island continues to use legal tactics, trickery, and deceit to help it’s cause. It is a dishonest group of individuals, who have done nothing to ensure the safety, economic security, and values of the stakeholders that are affected.
    9. The best renewable energy plan for our state is to produce the energy within our state lines. With local renewable energy, citizens of the state greatly benefit from tax revenue, lower utility rates, and profit from this energy. With this plan all of the profit will be directly shipped to Texas, New York, and states west of Illinois.
    10. The claims that this is a “clean line” are also false. During times of low production coal, nuclear, and natural gas plants will be used to feed the transmission line. This will compete with our public utilities that are already in place in Illinois, by creating a direct highway for out of state energy to enter. Without the availability of converter stations our energy produced in Illinois will not be able to join this line.
    11. It is important for the State of Illinois to conduct a in depth study of RICL’s comprehensive plan, similar to what is being done in the State of Iowa. With several more plans in the works, this company should be evaluated, and the impact on our state should be seen. It is their intent to blanket our state with burdensome transmission lines for their own profit.

    Please do not allow Rock Island Clean Line public utility status. Rock Island Clean Line is wishing to be granted a “Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity” This project is surely not “convenient” for the agriculture producers that make up our economies largest industry. This project also is not a “necessity” for the citizens of Illinois and the citizens that Rock Island Clean Line claims to benefit.

    Jeff Landers
  • October 16, 2012

    STOP RICL
    DO NOT WANT RICL ON PROPERTY
    DO NOT ENTER OUR PROPERTY

    CINDY LANDERS

    CINDY LANDERS
  • October 16, 2012

    NO ON THIS RICL
    \DO NOT WANT ON OUR PROPERTY

    CONNIE POHL

    connie pohl
  • October 16, 2012

    stop ricl
    do not want on my property
    donot come on property
    will not sell

    judy forney

    JUDY FORNEY
  • October 16, 2012

    stop ricl llc

    do not want this on our property
    no not come on our property
    will not sell to ricl

    dennis/connnie pohl

    DENNIS / CONNIE POHL
  • October 16, 2012

    STOP THIS RICL LLC

    DO NOT WANT ON MY PROPERTY

    KENNETH L KREISER

    kenneth l kreiser
  • October 16, 2012

    I hope this project gets approved by the commission. If it is approved it will be a huge step in the right direction for renewable energy in Illinois.
    Nicole
  • October 16, 2012

    I am against this power line. This company has failed to prove the need for this project. I am against the power line because of the thousands of prime farm ground that will be destroyed when the need for food around the world has never been greater.
    Greg Hitchins
  • October 16, 2012

    I oppose the Rock Island Clean Line application for high voltage DC electric transmission lines across Illinois for several reasons: The proposed routes and structures permanently impair productive farm ground--interfere with irrigation and potential irrigation installations, "drag line" liquid manure applications, aerial application operations, and significantly impair weed control in and around the footprint of the proposed towers. These concerns are particularly egregious in light of available alternatives, already developed, corridors--Interstate 80, the historic Rock Island (now Iowa Interstate) Railroad right-of-way, and the Hennepin Canal (State Parkway) all of which have much less intrusive and destructive vehicle access possible.

    ONLY these alternative routes should approved and then ONLY if it is determined that Illinois must provide transit for products produced in western states for consumption in eastern states since 10 governors of such consuming states have expressed oppostion t